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FIRST 
SECTION 



Kentucky Irish American. 



FIRST 
SECTION 



VOLUME XX.-NO 11. 



LOUISVILLE, SATURDAY, MARCH 1*, 1908. 



PRICE FIVE CEN1H 



SHAMROCKS 



win Be in Evidence, in the 

Three Cities Next 

Tuesday. 



r.m ltitii«|tirt at Local Hostelry 

will Gather the Loyal 

Hibernians. 



Irish Brethren in J tflfef MBVtllc 
Will Hare Counter 

\ 1 1 rjKl ion . 



ALL ARRANGED IN PERFECT TASTE 



If the snn will only shine pro- 
pitously Tuesday the wearing of the 
gre»ii will be resplendent in and 
about the FailH Cities. Louisville 
and Joffersonville have their separate 
celebrations, but .Now Albuny Hiber- 
nians will probably divide 1heir of- 
feetioiis between the sister cities on 
eae.h side of the river. Bven if the 
sun refuses to glorify the earth 
thousands of our eiti/ens will wear 
green anyhow. Tiio <lew of Irish 
tears has always made shamrocks 
show the brighter, so why should the 
tears of heaven cause them to hide 
There will l>e bampic/ts. literary exer- 
cises, dances and socials in the WW 

ing. while the Irish Catholic oburchcs 

will have appropriate celelirntions in 
the morning'. 

The great celebration of the day 
for Irish Catholics of I<ouisville will 
be held at the LoohWttte Hotel at H 
o'clock Tuesday evening, ami will be 
under the auspices of flic Ancient 

Order of Hibernians. It will be in 
the form of a banquet, with custom- 
ary toasts and appropriate Irish mil 
Amerieati national music. The County 
Hoard bogan its plans six w«-el:s ago. 
and Con nt v President Murphv named 
John M. Mnlloy, 1). J. Coleman, W'll- 
iam J. Connelly and Joe Lynch on a 
commit tee to make the necessary ar 
rnugemcntis. The inenilHTs of this 
committee have work'nl faithful!,, 
and each individual did his part. 
Chairman Mnlloy kept his colleague, 
busy anil they in turn aroused enthu- 
siasm among their fellows. The re- 
sult is that the Hibernians are to 
lie treated to a fea.st that will satisfy 
l>oth the physical and mental man. 
The Ladies' Auxiliary joined hands 
with the Hibernians nnd will as- 
semble around the lvanipiet table 
anrl enjoy the good things that have 
l»cn provided. As all good Catholics 
should, the Hibernians and the 
Inulies' Auxiliary will prepare for the 
fea.st of St. Patrick by approaching 
holy communion at St. Patrick 1 
church at 6:30 o'clock tomorrow 
morning. 

While Chairman Mnlloy superin- 
tended the rwhole affair, he confided 
the arrangements for the menu 
proper to I). J. Coleman, the chef ut 
the Louisville Hotel and his colleague 
on the committee. ' While the fea it 
is in progress, and between the 
toast-. Thomas Sea Ill's band will dis- 
course Irwh ami American national 
airs- The menu cards for the occa- 
sion are of artistic design with outer 
cover of gru-n, while the inner pag> s 
are white* but the lettering U in 
green. The menu arranged by Ch?f 
D. J. Coleman is as follows. 
Grape Fruit, 
Celery. p Olives. 

Fillet of Heef with Mushrooms, 

llollatwlaiee Potatoes, 

Hraised Sweetbreads. Qreen Peas, 

Lettuce Salad. 
Uriek Ice Cream, Taney Cakes. 

Philadelphia Cream C h WBQJ , 
Toasted < nickers. 
/Coffee. 

The Hibernians and their 1 a . i i •- 
will be received in tin- parlors of the 
Louisville Hotel and engage in social 
chat until the tim-1 for the ha m pi c t 
Is announced. Scully's band will 
|ilay the qplrtted inarch that will 
carry the guests to the dining hall, 
where County President Murphy, as 
Toast.master.'will deliver the address 
of welcome. After the viands have 
Been dispatched Mr. Murphy will In- 
troduce the speakers in Hie following 
order: "Cead Mllle Fallthe," John A. 
Murphy; "Good of the Order." 
George J. Hutler; "Irish Literature 
and Poetry," Judge Matt O'Dohcrty; 
"The Ifciy We Celebrate." Thomas 
Keenan: vocal solo. Miss Mary Cor- 
coran. Scully's band will render ap- 
propriate mush- between each num- 
ber- 

The Irish Catholics of Jeffcrson- 
ville have arranged for an .ntertain- 
ment on the same night, and. as in 
liOulsville, it will be under the aus- 
pices of lln> Hibernians. Bernard 
Coyle, Redmond Stanton nnd Michael 
Kinney, who OOmpOM the commit te 
on that side of the river, have dis- 
played great taste in the invitatinns 
sen* out- The cover shows embossed 
Irish nnd American flags "In a cluster, 
with the wunburst of Inland peep- 
ing up behind. The eelebrntion will 
be held nt Pfau's Hall, anil will be 
of a literary and musical character. 

Hon. Thomas Walsh, one of Louis- 
ville's leading attorneys, and a lojal 
Hibernian as well as a naCve of 
Ind'mnn. will deliver the principal ad- 
dress. Hlg subject will be "The Day 
We Celebrate." William M. Higgins. 
editor of the Kentucky Irish Ameri- 
can, and William T. Meehan. of Divis- 
ion 2, will be among the guests of 
honor in .Tef fersonville. and many 
other Louisville Irish men and 
women will go tr. swejl the crowd, 
because they feel assured of a hos- 
pitable reception and a pleasing 
evpnlng's entertainment. 

tnmOBM RANK DRILL. 



Both companies of Cnlform Rnnk. 
C. K. of A., in full force assembled 
at Phoenix Hill Hall Tuesday night, 
ami all were pleas'xi with thnt 
spacious drill room nnd new armory 
They were drilled through various 
movements by Capt. Ous Kane, and 
Major Gen. Reiehert put them 
through the sword manual. During 



the drill (ien. Reich* rt took occasion 
to announce his appointment of Cap;, 
(ins Kane as Inspector General with 
the rank of Rrigadier, and the pro- 
motion of Col. Joseph P. McGinn to 
the hea<l of the Kngineer's Corps 
with the rank of Genernl. He also 
announced that a new company had 
been organized in Nebraska. 

FINDS F.WOK 




Does Candidacy of Her- 
man D. INewcomb Por 
Congress. 



Hon- Herman I). Newcomb's can- 
vass for the Democratic notninati Ml 
for Congress from this district is 
everywhere receiving favorable com- 
nient. and he is getting many Matter- 
ing assurances of support. Mr. New- 



comb is making his appeal directly 
to the musses and to the .link ami 
file. His friends, ami they are 
legion, assert that he is free from a.! 
entangling alliances, ami that having 
kept clenr of factional troubles 
within the party he is free to appeal 
to all its elements and to reunite its 
hosts at a time when a solid Demo- 
cratic phalanx i- absolutely necessary 
to success. The adherents of Mr. 
Newcomb point with pride to his 
brilliunt record as a member of the 
State Legislature, as a lb-present a- 
tive from the County of Jefferson 
in the sessions of l'.ioi and 1904. 

His friends and s-upiporters demon- 
strate that practically anything he 
advocated was adopted, bill that any- 
thing he opposed during those two 
sessions was defeated, ami that he 
is credited with originating the 
lurgest number of bills thnt passed 
while he was a member of the House, 
Mr. Newcomb is responsible for sev- 
eral acts for the, benefit of I^ouls- 
villi- people, among them the bill 
establishing the Free Kindergarten 
System; the bill allowing the Com* 
inonwealUi's Attorney an assistant, 
thus hastening procedure* in the 
Circuit Court; and B bill under whose 
provisions n'W title companies were 
permitted to enter this territory, 
limit affording competition in a line 
previously nionojsdistie. Another 
[ilea thnt his friends urge is his 
■■tinned advocacy of the cause ot 
tin- workingman. 

In 10(14 be resigned ns a member 

of tip- Bones of Pnprsssntattres to 

qualify as Democratic Elector from 
this ilistricit, and he gave nil his 
time ami attention to that work. 
He is a ready speaker and n debater 
that takes advantage of his oppon- 
ent's weakness. His many admirers 
believe be will be the Democrat te 
standard-bearer in the coming cam- 
paign. ^ 



COUNTY HO A HI) 



Plans Merger of Local 
Hibernian Marching 
Clubs. 



The County Hoard met in regular 
session at llertraml Hall Ttteedej 
night with President John A. Mur- 
phy in the chair and all the division.-' 
we'll represent-- d. John M. Million 
reported in behalf of the committee 
that is making arrangements for the 
St. Patrick's day celebration, and Un- 
report of the committee wu.s ap- 
proved and the members commended 
for their good work. The* were also 
authorized to extend a formal invita- 
tion to the Ladies' Auxiliary to at- 
tend tin- banquet. Judge Patrick T. 
Sullivan reported that all arrange- 
ments hod been made for the. four 
divisions and the Ladies' Auxiliary to 
res ol ve holy communion nt St. Pal- 
rick's churvh at (i::i(| o'clock tomor- 
row morning- 

State President George J. Hutler 
was called upon for a talk and ex- 
pressed 'his pleasuru and satisfaction 

with the progress of tl nler ui 

Jefferson county. He said it would 
measure above the standard of other 
benevolent societies in Ibis city and 
county, and announced that th" 
meetings of all four divisions, wee 
being better attended than formerly. 

After a full discussion of the mui- 
ter it was deckled not to reduce, tne 
initiation fee for a temporary period 
as had been promised at a previous 
meeting. County President Murphy 
was authorized to merge the several 
inarching chilis into one grand unit. 
For this purpose a special meeting 
will be h<-hl at the hall of Division 1 
on the night of Friday. March ft, 
StMte President Hutler stated that 
lie- u.i- in heart J accord with the 
movemenlt to establish a nniform"d 
company ami would lend it any as- 
sistance in his power. The board ad- 
journed to meet ot the call of the 
County President. 

HKXHV PAHLICK'S VKNTl'RE. 



Henry TVsliek. one of the most 
farsighled renl estate men in Ixrfils- 
ville. has g<one into the busines for 
himself, and has apcneid an office in 
the Louisville Trust Company's build- 
ing, nt Fifth and Market stree4s. HU 
advertisement will lie seen elsewhere 
in the columns of this paper. Mr. 
Pa-slick knows all about Louisville 
property and its values. He was for 
several years n deputy in the County 
Assessor's office and later wenit to 
John A. Strn'tton & Oompanv. Since 
the death of Mr. Stratton Mr. Pns- 
Hck was. manager of the company's 
business. His many friend* wish 
him success in his new venture. 



HKLOVKI) LA DY 



Passed Away Full off Yee 
and Honored by Her 
Assodal 



REMINISCENT. 



HELOVF.D LADY. 

In the death of Mrs. Mary Wolf, 
who passed away Monday morning, 
the Ctithcdrul parish mourns one of 
its oldest members 1 For more thin 
forty years she had been active in 
all the church anil charitable work 
undertaken by the people of teat 
congregation- The dec-eased wus 
born in Louisville sixty-five years 
ago, nnd resided here all her lii'c. 
Prior to her marringc te the late 
George Wolf, at one time Ixiulsvi'le .* 
lending jeweler, she wus Miss Mary 
l-'remer, a sister of the ln/te Charles 
Kremer, for many years City Whnri- 
BUMtor, and Cjupt. Theodore Kremer. 
of the police force. 

Mrs. Wolf had been ill two weeks 
nnd suffered From n complication of 
diseases. Three sons, George W. and 
Alfred, who condnict die business of 
George Wolf & Company, on Foii'th 
nvenne, and William 1). Wolf, of the 
firm of the Louisville I>ry G<«nls Com- 
pany, survive her. The. funeral took 
place from the Cathedral Wednesday 
morning, and that stately edifice was 
crowded with friends of the deceased 
who oiuiie from all parts of the city 
to pay their last rcspeots to h-r 
mortal remains. 



HKA HIN(i FRUIT 



Mackln's Membership Con- 
test Certainly Shows 
Good Result. 



Mackin Conncil's m»«-.ting Tuesday 
night develope«l that the work en- 
gaged in by the rival teams headed 
iy Capts. dalway and Raidy is bear- 
ing fruit. President Robert i. Hurkc 
had hardly announced thai tin- coun- 
cil was ready for business before 
leven new members were elected, 
anil two more applications were nn- 
nlounced. 'lliomas BMhniU was made 
Secretary for the evening in the ab- 
sence of Austin Walsh. 

Grand Seeretury Owen (amy's re- 
jsirt of the pro»-e«slings ot t he r. rent 
meeting of the Hoard of Grand 
Directors was read and ordered filed. 
The council concurred in the recom- 
mendation made by the Grand Hoard. 
A |>iirt of the evmiiug was sjM-nt in 
the discussion at routine affairs, nnd 
all former business before the coun- 
cil was cleared up. It had been 
previously arranged to hold the next 
initiation on March and the com- 
mittee making arrangenvsiln recoin- 
inendisl that Grand President La 

\'ega elements, a member of Bnrte 

Council, Owenslsiro, be invited tt> 
come and deliver an address <ni that 
dny. The suggestion of ih commit 

tee was approved end an invitation 
was ordered sent to Mr. Clements, 

The Opera Committee reported that 
regular rehearsals were Uling held, 
and due progress was being made in 
preparing for the production of "A 
Mile From Town." 



RISING 



MIARMAl Is | 



One of Louisville's rising youn» 
druggists is Dr. Thojiias J, Kciiney. 
who conducts the pharmacy at Sixth 
and Oak streets. Less than thirty 
years old. he is now on th>' MfD 
road to sueOSB. l)r- Kenney was born 
in Louisville and after attending the 
I ki rc m-1i in 1 sclnsds here wns sent to 
St. Meinrad's College, in Spencer 
county, Ind.. and later to St. Mary's 
College. Marion county. Ky., to com- 
plete his education. I'pon lenving 
oollege he detenmlned to become •» 




pharmacist ami after finishing hU 
studies at one of the leading univer- 
sities he returned to Louisville and 
entered the employ of the Ren/ 
Drug Company, five year ago. Dur- 
ing the pust three years he has been 
the manager of their house at Sec- 
ond ami Market streets. Since the 
first of the present year he has been 
proprietor of the pharmacy at Sixth 
nnd Oak streets, lie is a member of 
Mm Ancient Order of Hibernians and 
of the Catholic Order of Foresters. 



I K .11 I \ I NO'S WORK. 

During the thunder storm that 
swept over the Ohio Valley last week 
the spire on the Catholic church at 
Dogwood, Harrison county, Ind., was 
struck by lightning and badly dam- 
aged, it will be rebuilt as soon as 
possible. 

si to: TO WIN. 



Thoma* Dolan, a well known mem- 
ber of Division 4, A. O. IL, has 
opened the "A. S. of E " tjibacco fac- 
tory St the southeast corner of 
Seventh and Oak streets, ami the 
orders that he has on hand indicate 
the thriving nature of his business. 
His leading brand at present is "The 
Trust Thiater." With the general op- 
position to trusts Mr. Dolan ought 
to become one of Kentucky's leading 
n»nufacturera. 



Phenomenal tirowth of the 
Ancient order Of Hiber- 
nians. 

Comparative!) Small Hall Was 
tdequatc When Loiiitivllle 

\>as Site. 



Southern Membership l>oen Not 
Show Any Marked In 

er< 



j Mini 
reuse. 



BIG ASSEMBLY IS IN PROPECT 



Loci 



The growth of the Ancient Oder o 
Hibernians in the United States has 
in- n remarkable, ou< might aay 
phenomenal, within the last thirty 
years. While it ha* grown in this 
State within that time the growth 
here is not as marked us in some 
other sections of the country. The 
first division organised in Kentucky 
wns Division 1, of Louisville, and it 
was for the grt-uter part made up of 
Irish iiiember.s of the. Cathedral pur- 
ish.. ThaJt division wms organized in 
IsTJ. it was quick r followed by 
Division composed < ' men from the 
eastern section of th city and "the 
Hill." Then St. ft tri.-k's iiarish 
ooiiie to the front v H'h Division 3, 
and ere long Lime Ick organized 
Division 4. 

In those old days there were (street 
parades ami all the Hibernians were 
in line on Sit. Patrick's day. More 
Irish immigrants were coining t> 
1/Oilisvllle then than ooui" now, ami 
tin- enthusiasm was great. The first 
State convention of the order was 
held in this city, and the sessions 
were all conducted in the hall over 
St. Nicholas Hotel, the hostelry now 
conducted by former Magistrate Jo- 
seph H. Keyer, at Sixth and Court 
Piece. In those days the entire top 
floor was used as a lodge room by 
various societies. The first Stale 
delegate to a National convention 
mis the late ,lphn M. Hennessy. 

The order grew and flourished, and 
Kentucky Hibernians were such good 
workers that they brought the Na- 
tional convention' to Louisville In 
ISM). Among the workers in those 
old days were many now dead - 
Mwfathew Curran. Thomas P. ( lines. 
John M. Hennessy, William Sullivan, 
John Sullivan, James P. Itogers, John 
Gillen and Thomas (^aln. Other early 
inn^bers are still liwr^r and can ted 
in f crest 'ie_' stories of tunes now gone 
by. Martin Cusick. who has held 
every position In the gift of the di- 
vision. County and State; Thomas 
Shelly, Owen Keiran, Thomas 
Keenan. John M. Mulloy. fatrick T. 
Sullivan, George J. Butler, John A. 
Murphy, James Coleina.n and Harry 
ltra.lv. Nearly every one of the..e 
luive held positions of 'honor and 
trust in the order, and nt least one 
was a member of the National Hoard. 

When the national convention was 
held here n coui|>aratively snail] hall 
sufficed to holil the delegates, but 
now the ord' r has grow n t o such pro- 
portions thnt it will require an as 

ssmbiy room witb s«iting onpnetty 

for at least I. delegates. Add t-> 

these delegates the thousands of vis- 
itors and you will not wonder thnt 
the Indianapolis Hibernians have se- 
cured Tonilinson Hall for the na- 
tional convent, ion to be held in July. 
Among the prominent men who wen- 
delegates to the national convention 
that met in (tonlstille twenty-two 
years ago were Hon. Maurice f, 
Wi lb-re. who was National President, 
nnd nt that time Postmaster of Phil- 
adelphia: Hon. John Pit/patricck. 
Mayor of New Orleans, who nfter- 
wanl bivame National President' 
Hon. Btohnrd C. Kerens, of St. I^mis. 
<w-ho iitts sjiiwe tieeoiue a millionaire, 
end Hon. Jeremiah Crowley, then 
■ rving Oiis eOODBd term as Mayor of 
Lowell, Mass. Nearly every State in 
the (Jnion sent nt leant one of its 
leading sons to the delibi-nul ions held 
by the Hibernians in this city. 

In those i.a.v - there werv only a 
leu divisions in each Stale, and there 
were several less Suites then than 
now. Hut the membership continued 
to grow, until now Mi: New Kngland 
States have more divisions than 
there were in the United States in 
1886. N'eiw York, New Jersey, Dela- 
ware. Pennsyh unia and Maryland 
show large nuniiiers of divisions in 
all their cil.i s and town-. Though 
the order is not progressing ns it 
should in the Soiul.h. the growth is 
steady. People who live in Kentucky, 
and who know bow immigration 
from Ireland to this section has 
fallen off, will understand why the 
growth of HLocrnianisin in the South 
is retarded. 

In the Northern and Western 
States the growth is better than in 
the South, yet ull are striving for 
the same end — the aims unity, fra- 
ternity and true (^ristian charity. 
Since Louisville wms the site of tin- 
national convention Hibernians have 
met in every section of the land, and 
MMh year »iaw an increased number 
of del gates- When the delegates 
assemble in IndWinapoiis next July 
they will fill Tomlinson Hull, the 
largest in tin- Hoosier capital. He- 
sides the d. •• - there will be 
thousands of visitors. Louisville ex- 
pectfi 'to send several hundred men 
aside from their delegates, the 
Marching Club and Hibernian Rifles, 
Ohicago, Cincinnati. Cleveland. Mil- 
waukee and Detroit will also send 
large contingents. The l>nke States 
ami the Ohio Valley are sure to be 
well represented in the big street 
pornde that is to add glory to the 
forthcoming assembly. 

Another feature that can be noted 
in connection with the A. 0. H. is the 
way it has grown into fhvor with 
the Hergy. Since the Louisville con- 
vention men like Arrfibkhops Farley, 
Glennon. Ilyan. C.orrigon. Quigley 
and Ireland: Hiahops Feehan, Mc- 
Faul and otiiers have «erve«l as No- 



tional Chaplains. Moreover the 
greater number of the divisions 
have a parish priest for Chaplain. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary, if it evicted 
nt all in 18811, was practically an un- 
known ipiuntity for years after- Now 
there are brunches of the auxiliary 
in every SUvtc, nnd in some cities 
many branches. The ladies will be 
much in evidence nt. Indiaiuiisilis this 
summer and their national organi- 
zation will hold its convention while 
the Hibernians an- holding theirs. 
The auxiliary lias a membership of 
more than MI.IMHI. 

Hiberniauism is doing a grent 
work not only for the Irish but for 

the church. A bond <>f membership 

exists among its PlOOSbem that is 
not known In any other purely Irish 
Cntholie society. It is recognized a~ 
a power for good, and those in au- 
thority encourage membership in the 
orguniz.at ion. 

VU, GOES WELL 



Willi Division 3, and Its 
Members Are Full of 
Cheer. 



Division 3, A. O. H, held one of th.? 
best attended meetings in its history 
Friday night of last weed,, and Pre-i- 
dent Patrick T. Sullivan did not hesi- 
tate to expross his appreciation of 
the fact. James Trestoii and Thomas 
Owens, new members who had re- 
ceived the degrees at the joint 
initiation a week previous, made brief 
talks on their experiences, express- 
ing pleasure with nil the lessons 
they had lea null. State President 
George J. Hutler, Patrick Holley and 
Patrick Welsh addressed the mem* 
bntl on the approaching St. Pat- 
rick's day eelebrntion. 

llefore the meeting closed the 
division discussed and unanimously 
approved the County Hoard's decision 
not to redoes the initiation fee for 
a term of six months. 

AMUSING DEBATE 



Between Irish and German 
Young Men of Trin- 
ity Council. 



President James II. Kelly and the 
Other officers of Trinity Council were 
gratified at the attendance at Trinity 
Council Monday night, and nlOMed 

with the interest that is hvfnc shown 

by all the members. Two more appli- 
cations were received and referred to 
committees. It was determined to 
have the first posrf-l.cntcu reception 
ami euchre on the night of April S3. 
Dr. (i. P. Iteut'l was appointed Chair- 
man of a committee to arrange the 
details of the. affair. 

The It. .jid of Directors of Trinity's 
Aid S<s-iei.y held a meeting and it-, 
report* to t he council were very grati- 
fying. Work on the superstructur- 
for the new club house will begin ill 
once. Joseph Sibler, the populur 
builder, 'has secured the contract 
for the carpenter work. After a 
great amount of routine work had 
been disposed of a lively debate fol- 
lowed about the advisability of hold- 
ing a reception and dance on St. 
Patrick's night. An amusing feature 
was that the German-Americans 
wanted to celebrate in honor of 
Krin's saint, while the young men of 
Irish descent were opposed to it, not 
from lack of patriotic spirit lint 
because this is the Lenten season. 
It was finally djeetded not to cele- 
brate until after Butter, 

II \s HADE A HIT. 



Paul J. Olbernian is one of the 
Frankfort boys who have made good 
In Louisville. He came here from 
the State capital six years ago. For 




awhile he was with Joe Kottman and 
then became a trusted employe of 
Al Kolb. Later he removed to Mad- 
ison. Ind.. where he embarked in 
business for himself. Mr. Olberman 
did not like- Madison as well as 
Louisville and over a year ago re- 
turned to this city and took a posi- 
tion with Tony Montedonico, at 644 
West Jefferson street. There he Is 
making new friends every day. He 
belongs to an old, popular Catholic 
family at Frankfort, and Is a nephew 
of Col. J. Fred Kellner, Jr., of Louis- 
ville. 



No ■QMS \ BT. 

The BnihUiv Committee of the 
Catholic Woman's Club held a meet- 
ing Tuesday afternoon ami discussed 
plans for a new home. The ladies 
have been offered several buildings, 
but are undecided whether to build 
a new home or to remodel on* al- 
ready built. It was decided to post- 
pone definite action until a later 
date. 



BELOVED PASTOR DEAD. 



Bocheeter. He was born In Ireland 
slxty-eljtht years ago, and was or- 
dained in 1863. Bight Hev. Thomas 
F. Hlckey. Coadjutor Bishop of 
Hochester, officiated at the requiem 
mass held In St. Bernard's church, 
Sclplo Center, Thursday morning of 
this week. 

II 031 E TALENT 



DISASTER 



Will Furnish Entertainment 
After Lenten Season 
Passes. 



Hev. Father Hugh Rafferty. pas- 
tor nf the church at Sclplo Center, 
New York, was one of the most pop- 
ular clergymen In tho diocese of 



The lending feature of ithe m-etlng 
of Division 4, A. O. II.. Monday night 
was the determination of the mem- 
bers to give a high class vaudeville 
entertainment, immediately after 
Lent. Th.- entire pnseedings of the 
evening were interesting and 
showed that the. pleasant quartern in 
Pert rami Hall have been beneficial 
to the division. 

President Hencssy wns on haul, 
and as soon as the session was called 
John McDermott. John O'Dalv, John 
McN.itn.-ira and Thomas Campion 
war- obligated. Charles Callahan 

esse reported on the sick list, and 

Michael Ward, who had been ill. was 
reported well. John Fitzgiblsins wh < 
appointed a delegate to the Cntholi • 
rederejtion Instead of Joseph I,. 
I.enihan, whose multifarious dirties 
anil cares preclude his regulnr at- 
tendance at sessions of that bod ! 
It was decided to equip the new mili- 
tary company with swords instead of 
rifles, and to change the mime of 
that organization to the Hibernian 
Knights. President HenMSSy urged 
all 1he. young men In the division 
to join the company and attend the 
drills. He also urged all the mem- 
bers who could possibly mnlK it eon* 

venieiil to approach the holy sacra- 
ment of the ciieharist at St. Pal- 
rick's church on March 1.1. 

The FnterKiitnncnt Committee re- 
ported that it favored giving a higa 
clnss entertainment soon titer 
Bneter, the performers to be chosen 
from the best amateur talent in the 
city ami as far as possible from 
among the members of the four di- 
visions and from the Ladies' Aux- 
iliary. The division approved the 
plan and President Hennessy named 
the following committee to conduct 
all arrangements: Stephen J. Me- 
BHlott, David lieilly. C. A. Curtin. 
Joseph 1*. McGinn, dirtm Fit/ffibbons. 
John -I. Harry and Thomas Dignan. 

following names were pre- 
for membership: Sylvesite,- 
i John lloran. . lames Sexton, D. 
rt n«-1 1 . Rlebnrd Mulloy, F.ugetie 
n, M. J- Collins, Patrick 
e. Michael llognn, John Holmes 
and Edward McGarry. 

It was the unanimous sense of 

tl assembled that the County 

Hoard should be Urged to hold an- 
other joint initiation in the near 
future. Division 4 now hns twentv- 
five members awaiting tin- degrees. 
John HroAvn, a hard working mem- 
ber of Division Wilis present, but 
declined to make an address until a 
later date. It is plettsont to Dote. 
MlSt old war horses like Thomns 
I,iingnti ami Thomns Dignan are now 
attending regularly. 

PURE ARTICLES 



Th 

pon« 
Doj i 
,i. ii 

O'I'.r 
I'l.ih 



Manufactured in Three Bl| 
Plants of Mlrsch Bros. 
Company. 



Louisville is coming to the front 
as the home of pure food plants. A 
mode] plant is that of Hirsch Broth- 
ers Company, at the southwest cor- 
ner of Fourteenth ami Grnyaon 

Street!. The eomgMtny manufactures 
vinegar, cider, sauces, catsups, mus- 
tard, pickles and various table condi- 
ments. The I/ouisvillc' plant em- 
ploys 200 people, and SO per cent, 
of them are Irish and Catholics. 

A visitor to the plant is surprised 
at the extreme eMMlHneoe to be 
found on every hand. Kvery article 
used is of the purest, and best. No 
refuse matter is allowed to remain 
around to ferment ami breed dis as 
germs. The floors are as clean ns u 
dining room table should be, and 
nowhere in the plant is there nny 
evidence of dirt or untidiness — the 
Messrs. Hirsch will nut pnrmll it. 

The. officers of the company ar- 
David Hirsch. President; Hen 1'. 

Hirsch, Vice President; Don K- 

Hirsch. Secretary: l.ouis H. Birsch, 
Secretary and General Manager. The 
business, of course, legau in a smail 
way. Init such excellent products 
were placed upon the market Hint 
the Louisville plant had to l»- con- 
tinually enlarged to it-s present pro- 
portions. An interesting f.nture con- 
nected with the plant is the em- 
ployes' dining room. The company 
has furnished and equipped n 
spacious apartment, where the 2(S> 
employee take their noon day nie-il 
and can enjoy ft in comfort. 

HirHch Brothers Company have 
two other large plants— one at Pitts- 
burg ami another nt New Orleans, 
nnd all are flourishing. 

TRAINING snows RESULTS, 



The recent disaster in Ohio has 
caused school principals nnd super- 
intendents all over the world to ex- 
aminu more closely into the condi- 
tions of their respective school*. Hev. 
Brother James, President, of St. 
Xavler's College, in this city, made .1 
test a few days ago anil with sur- 
prising result*. There were more 
than 500 boys in th.i building, but 
so perfectly were they drilled that 
it was emptied in one ami three- 
quarter minute*. 

REAL ST vi i sm ansiiip. 



Hon. William F. Klalr, Repre- 
sentative from Lexington, is one of 
the shlnlnK lights In the lower house 
of the Kentucky Legislature. In 
fact Just now he Is the Democratic 
leader, and during the present ses- 
sion has displayed statesmanship of 
a high order. He Is the best par- 
liamentarian In the House and keeps 
things lively all the time. Some day 
he will go higher in the councils of 
bis party. 



That or., I in (leveland, O.. Wns 

Almost Daplkatod in 
Thb, nty. 



Work of Itcformcrs Hum Sot lb-en 
Conducive to Safety in 
Schools. 



Police l*-|iaruiicnt N^smU Special 
Airing For Bent-lit of 
Public. 



BULLITT'S FRIEND IN THE TOILS 



Isotiisvillc people have reason to 
lie thankful that this city was not 
visited by a holocaust us fearful a* 
that of the recent one in Cleveland. 
Only a few of the people in the im- 
mediate, neighborhood of the George 
Tinsley school, where the accident 
occuri-'d, and the members of the 
Louisville School Board, are In on the 
secret. The daily newspapers, of 
course, heard of the alfair, but made 
no conuncnt. The city printing con- 
tract for tire current year bus not 
been awarded, but after that thn 
daily press will make the fur fly. 

A commit tc,- from tin- Louisville 
School Hoard i.s now investigating 
the burning of the, boiler in the 
George Tinsley school, at Preston 
and Orm-sby avenue, on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 2s, and the necessary closing 
■ •r the school for a week. The School 
Hoard's commit live is now engaged in 
uu endeavor to find out why this 

happened. 

His Political Aeeidelic.y, P. G. 
t'oker, and the other reformers in 
the hoard insisted on changing jan- 
itors at that, .school about January 1. 
As a result the Tinsley school got 
a new janitor. The former janitor 
was dismissed, and the new one en- 
tcr,-d upon his duties. Six days after 
th" celebration of Washington's 
birthday the boiler blew up, the 4U0 
children 'were dismissal f ( ,r a week, 
and an additional tux of $l,luo was 
placet! on tin- taxpayers of Louisville. 
No attempt, to place the blame will 
be made until the iuvostiguting COW 
mlttee gets ready to report. It ma,, 
not reflect on the janitor, but the 
fact that tile lives of tun children 
were endangered by a reform School 
Hoard docs not redound to the credit 
of the alleged reformers. That the 
school was closed, that |t)0 lives were 
endangered. Unit the boiler w a 
ruined, can not be denied The peo- 
ple are anxious for that Investigating 

committee to report. 

Poor, patient Louisville people are 
waiting for pure water. Ismk at the 
produot furnished now. .Ninny 
charges of graft and corruption were 
made against, the old Louisville 
Water CompBliy. lb-formers changed 
the whole thing, but a little light 
shone Into the office on 'Ihird streel 
will show that conditions have not 
improved. The light can b turned 
on if the public wants it, despite the 
silem-e of the daily papers. 

Silence has been maintained re- 
garding the men who have been re- 
cently placed on the pay rcdls of the 
police and fire departments. It is 
rumored, ami the rumor bears the 
•tamp of authenticity, that one of 
tin- new ]K>lic<men has been dodging 
the police for several years. It is 
said that a warrant charging him 
with ail offense that calls for hang- 
ing in Kentucky is out against him. 
When wjll it be served . 

W. Marshall ISullitt's friend. Rob- 
ert Turner. Is in the toils once more. 
Turner was an adherent and spy for 
the FusioniSts, tint before he fin- 
ished liis work was summoned to the 
Juvenile Court on the charge of 
m-glecting his family. In a controv- 
ersy In the Court House Marshall 
Bullitt contended that Turner wns a 
perfn't gentleman. Turner disap- 
peared before be was brought lo trial 
for contempt of court. Now lie comes 
from Winchester, guarded by Deputy 
Sheriffs, nnd on n warrant thnt 
charges him with grand larceny. 

It might In- said right now that th" 
Democrats who had fallen into a 
"state of innocuous d< suet tide," as 
G rover Cleveland would say. are be- 
ginning to organize for the welfare 
of their homes, their city. State and 
nation, nnd when the next election 
day rolls around they will have the 
sup|s>rt of all people who have good 
government at heart, and who hold 
civic weal above party affiliation. 

FORTY HOURS ADORATION, 



The Forty Hours' adoration will 
begin at the late mass nt St. Cecilia's 
church tomorrow. The altars have 
been decorated for the occasion and 
t,n excellent musical proRrammo h.is 
been arranged. The Bev. Father A. 
J. Brady will celebrate the high mass 
that opens the solemn ceremonies. 
Tomorrow will also witness the 0 pee- 
ing of the same devotions at Holy 
Bosary Academy, on Ormsby avenue, 
between Fourth and Fifth. 



LEBANON LAMBS' WORK. 

The Ladles' Aid Society of St. 
Augustine's church, Lebanon. Is do- 
ing valuable work. On the first 
Monday In March they held their 
annual County Court day dinner and 
had a big crowd to entertain. On 
the evening of the following day they 
gave a euchre at the Y. M. I. hall 
and entertained an enormous crowd. 



HONOR FtHlMF.lt HKSIDPNT. 



The Right Rev. Shanley, Bishop 
of Fargo, North Dakota. was 
tendered a big reception when he 
visited his old home at Albion N. 
Y., last week. The Mayor of the 
town presided at the meeting held in 
the prelate's honor. It was flfty-pdr 
years Blnce Bishop Shanley had V ' 
Red his native heath. 





Go Where You Get the Best. 

ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL 

Sixth and Court Place. 

This old and well known establishment is up 
to date and modern in every respect. Has 
been completely renovated and transformed 
in every department. Most centrally located 
and only a few minutes' walk to all theaters. 



* RESTAURANT AND CAFE. > 

JOSEPH B. KliYfiR, Proprietor. 



ammmrommmmmmmm rommmmmmmmmmmg 



F. B. H0R8TMANJ 



WM. P. BANNON, Prosldtnt. 



]. P. CUNNINGHAM. Sfc. & Trsss. 



Standard Wall 
Plaster Company 



INOOKPOHATKU 



Manufacturers of 



"STANDARD" 



Wall Plaster 



M. J. WINN, 

MAKER 

GENTLEMEN'S 
GARMENTS. 

517-519 FOURTH AVENUE, SECOND FLOOR. 



Factory: Floyd and A Streets. 

TELEPHONE HOME 951. CUMB. 464 SOUTH 



■DKAI-KK IN 



1 1 OFFICE 508 W. JEFFERSON g 



pChoice Wines and Liquors | 
and Fancy Groceries.! 

Try our Leading Brands of Wines and Liquors 
Eg and our F"ull Line of Imported and Domestic 

£~ Oigan. Kvcrvthing new and clean. 

B 

HOMB PHONB 4;i74. 

Is. W. COR. FIFTH AND GREEN STS.l 

iaiiiiiUiiiiiaiauiuaiiuaiiii uaumiiiiaaiiuaiaaiiuiai^ 



HARRY B. DRIVER, President. 



WALTER RATCLIFFE, Secretary 



DOMESTIC LAUNDRY 
COMPANY. 

HIGH GRADE LAUNDRY WORK. 



Our method of laundering gives a finish 
not equaled by any laundry in the city. 



BOTH PHONES 1720 



517 FIFTH STREET. 



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ELECTRIC MOTORS and GENERATORS 



ICE MACHINERY. 

ELEVATORS, PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 



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APOSTLE 



Of Brln Will Be Honored Tues- 
day B] the Loyal 
IrlHli. 



A POW More Fact! About St. 

Patrick ami His Life'i 
Work. 



Was H Figure in History anil 
Lett Impress on the 

w orld. 



SPENT SIXTY YEARS ON MISSION 



Next Tuesday will be St. Patrick s 
day. and wherever there are Irish 
the day will be celebrated In some 
way. Wherever it is possible Cath- 
olic Irish men and women and their 
Children Will attend mass. Possibly 
those who have to work during the 
day will go to hear his panegyric 
preached during the evening at one 
of the Catholic churches. Others mas- 
attend a social celebration, but all 
will wear the green. 

Hero In America we find people 
of every creed wearing the sham- 
rock, or some other design on St. 
Patrick's day. There are some peo- 
ple who regard St. Patrick as a myth. 
One learned (T) principal of a cer- 
tain Kentucky high school invited 
an intelligent Irish resident of the 
same town to address his pupils on 
St. Patrick's day and relate to them 
the legend of St. Patrick. "No." 
said the Irishman. "I will not relate 
the legend, but I will relate what 
history shows. I will tell the hoys 
and girls the truth." He did It. too. 

Homer and Virgil wrote centuries 
before St. Patrick was born, yet they 
are not regarded as myths. St. Pat- 
rick has not only left the world his 
writings, but he has put an Indelible 
Impress on his people that time will 
never efface. 

St. Patrick was born In Gaul, near 
what is now Boulogne-sur-mer. 
France. In the year 373. A. D. His 
father. Calphurnlas. was a nobleman 
and the son of Potltlus. a Prince of 
the church as well as of the State. 
St. Patrick's mother was Conchessa, 
daughter of another noble family, 
and a woman noted for her piety. 
She was a sister of St. Martin of 
Tours. 

It Is only natural to believe that 
young Patrick, or "Succat" as he was 

is given 




FLOOR-FIX FOR FLOORS. 



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Learn What Work is and What 
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Poverty i* No Disfrraee and 
Little Merchant* Become 
Thrlftv. 



Former Little Vendera Who 
llu\e Arisen to Eminence 
in America. 



GOVS. BURKE AND BRADY CASES 



LOUISVILLE VARNISH CO. 



LOUISVILLE. 



illy christened, 
advantage. 



A Physician's Prescription 

Is based upon drugs of a certain standard and purity. 
Hence it is important that your prescription be filled by 
skilld pharmacists. 

RADEMAKER DRUG CO., 

TWO STORES: SSgJf iSS g«r 

At our store onlv drugs of the highest quality and tested 
strength are dispensed. You will make a saving of 25 to 
50 per cent in prices. Your order will have prompt atten- 
tion, skilled attention, the best attention. 

E Water Bottles. Syringes, Trasses, Toilet Soaps Perfu 



Are all sold by us at anti-trust cut-rate prices. We 
offer at anti-trust prices all of the well-kDo wn brands of Ken- 
tucky Whiskies, bottled in bond, among which are 

OLD STONE, OLD JORDAN, OLD TAYLOR, KENTUCKY DEW. 

Pure Old Port and Sherry Wine, 25c a quart; $1 per gallon. 
Fine Whisky $2 and $4 per gallon; pints 25c and 60c. 

MAIL OHDKHW HOLICITED, 

^tiiUiiiaiiiiiiilliuilUuiiiiiMiiUiiiiii liMiMU UliiliiUli 



Voir. C-hOvti 23)1. 



L _^ 



DR. J. T. CHAWK, 

Veterinary Infirmary and 
Horse Shoeing Forge. 

SCIENTIFIC AND PRACTICAL HORSE SHOEING 

Horses Called For anil Delivered. 

OFFICE AND FORGE, 913415 SEVENTH ST. 



In those days the Irish tribes were 
marauders and dealt In slaves. One 
of these bands visited the villa In 
which St. Patrick and his parents 
dwelt, killed the parents and carried 
off Patrick and several other young 
men as slaves. Patrick was then 
sixteen years old. He was taken to 
Ireland and forced to herd swine. 

Passing over his six years of cap- 
tivity, one finds that he has escaped 
and returned to France. 

His six years among the pagans 
had left a lasting Impression on him. 
He loved the people and their good 
traits, hut longed to see them accept 
the truths of Christianity. This he 
endeavored to make his life's work. 
He began to prepare himself for the 
taBk at once and his piety and fervor 
attracted the attention of the older 
and more experienced doctors of the 
church. 

He was sent on several successful 
missions and aided St. flermanus In 
stamping out the Pelagion heresy in 
Briton. He was appointed Bishop by 
St. Celestlne, then the Pope of Rome, 
and was consecrated at Turin when a 
little over forty years old. Many 
years he devoted to the study of re- 
ligion and the Bclence before he set. 
out for his apostolic mission to Ire- 
land. 

Suffice It to say that he was fifty- 
nine years old when he landed on the 
coaBt of Ireland and began to preach 
the gospel.- In the name of the 
Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, 
using the shamrocks that he plucked 
from the ground to illustrate his 
teachings of the triune Ood. 

'St. Patrick met with success every- 
where, and strange to relate, Ireland 
Is the only country that did not shed 
the blood of at least some of those 
Christians who went to evangelHie It. 

From his flfty-nlnth to his one 
hundred and twentieth year 8t. 



*0R SALE BY 



PEAS LEE-GAU LB " RT COMPANY 



Patrick preached to the the people 
of Erin. Ixing before his death the 
whole nation had been Christianized 
and March 17, 438, A. D., 
he left a land filled with churches, 
monasteries, convents, shrines, seats 
of learning, ploiiB men and women 
and aye, even saints. 

St. Patrick's body was burled at 
Downpatrtck. but his spirit of faith 
Is still in the hearts of the people 
he labored t.<. save. 



XKW ( W\H STOKi:. 



Enterprising William Mc- 
kinley to Engage In 
Big Business. 



About two weeks from the present 
time William McKlnley, veteran serv- 
ant of the people or Jefferson county 
and city of Louisville, will open the 
handsomest cigar store in the city 
of I»uisville. His quarters are to be 
In the building at the southeast cor- 
ner of Fifth and Market streets. 
Artisans and decorators are now at 
work on the Interior of the building, 
and as rapidly as possible the new 
show cases and fixtures are being 
Installed. 

Will McKlnley is one of the clev- 
erest men In the State, and belongs 
to real, old Irish-American stock. His 
ancestors were among the white pio- 
neers In Kentucky, and he shows his 
birth and breeding In his conduct 
at all times. For years he served 
In the County Clerk's office as County 
Treasurer, and then was Cashier in 
the City Tax Receiver's office for six 
or eight years. Mac was always a 
stickler on dally balances and never 
left the office for the day until every 
cent had been accounted for. 

In his new venture he will carry 
the best line of tobacco, foreign and 
domestic cigars of all the standard 
brandB, and will also keep a full sup- 
ply of the leading newspapers, mag- 
azines and periodicals. As clever a 
man as William McKlnley, and on 
such a prominent corner as his es- 
tablishment Is to be located, forms a 
combination that secures success In 
advance. 



It is not a bad plan to cultivate the 
friendship of newsboys. Nobod> 
knows when one of these little 
merchants will land at the top. If 
you know Johnny or Jimmy Fll- 

ni. Mose Kpsteln or Jake lilrsh- 
berg, win their friendship. There is 
lots of competition in their business, 
and early in life they lenrn to take 
advantage of every point. Boys da 
not arise from fieds at 3 or 4 o'clock 
In the morning, and perhaps spend 
the entire day peddling their wares 
for pleasure. It is a necessity. But 
these boys learn something. They 
have it hammered Into them. Some 
of Louisville's leading business men 
sold papers In years gone by, anil 
every State la the I'nlon can point 
with pride to many men who wero 
formerly newsboys. But there an- 
two principal cases In point. 

A party of waifs or the East Side. 
In New York City, arrived In Tipton. 
Indiana, one day about forty-eight 
years ago. They had been sent there 
by the Eastern Children's Aid So- 
ciety. They were Intended for fhn 
homes of farmers who would care 
for them. Judge John Oteen, one of 
the leading citizens of the Indiana 
town, called on the man In charge of 
the new arrivals. Said the Judge: 

"I want the ugliest, rapK>dest, 
most friendless youngster in the lot.'' 

The man cast an ey e over his 
charges and picked out a freckled, 
rod haired little chap i.amed John 
Brady, better known as "Iteddy." 

"This one 1s the ugliest one thnt 
is left. Judge," he said, "and the 
raggedest. He has not a friend In 
the world outside of the Newsboys' 
Lodging House. There is one that Is 
just as ugly, and Just as ragged and 
Just as friendless, and that Is Andy 
Burke, but he has gone to the next 
town." 

The Judge gave one look at 
"Roddy" Brady and accepted him on 
the spot. Thirty-one years later An- 
drew H. Burke, the ugly boy wno 
had gone on to the next town, was 
elected Governor of North Dakota. 
Seven years after Burke's election 
John Green Brady, formerly known 
as "Reddy." became Governor of 
Alaska. 

The whole country — and a good 
part of the world, too — has heard of 
Gov. Brady, of Alaska. There aro 
dozens of other men who hav« 
reached high places who began as 
newsboys. It has not been by any 
wonderful turn of chance that these 
men have succeeded. In every case 
It has been by the restless energy, 
the dogged perseverance, the worldly 
knowledge that characterize so many 
of the newsboys of today, added to 
natural shrewdness and ambition. 

Take Brady's case, for example. 
He was only ten years old when the 
Children's Aid Society sent him 
West, yet he had been earning his 
living for years without a friend or 
relative to help him. After Judge 
Green gave him a helping hand he 
worked his way through college. 
There he chopped wood, made fires, 
and rang the bell. In addition to 
working as a tutor. Then he decided 
to become a man of power and In- 
fluence. 

If one should ask either Govs. 
Brady or Burke for the secret of 
their respective successes they 
would doubtless say: "When a boy 
has had to work be knows the 
value of money." 



3 

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MANUFACTURERS 01- 



| FINE CLOTHING. & 



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Sole Manufacturers of the 

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Machinery Built and Repaired. 

Castings of all kinds made and repaired. 
Repairing promptly attended to. 

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The catacombs of Rome are 580 
miles in extent, and it is estimated 
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Christiana and martyrs. 



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And thereby keep at home at least a part of the enormous amounts that arc jh! 
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HJinit latirr became known as the 
"Annals of the Four Masters." Be- 
sides these he wrote and compiled 
"The Succession of The Irish Kinjrs," 
the "Book of Conquests" nnd the 
"Martyrology of Oonepnl." The la*t 
three named were completed before 
an attempt was made to compile the 
"Annals of the Four Maslers.'' 

Oonary O'CIery, a brother of 
Michael," was a layman. Little else 
is known of hvm save that lie assisted 
his brother in writing and compiling. 
Otsgory O'CIery was the la-»t hUlorian 
of the O'Donnells. Previous to his 
collu-lmratiiin with Michael and Con- 
ary ho had wrilten a life of Hugh 
Roe O'Donnell. Fearfeasa O'Mul- 
eonry, the fourth of the proup, was 
descended from the Koscomnion 
family of that name, and was the 
historian of Clan O'Connor- 

'Hie Franciscan abbey where the 
Four Masters made their headquar- 
ters nnd did their compiling stood at 
the head of Donegal Hay. Today .1 
is only a dismantled ruin. In liepin- 
nin# the "Annals" Brother Mielun I 
pointed out to his confreres that it 
would redound to the "(ilory of (Jod 
ami tin- honor of Krin." 



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PURE ICE CREAM, 

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Special Rates for Parties and Outings. 

5510 I£. MARKET STREET 



Something About tin* Four 
.Mitstt-rs ami Their <;r<at 
Work. 



Itoiiiancc Itclitnd tin- Lino That 

Produced tin' Famed 
Chief. 



They Sprung From Lontf Line 
of Hereditary Irish 

Historian-.. 



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As each s\Kvessi\ c Patrick's diiv 
rolls round anil we Irish-Americans 
feel 1 lie rich, nd blood of our lrisli 
ancestors flowing? in faster streams 
through our arteries we seek for 

si tliinf? new in St. Patrick's life 

and eliarncter to be proud of. 
Whether laymen i>r pri nts, tin- Irish 
are essentially preachers ami lejsch- 
ers. Their inherited MIMNMitjf makes 
then this way. If they huvc knowl- 
edge, humhh- though it.' may be, they 
wnnrt others to enjoy it. If nn IrUi- 
BUka appreciates the zeal. Ihe failli. 
the fervor, the self-sacrifice of St. 
IVitriek, he wants the whole wor' 1 
to ^hnre in his appreciation. The 
Irish are not stlfish in their jny% 
thotiRh they may, keep their sor- 
rows to themselves. Many an Irish 
heart is breaking? under a terrible 
weight of iwoe, yet one would novr 
know of ihe diffsniltW'S under whii-'.i 
that heart laboreil. Hut in seeking? 
for somcthini? new about St. l'ntriel; 
one is Invariably brought tip against 
the Inevitable "Annals of the Four 
Masters," and from their compil- 
ations has been evolved the history, 
"All that is known of St. Patrick " 
The qm-stion naturally arises, who 
were the Pour Masters? Compara- 
tively few Irish-Americans can an- 
swer. Yet It is worth while to ascer- 
tain and to remember that they, too. 
had the spirit of the present day sou, 
of Krin; that they desired to give to 
the world a true account of Ireland 
and her people. 

The Four Masters were Michael 
O'CIery, Chief; his brother Connrv 
O'CIery, a distant relative Cugory 
O'CIery, and Fearfeasa O'Mulconry. 
Thcir\ work was begun January 2:.', 
1C32, A. D., and was concluded Aug- 
ust 10, 1036. Their hendq,uarters 
were in the Convent of the Francis 
can friars in County Donegal, and 
from there they and their assistants 
scoured every monastery and school 
in Ireland for fragments and scraps 
of the country's history from th 
Deluge to the yeaf 1616, A. D. it was 
a lo«g, arduous and underpaid task, 
althwigh the great Chieftain O'Gara 
furnished the means for carrying on 
the work. Fergal O'Oara at that tim 
ruled what is now the County Sligo. 

As far back as the history of Ire- 
land can be traced each tribe or clan 
had its ollamh (pronounced ollav) or 
historian. This office was hereditary 
In every Xlileslan clan. It came 
about in a romantic way that the 
0'Clery's became the historians of 
Tyrconnell. Originally the O'Clery's 
were descended from one of the 
Kings of Connaught. In the thir- 
teenth century they were dispossesed 
by the DeBurgos and other Norman 
adventurers nnd sought safety in 
other parts of Ireland. 

About the year 1380, A. D., one of 
the O'CIery family, whose antece- 
dents had settled near Tyrawley, set 
forth to seek his fortune in the 
country of the O'Donnells. His given 
name was Cormac. On his journey 
he sought succor at the Abbey of 
Aasaroe. The good monks discovered 
that he was a young man of more 
than ordinary spirit and intelligence, 
lie was Invited to remain at the mon- 
astery aB professor of canon and 
civil law. Cormac O'CIery agreed to 
remain for a time at least. While 
there he made the acquaintance of 
"Matthew O'Spningin. the historian of 
the clan of O'Donnells. Matthew was 
much impressed with Cormac O'CIery 
and offered to make him his son in- 
low, and provided that in even* of 
male issue the child and his de- 
scendants would continue to be the 
historians of the O'Donnell clan. Cor- 
mac accepted the bargain, and from 
that match-making sprung the line 
of O'Clerys that finally direloped 
Michael O'CIery and two others of t he 
Four Masters. 

it is unnecessary to trace the. line 
down from J380 through several cen- 
turies*. IiCt It suffice for the present 
to know that Michael O'CIery, who 
on account of his religious belief and 
patriotic tendencies had to leave Ire- 
land, became a member of the Fran- 
ciscan order ait Louvaln, France, in 
1607. He was known as Brother 
Michael. A few years later he was 
sent back to Ireland by Father John 
(Vilgan to collect liiaterial for "The 
Lives of the Irish Saints.*' He did 
this work admirably and also began 
collecting materials for the work 



MV HUSBAND. 



He comes ns a lover, with soft, noise- 
less feet, 

And I listen and wait for him, 

speechless and sweet. 
He comes dowt the pathway, his 

heart all iil'Iow; 
I pi'-p from my insement, and wntc'u 

— for I know, 
ny the light in his eyes and the 

smile on his face, 
All trcinblin.r. cpeetant. all shining 

with trac? 
Of the same love soul-lighted, thai 

blessed me in youth. 
That he loves »ie as ever, still truly 

as truth. 

ne is constant and faithful, I know 

he is mine; 
In the. sadness of sorrow, through 

shadow and shine. 
He hath smoothed my caprice with n 

kindness that told 
How precious his love, more than 

rubies and (fold; 
And often nnd often, far back in 

the years, 
I know that, my warwardm ss grieved 

him to tears; 
And now. us I wait for him, cm I 

forget 

That he love.s me. and loves me more 
tenderly yet? 

How steadfast in purpose, how pure 

in his heart. 
And that I, poor ami helpless, should 

live ns its part. 
When he took me and blessed n.e, 

and calh-d me bis own, 
And now 'or his bread, do I give 

htm n stone? 

0 no! for I love him as woman can 

love. 

1 know of his olive branch I am the 

dove; 

And tranquil nnd happy and joyous 
my life. 

As I feel that he loves me— .that I 
am his wife. 

— Alphonse Dnyton. 

.M)A\ OF AIM . 



New History of famous 
Heroine by French 
Scholar. 



M. Annt-olc France, of Paris, ha 
written a new life of .leunne d'Arc, 
or nn she is commonly called in 
lOirglish, Joan of Arc. Many Catholi.-s 
recufivi/.e her ns a saint. 'Hie Kng 
INI™ burnfid her bOOBUM they .con- 
sidered the poor girl a witch. Tin 
new French historian suys: "She, wai' 
a saint with all the attributes ol 
sanctity during the fifteenth cen- 
tn ry. She had visions, and theise vis- 
ions were neither pretended nor 
counterfeit. She really believed that 
-In- could hear voica which spoke to 
her, and which came not from human 
lil*-." 

Jeanne d'Arc, M. France holds, was 
a saint of her own time and not a 
prophet. The voices she heard spoke 
of tl-.e fifteenth century and tut cir 
cuinstanccs with which she was 
familiar. She had none of those in 
teliectual qualities with which some 
historians have credited her, nor did 
she possess marvelous military tal- 
enUs. Pious Frenchmen in 1428 re- 
garded her nr. a devout girl inspired 
by Cod. There was nothing? incred- 
ible in that. In announcing than sh • 
had a revelation from St. Michael 
concerning? the war she inspirei} the 
men to arms and citizens of Or- 
igins with as much confidence as 
would hove been communicated *o 
th - triKups of the Loire in the winter 
of 1871 by the Inventor of a smoke- 
less powder or an improved cannon. 
What could have been expected from 
science in 1871 was expected from 
religion in 1428. 

Jeanne, absorbed in h>r prayer-, 
could not see the. enemy. She did 
not know the ronds; she took no nc- 
count of the number of men cnignged, 
nor of the height of walls, nor the 
breadth of trenchee. It is a common 
thing in our days for military men 
to discuss the maid's tactical genius. 
She had but a single plan of tactics 
— ito prevent her men from swearing 
or falling into dissolute habits. She 
believed that they would be de- 
stroyed by their own sins, but if they 
fought in a state of innocence they 
would surely be victorious. That was 
all her military science, with the ex- 
ception of the' fact that she was ab- 
solutely without fear. She showed 
the sweetest and proudest courage. 
She was more valiant, more constant, 
more generous than her men, and so, 
worthy to lead them- 

KEASOXAIM.i: IM'KHKNTE. 



A little girl's papa had been very 
111 with appendicitis and had lain for 
many days in the darkened room 
after the doctors had come and re- 
moved his appendix. The little girl 
had been told to be very quiet and 
very good, with the pormlse that she 
should go In to see her papa at the 
earliest possible moment. At last 
she was permitted a brief Interview. 
She stood perfectly still gazing at 
her father with loving eyes, but when 
the nurse came to take her away she 
held hack a moment. 

"Haven't I been very quiet, papa?"| 
"Yes," whispered the fona parent. 
"And haven't I been very good?" 
Her father admitted It. 
"Then won't you do me a favor, 
papa?" 

"Certainly. What Is It. child?" 
"Let me see the baby." 



I EDWARD J. O'BRIEN & CO., 

LEAF TOBACCO 
BROKERS 



1032 WEST MAIN ST.. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



FACTORIES: 



PADUCAH. KY. 
FULTON. KY. 



BARDWELL, KY. 
DYCUSBURG, KY. 



^ ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



WASHINGTON 



As Ho Whs. Scars nnd All, Paint- 
ed Ity a Loyal Con- 
temporary. 



Pounder of Democracy is the 

Author of the Word 

Picture. 



One Man That All the World 
vlij;lit Take Pattern 
After. • 



JUSTICE WAS MOST INFLEXIBLE 



Every American boy and girl looks 
upon WashingUm as a hero. So he 
was, but many see him only In the 
glamour of history. Not all of them 
have read of him as he was spoken 
of by his oonltemporari s and fellow- 
patriots. Thomas Jefferson, one of 
his colleagues in the fight for Amer- 
ica's independence, and who, like 
WOlllI IH In HI, became President, who 
really foundid the doctrine of 
Democracy in the United Sates, had 
this l.i .-vay of 1 he illustrious founder 
of our country: 

"I think I knew (jen. Washington 
intimately and thoroughly, anil were 
1 called on to delineate his character 
it should be in firms like these: His 
mind was great and powerful, with- 
out beitif? of the very first order; his 
penetration strong, though not so 
Mate n« that of a Newiton, Hacon or 
Ijocke; and as far as he *aw, no 
judgment was ever sounder. It was 
slmv in operation, h"ing little aided 
by invention or imagination, but sure 
in conclusion. 

"He was incapable of fear, meeting 
personal danger with the calmest 
unconcern. Perhaps the strongest 
feature in his character was pru- 
dence; never acting until every cir- 
cumstance, every consideration, was 
maturely weighed; refraining if he 
saw a doubt, but when one decided 
going through with his purpose, what- 
ever iJbstaeles oji]>ose<l. His integrity 
wan most pure, jits justice the. most 
(inflexible I Oiave ever known, no 
motives of interest or consanguinity, 
of frie ndship or hatred, being able to 
bias his decision. 

"His heart was not warm in its 
affeotions, but he cxoctli, calculated 
every man's value and gave him u 
solid esteem proportioned to it. His 
person, you know, was fine, his 
stature exactly what one could wish; 
liis deportment easy, erect, and noble; 
the best horseman of his age, an. I 
the most graceful figure that could 
be seen on horseback. Although in 
the circle of his -friends, where he 
might be unreserved with safety, he 
took a free share in the conversation, 
hip colloquial talents were not abov,- 
mediocrity, possessing neither copi- 
ousness of ideas nor fluency of 
words. In public, when called on 
for a sudden opinion he was unready, 
short and embarrassed. Yet he wrote 
readily, rather diffusely, in an easy 
and correct style. This he had ac- 
quired by conversation with the 
world, for his education wan merely 
reading, writing and common arith- 
metic, to which he added surveying 
at a later day. 

"On the whole his character was 
in its mass perfect — in nothing bad, 
in f«iw points indifferent— and it may 
be truly said that never did nature 
and fortune combine more perfectly 
to make a man great, nnd to place 
him in the same constellation with 
whatever worthies have merited from 
man an everlasting remembrance. 
For his was the singular destiny and 
merit of leading the armies of his 
country through an ardous war for 
the establishment of its independ- 
ence; of conducting its councils 
through the birth of a government, 
new In its powers and principles, 
unrtil it had settled down into a quirt 
and orderly train; and of 
scrupulously obeying the laws 
through the whole of his career, 
civil and military, of which the his- 
tory of the world furnishes no other 
example." 

GARMENTS OP LONG AGO. 



Capital Paid up 
$500,000. 



Surplus and Profits 
$170,000. 



UNION 
NATIONAL 
BANK. 



Depository of Funds of the United States 




CLINT C McCLARTY. Pre»t. 
C. C. BICKEL, Vies- Prist. 



j. B. BROWN. Cathltr. 

C. N. MATTHEWS. Aid. Caihlir. 



Oldest National Bank in the South. 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK. 

H OF LOUISVILLE, KY. 

H Capital, $500,000. Surplus, $100,000 

M Act* as Wim BgHrt for National ftudtl lltj Oi 

collections, snd attends to mil maMera minuted to it «riUi prompt 
ne» and <.n the noM liberal tcrau solicit* Mcmmtsel Bsaks, 
LJ^ Hankcm. Corporation! Hen banti tod In dM dna li 

0 S. E. CORNER FIFTH AND MAIN. 



ESTABLISHED 1B42. 



BOTH PHONES 445. 



P. WINKLER'S SONS, 



INCOKI'OKATEl). 



Wholesale Grocers and Liquor Dealers. 

301 E. MARKET ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Frank A. Menne Factory, 



INCORPORATED 



National Candy Company, 

Manufacturers of 
EAGLE BRAND CONFECTIONS. 

WENZEL AND MAIN STS., LOUISV.LLE, KY. 



A new white •erg'e sutt for the 
South has collar and cuffs of »trlped 
black and write pongee. Th* nuit 1* 
sererely tailored. 



An advertisement appearing in a 
1709 London newspaper enumerated 
the f illowiner parmemt*, which hal 
been stolen: "A black silk petticoat, 
with a red and white calico bordci ; 
cherry colored stays, trimmed with 
blue, and silver; a red and dove col- 
ored damask gown, flowered with 
larpre itrees; a yellow satin apron, 
trimmed with white Persian; mttslin 
hendclothn, with crowfoot edping: 
double ruffles, with fine edging; a 
black silk furbelow scarf, and n 
spotted hood." The only item that 
probably will not appeal to the envy 
of the woman of today in this faa- 
cinatinfr list is the "crowfoot edfrlnp." 
For crows' feet have rather a rfnister 
significance for the modern woman. 



gimwmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmm^ 

H Transfer Line Established 1870. Warehouse Established 1898 2 

|Tabb's Storage Warehouse! 

I FREIGHT TRANSFER LINE. 

UP-TO-DATE WAREHOUSE 01* RAILROAD TRACK 2 
C. S. TABB & SON, proprietors. 

Our ware heuac in located on trock» within a few aquarra of »ix freight dc- 
»- pota. We have cam switched to our doors without charge, from all rail- 

ed roada entering l*>ui« ;ille. In thla way we are in a poaitioii to solicit 

K conaisnmenta of car oad Iota of all kind*, and guarantee satufactlon in 

ET. every particular. W e have twelve team« on the street and are prepared to 

|K haul anything. W. make a apceialty of rehandling. storing and distnbut- 

S£ ing mixed cars, or .-». aither in the city or to other depots. 

REFERENCE: .,ocal railway agents, trust companies and banks. We 
are now distributing for numerous large firma all over the country, 
c 8. TABB fit SON, Proprietors. 

Ss27'20 I^IF^'TE^IV'ril ST. 2 



BE SURE TO CALL FOR 

McKENNA 

WHISKY. 

IT IS ALWAYS PURE. 

H. McKenna, Distiller, Fairfield, Ky . 



WORK WELL. 



St. Louis Bcrtrand'a Debt 
Association 
ults. 




♦ I ♦<♦♦< M ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ MM t ♦♦ M ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ H ♦♦♦♦♦♦ t 



Gran W. Smith's Son, 

AL SMITH, Proprietor. 

Funeral Director and Embalmer;; 



Furnished for All 

809 W. JEFFERSON STREET.:; 

TELEPHONE 810. 

♦ ♦ t 



MMMMMMMMMMMM »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 



D. J. DOUGHERTY 



S. J. McKLLIOTT 



DOUGHERTY & McELLIOTT, j 
Funeral Directors and Erabalmers. 

Both Phones 29G8 CARRIAGES FURNISHED FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
All Ctllt Answered Promptly. Day or Night. 

1231 WEST MARKET STREET. 
4.+ »♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦: 



CUMBERLAND 123 



J. J. BARRETT S SONS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
AND EMBALMERS. 

838 East Main Street. 



1111 11 1 11 111 1 11 11111 1 1 1 1 1 1 inn 1 1 1 1 1 1 ts 

J. B. TRACY I* H. STRAUB 

BOTH PHONES »6»_. 

! TRACY & STRAUB i 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
...AND EMBALMERS. . 



^Wrfaasr - " i»3i w. market street. : 



♦ I 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 I I I I I H I 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I ' I I I I I I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 It 1 1 H I !■■ 

1 — ? 




THOMAS KEENAN, 
Funeral Director and Embalmer 

TELEPHONE 365. 

All calli promptly attended to, day or night. 
Carriage* furnished for all occasions. 

1225 W. MARKET ST. 



Independent of All jUndertakere. 

KATIE AGNES SMITH, 
LADY EMBALMER. 

Washing and Dr easing Ladies mod 

Children a Specialty. 

Offic- W. St. Catberins Bo»h D »~»n.* 

C. B. THOMPSON 

FLORIST 

ROSEBUDS A SPECIALTY 
FLORAL DESIGNS. 

632 FOURTH AVENUE. 




Yon can "stand pat'* on quality and real aa 
aured that you are getting your money's worth 
when ynu use our Diamoad Wall Plaster. It is 
not affected by zero weather if kept from f reeling 
two hours. 

Kentucky Wall Plaster Co., 

(INCORPORATED.) 
BOTH PHONES 2267 

Brook and River, - Louisville, Ky. 

Also operating the Hooaier Wall Pias- 
ter Plant, Jeffersonville, Ind. Phone 566 



All orders receive prompt attention and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 



HENRY HUNOLD 



DEALER IN 



Staple and Fancy Groceries 

A FIRST-CLASS SAMPLE ROOM 
IN CONNECTION. 
Old Whiskies a Specialty. 

540 W. WALNUT. 



HERRMANN BROS. 



-IafPOH 



FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Distillers and Wholesale Deal- 
ers in Finest Brands rf Ken- 
tucky Whiskies especially 

PEARL OF NELSOS 

BOTTLBD IN BOND. 
IfO. 234 Sliifc Street 



JAMES A. WELSH, 

PLUMBING AND 
GAS FITTING. 

Repair Work Promptly Attended To. 
HOME PHONE 6382. 

stree: 



615 W. OAK 



T. 




All the new Fall Bt 
Ufj i lit r* 



shapes 



IIROOKLYN IN LINK. 



The Ancient Order of Hibernian* 
expect to surpass any former efforts 
in the wtay of a St. Patrick's day 
parade this year. No lens than 20,000 
members will be in Hne, and an inter- 
esting feature iwlli be the military 
escort, composed of 500 Catholic hoys 
of the First Brigade. The boya are 
thoroughly drilled and will be com- 
manded (by Col. Crawford and Major 
Moore. Their awn military band and 
drum corps will accompany the boys. 



The officers and collectors of the 
St. Louis* Bertram! Church Debt Pay- 
ing Association met on Tuesday even- 
ing' at the convent. The meeting wan 
a very gratifying one indeed, show- 
ing that, despite the temporary dull- 
ness in business, circles, interest in 
the work of reducing the church debt 
does not. flag. Twenty-six new con 
.trilnrtor* were added to the roll 
during January, and many promised 
to join or resume their payments in 
Whe near future. 

Since the last monthly meeting the 
annual reports were distributed. Due 
to the co-operation of the former 
Prior, Very Hev. B. F. Logan, the 
aswu-ittit'i.m wus able to pay *H,M'.ti.C,-J 
on the principal and interest of the 
church debt during the year 1907, 
Fatiher Logan turning over to the 
association some bequests that had 
been left to the church for the liqui 
dation of the debt. 

The resignation of Joseph Mor 
thorst. was received and accepted 
with deep regret. Mr- Morthorat. 
was one. of the organizers of the 
Church Debt Association, a faithful 
and conscientious collector, and his 
retiring from active work in BOB DOC 
t.ron with the association is regretted 
by ell of his associates. 

Treasurer J. F. Wagner, who had 
been under the weather for some 
.weeks, was present at the meeting 
but stated he is still feeling the ef- 
fects of an attack of grip. 

RIGHT SPIRIT. 



Louisville Saloon Men Are 
In ravor of 
Methods. 



Way should a man swear in a bar 
room? Why should the proprietor 

have lascivious pictures on nls walls? 
Both these questions were freely and 
'thoroughly discussed at the meeting 
of the Mm mil Protective Association 
Friday afternoon of last week. 

It was the annual election of offi- 
cers, and those chosen were J- W. 
Hoardman, re-eleeted President for 
the third term; Al Kolb. Vice Presi- 
dent; Frank Mctirath, Recording Sec- 
retary; Charles A. Hill, Financial 
Secretary; Henry Bosquet, Trea> 
urer. 

The •< lection of officers was a 
minor* matter. The conduct of the 
saloons was the main 1 business con- 
sidered. Every man pledged himself 
to remove lewd and lascivious pic- 
tures from his place of business. 
More than 90 per cent, of those 
present had no such pictures. The 
members also pledged themselves t«. 
combat and eradicate cursing and 
the use of profane language in 
saloons. They also pledged them- 
selves "to prevent any of their mem- 
bers f»T>m causing to be printed lit- 
erature of an obscene nature. 

The members present also pledged 
themselves to live up to every speci- 
fication or spirit and letter of the 
law as it now stands. Members of 
the Mutual Protective Association 
•re, for the most part, law abiding. 
Hereafter there will be few infrac- 
tions of the Sunday closing law. 

IRISH LECTURE. 



Gen. Michael Tlylan will deliver on 
address on Irish music at the Church 
of the Holy AngeK Cincinnati, Mon- 
iay evening, March 16. 



IMPORTANT. 

The Central Committee of the Cath- 
olic Knights of America has been 
colled to meet at St. Mary's Hail, 
Eighth anl Grayson streets, next 
Fliday night. 



COM PA NIKS ON PARADE. 



Both companies of the Catholic 
Knights of America, L'niform Bank, 
will drill at Phoenix Hill Hall next 
Tuesday night- They want all their 
friends' to attend. 



A.MKXDKI) CHARTER. 



Trinity Council, Y. M. [., has filed 
amended ortiicles this week by which 
it gets the right to buy, lease or 
mortgage property. The maximum 
bidcbtednen is fixed at $15,000. 



PICTURE FOR THE POPE, 

The new St. Joseph's Hospital ai 
Lexington is to be. photographed and 
one of the copies will be sent to Pone 
Pins X. M will be presented to ni« 
Hohms on the occasion of his jubilee. 



ANOTHER ( Hl ltCH 



Sacriligious thieves are active 
otgnin. This we-k St. Aloystus church, 
art Payne ami Cooper, was robbed of 
its altar linens and the poor box 
was rifled. The theft we* not dis- 
covered until the Rev. Father 
O'Orady entered the church the next 
morning. 

SUFFERS RELAPSE. 



The venerable Bishop Hoban, of 
Kansas City, who was reported con- 
valescing from pneumonia, suffered 
a relapse a few days ago. Though 
still confined to his bed. the condition 
of the prelate is not now considered 
dangerous. 

THOUSANDS HOMELESS. 



SOCIETY _DIRECTORY. 

A,. O. H. 

DIVISION L 
Meets on the Second and Fourth Fri- 
day Evenings of Each Month. 

President^John M. Mulloy. 

Vice President — Thomas Lawler. 

Recording Secretary — Thomas 
Keenan, Jr. 

Recording Sec.— Thos. Keenan, Jr. 

Financial Secretary — P. J. Cusick. 

Treasurer — Charles J. Finnegan. 

DIVISION 2. 
Meets on the First and Third. Fridav 
Evenings of Esch Month. 
President— Con J. Ford. 
Vice President— Dsn McKenna. 
Treasurer— Owen Keiran. 
Recording Secretary— Joseph T. 
Lynch. 

Financial Secretary— J. T. Keaney. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — James Bayers. 
Sentinel— William Nash. 



JUBILATION. 



Trinity Council Mas Two 
Causes Tor Sounding 
Pral 



DIVISION 3. 
Meets First and Third Thursdny 
Evenings Each Month, Seventeenth 
and Main Streets. 
President — Patrick T. Sullivan. 
Vice President — Martin Sheehan. 
Recording Secretary— L. J. Mackey. 
Financial Secretary— J. G. Hession. 
Treasurer — Daniel J. Dougherty. 
Sentinel— Thomas Noon. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— Patrick Begley. 

DIVISION 4. 
Meets Second and Fourth Monday*. 
Bertrand Hall, Sixth Street. 
President — John H. Hennessy. 
Vice President— Thomas Lynch. 
Financial Secretary- William J. 
Connelly. 

Recording Secretary — Frank P. 
Burke. 

Treasurer— Harry Brady. 
Sentinel— Michael McDermott. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — John Doolan. 

DIVISION 1, JEFFERSONVILLE. 
Meets on the First and Third Tues- 
days Each Month at Pfau's Hall. 
President — John Kinney. 
Vice President — John O. Cole. 
Treasurer — Bernard A. Coll. 
Recording Secretary — T. O'Hern. 
Financial Secretary — Chas. Roberts. 
Sentinel — Timothy D. Kenney. 
Marshal— William Dorsey, Jr. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— Bernard Coyle. 



MACKIN COUNCIL, 205. 
Meets Tuesday Evenings at Club 
House, 530 Twenty-sixth Street. 
President— Robert T. Burke. 
FirBt Vice President— Frank Lana- 
han. 

Second Vice President— Samuel 
Robertson. 

Recording Secretary— Austin E. 
Walsh. 

Corresponding Secretary— Thomas 
Bachman. 

Financial Secretary— Frank G, 
Adams. 

Treasurer — Dan Weber. 

Marshal — A. Andriott. 

Inside Sentinel— Patrick Duddy. 



United States ami their employer 4. 
They want to celebrate St. Patrick'* 
ibay. Since the financial stringency 
these men have lost a great deal of 
time, and still lose at least one day 
a week. Recently the shops have been 
closed >on Wednesday of each week. 
The Hibernian contingent would, like 
to celebrate St. Patrick's day, and 
since 'that falls on Tuesday, CjI. 
Theodore Curtis, Superintendent of 
Machinery, will probably be request- 
ed to chaisgV the day of closing from 
Wednesday to Tuesday. He knows 
and appreciates his men, and will 
undoubtedly grant their request. 



It is estimated by one of the man- 
agers of the association for Improv- 
ing the conditions of the poor that 
there are approximately 30,000 home- 
less men in New York today. Of 
these probably sixty per cent are 
non-residents. 



ANOTHER HANDSOME HOTEL. 



Owen Tyier, as tmstee of the Tyl-r 
estate, is preparing to erect a seven- 
story hotel at the northeast corner 
of Third and Jefferson streets. The 
building will be modern in every 
partiic.ulor, and 'the work will begin 
about July 1. Plans for the build- 
ing have been submitted and ac- 
cepted. 



WANT A CHANGE. 



I 



There are doubtless more men of 
Irish birth or parenltage employed 
in the local shops of the Louisville Sc. 
NasJhville Railroad Company than 
any other plant in this city. They 
are loyal ,0 church, Ireland, the 



QUITE A NICE AWARD. 

The Cafholic church is to recover 
more than $400,000 from the United 
States Government for claims in th • 
Philippines. Representative Cooper, 
of Wisconsin, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Insular Affairs, made an 
elaborate report on the bill. As a 
result the committee has recom- 
mended the allowance of $403,030.19. 

CONUNDRUMS. 

What flowers are there between a 
lady's nose and chin? Two-lips. 

Why is a kiss like a sermon? Be- 
cause it requires two heads and an 
application. 

Why should a man named Benja- 
min marry a girl named 'Annie? Be- 
cause he would then be Bennie- 
fltted, she Annie-mated! 

Why are stout gentlemen prone to 
melancholy? Because they are men 
of size (sighs). 

Why is a melancholy young lady 
the pkosantewt of all companions .' 
Because she is always a-musing. 

Why Is a professional thief very 
comfortable? Because he takes thinps 
easy. 

HOrsEHOI.O HINTS. 



The secret of cooking game is con- 
stant 'basting. It should be under- 
done and full of gravy. 

Pare tomatoes and cover with coid 
water 'for an hour before cookitv, 
and uhey will be less liable to turn 
dark after they are boiled. 

A tablespoonrful of vinegar add<d to 
a quart of kwnip oil will destroy the 
unpleasant odor if it is not caused by 
a burner in need of a thorough clean- 
ing. 

When boiling old potatoes, which 
are apt to go to a very dark color, 
put a tableapooniftil of milk into the 
water in which they are boiled and 
you will find they will be beautifullv 
white when cooked. 

A quick method of making bread 
crumbs is to put the crumbs from a 
stale tin loorf into a muslin bag, tie 
at the top ami rub irt gently wihh 
both hands for a few minutes. The 
bread will then be fine enough for 
any purpose. 

One oftens hears complaints that 
the boiler rusts and iron molds the 
olothes. To prevent this, as soon as 
the boiler is emptied rub well over 
with soap. This will not only pre- 
vent rust, rt will also help to make 
suds for the next boiling. 

If you have a fern that does not, 
grow fast enough, try mitrting the 
pot in hot water — not boiling, but 
too hot to bear the hand. This is 
especially good tor the beautiful 
large fern that resembles the «wi!rl 
aVrn that grows on some shady bill- 
side. 

To keep mice away from pantries 
and cupboards sprinkle cayenne pep- 
per on the shelves. In boxes and 
Wtardrobeai pjut lumps of camphor 
aanong the clothes, for mice dislike 
the smell orf It. The camphor must 
be renewed every now and then, for 
it evaporates in the air. 



Monday night Trinity Council cele- 
brated the silver jubilee of the or- 
ganization of the Y. M. 1. with a 
splendid gathering at its hall on East 
(rray street. James B. Kelly was 0,1 
hand to preside, and every "other of- 
ficer was in his place. Almost 200 
members of the council were in their 
seats when the gavel fell. It was 
a regular meeting night, but Presi- 
dent Kelly saw that only 
necessary routine affairs came 
from the various commit- 
tees. After business cares had 
been laid aside Edward Kelty. 
Chairman of the Entertainment Com- 
mittee, superseded President Kelly, 
and invited all to participate in the 
'•Isanquet luncheon that had been 
provided. Cigars were, of course, 
port of the refreshments, and after 
the.y ho<l been lighted, and while the 
aroma was floating throitgh the hall, 
informal talks on the history of the 
order and Trinity Council were made 
by David O'Connell, Albert F. 
Martin, John J. Sullivan, Sr., Eugene 
Cooney, Andrew Keiffer, President 
James B. Kelly and Supreme, Director 
James T. Shelley, a member of 
Mackin Council, but Trinity's guest 
of honor. 

During the evening the Wavs and 
Means Committee reported that u 
number of contracts for work on the 
superstructure had been let, and that 
the new club house was now assured. 



SATOLLI COUNCIL 



Shows Renewed Int 

Matters Pertaining to 
Y. M. I. 



On Monday evening President WUl 
MclArtwigh called Satolli Council to 
order at 7:25, the meeting being held 
at that hour in order to enable mem- 
bers to attend various social affair' 
later. On hearing the report of the 
nKMintight excursion, Satolli decided 
it would be best not to go in* with the 
Joint. Committee as to the pro[>osed 
other councils on such an enterprise. 
One new application was presented 
and referred to the Investigating 
Committee. 

The matter of the State convention 
was discussed, much regret being 
expressed that the Board of Gram' 

Directors - 1 • 1 have decided apon 

N-< Min'ii as the proper place for 
holding same. Many of the member, 
thought a reconsideration should be 
had and some other point, preferub'v 
Ixmisville selected for the meeting. 
The matter will doubtless be. take.i 
up in the near future. 

Ouite an interesting communicii 
tion from the Grand President was 
read at the meeting. The let l e" 
contained many beautiful sentiment*, 
and showed that the (irand President 
is earnestly endeavoring to awaken 
in each member of the order a better 
appreciation of the real principle* 
upon which the Y. M. 1. organization 
is founded. In selecting the Hon. La 
Vegw Clements for (irand President 
the Y. It I certainly did itself proud, 
and it will be a matter of general 
regret when his term of office ex- 
pires. After a thorough discussion 
of council mattirrs the meeting ad- 
journed. 

RIVAL TEAMS BUSY. 



FRANK FEHR BREWING CO. 



INCO RPOHATED 




Brewers and Bottlers 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 



Cesnb. Phone fUUn 



THE- 



liomo Phone 8913 



Captains Galwny and Rnidy are 
working hard for new members for 
Mackin Council. Last Monday nig'it 
eight, applications were received, 
which shown that both sides are very 
busy. 

DIED IN ST. LOUIS. 

News has been received of the 
death in St. Louis, on last Sunday 
morning, of James Ahearn. formerly 
n carpenter in this city. Mr. Ahem 
left Louisville* some five or six years 
ago. He leaves a widow and two 
children, now living in Missouri. 



CATHOIJC ACADEMY BURNED. 

St. Francis' Academy, a $25,000 
building, at Mason City. Iowa, was 
burned to the ground Friday morn- 
ing of last week. There were 212 
children in the aacdemy when the 
flames were discovered, but all es- 
caped in safety. The insurance on the 
building amounted to $13,000. 

CATHOLIC WOMAN'S CLUB. 

Tuesday afternoon t 3 o'clock a* 
meeting of collectors for the building 
fund of the Catholic Woman's Club 
will be held at the club house on 
Walnut -street. As the time for a 
change of quarters is drawing close, 
it Is earnestly hoped those holding 
books will do all that is possible by 
that time in order that a full report 
may be made. 

CATHOLIC FORESTERS. 

The Caroholic Order of Foresters 
have arranged to have a big meeting 
at liertrantd Hall. Sixth street, be- 
tween Oak ami St. Oathwrine, on the 
evening of Monday. March 16. One 
of the highest officials in the order 
•will deliver the principal address. 
The rest of the programme will be 
in keeping with Catholic taste. St. 
Louis Court is growing, and a dozen 
new applications are in the hands of 
tflie various 



ATHLETIC CU B FESTIVAL. 



The Columbia Athletic Club, a so- 
cial organization composed of many 
of the best known Genman-America.i 
residents of the southeastern part of 
the city, is the first to announce an 
ice cream festival this year. Zeigler's 
Park, ait Shelby and Burnett streets, 
has been secured for the event, which 
will take place on Monday, May 4 
The admission will be only firfteen 
cents and creaim and dancing will be 
free. A feature that will be enjoyed 
•will be, a repetition of the famous 
bratwurst. fest given last year. 

JILTED MAN WINS. 



WIEDEMANN 

BREWING COMPANY'S 

Celebrated Draught and Bottled Beers. 

Sold at all leading bars and cafes. Renowned for purity , strength and excellent flavor 

Gruber & Deuser, Managers, Louisville, Ky. 



DRINK 
Hofbrau and Pilsener Beer 



BREWED BY 



Mrs. Flora Goodman, of Bourne- 
mouth. England, according to the 
highest, court in Great Britain, will 
have to pay Walter L. Phillips, a re- 
tired grocer, $250 for breach of prom- 
ise. He is slaty years old, while 
ahe is fifty-eight. The man claims 
she trifled with bis affections. 



New walking shoes are sometimes 
inclined to "slip" at the heels, and 



SENN tSc ACKERMAN 

BREWING COMPANY. 



TELEPHONE 481. 



FALLS CITY BEER 

ON SALE EVERYWHERE 

NOME PHONE 7669 CUMB. 'HONE WEST 89 



JOHN E. 



WALTERS' 

Clay=Street Brewery, 

812 and 814 CLAY STREET. 
Telephone 209. — , LOUISVILLE, KY. 



JOHNF.OERTELCO. 



INCORPORATED. 



BUTCHERTOWN BREWERY. 

CELEBRATED CREAM BEER, 

1400 to 1408 Story Avenue. 

BOTH PHONES 99a. LOUISVILLE, KY 



CHOICE^ 



Gut Blooms, Plants 

and Designs it RIGHT PRICES 

JACOB SCHULZ, 

THE FLORIST 

644 FOURTH AVENUE 
Both Phones 223. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL 

FOR THE CARE OF IN9ANE AND 
EPILEPTIC PATIENT9. 
The Sisters of Mercy, of Jeffersonville, 
(nd., own and manage a private hospital 
(or the care and treatment of insane and 
tpileptic patients. Both male and female 
patients are admitted. Rates very reas- 
onable. Por further particulars apply 'o 

MOTHER MARY REGIN* 

neRCY HOSPITAL, 
Sparks Avense, • • Jelfersoivllle. lad. 



OPPICB HOURS 
■ TO • 



D0NT YOU WANT 

Good Dental work dona for 
the least money. 

Our Dentistry Will Please Too. 




We are reaponaible and do just aa we 
advertise. All work 



DR. H. J. COUCHMAN, Dentist. 

OFFICE 542 FIFTH STREET. 



Old and Rare Whiskies a Specialty. 




LOUJS WABNITZ & CO., 
Propriitors. 
339 FIFTH STREET. 



a nasty hllster is the result. A simple 
preventive is to rub the inaide of 
the shoes with a little soap art the 
heed before putting them on. 




DENTIST 

739 FOURTH AVENUE 



(Mve yoat btr\t aa edacatloa that will erasers 
them lor life. 

ST. XAVIER'S COLLEGE 

1 1 2 W. Broadway, Louis. Ill*, Ky. 

Conducted by tkeXaverian Brothers. Classical- 
S.-ieotiic and Business Courses. Prehistory I>a> 
partment. Large Bwtmmln. P x>l. *ell Equipped 
! y m n.r)»m Term. Moderate. Bro. J .roes. Ml. 



PMC N. Alii I SONS 




Cirriigt Repairing and Rubter Tlr 

205 AND 207 WEST GREEN 9 



HENRY A, J, POL 

DYER AND CLEANER 

Ladies' and Gents' Wearing Apparel 

WORK 8UARANTEED. 
..is. 528 Fifth Street 



WES. LIQUORS. CI8ARS. 

VAL'S 
SALOO 

val LISTIPt. Prep. 

Hot Lunch every morning from 9 
to H:80 o'clock. 



JKII^IVTXJOKY IRISH AMERICAN, 



BE SURE TO CALL FOR 

McKENNA 

WHISKY 

IT IS ALWAYS PURE. 

H. McKenna, Distiller, Fairfield, Ky. 





Qran W. Smith's Son, 

AL SMITH, Proprietor. 

Funeral Director and Enibalmer 

Carriages Furnished for All Occasions on Short Notice. 

809 W. JEFFERSON STREET. ;: 

TELEPHONE 810. 



D. J. DOUGHERTY 



S. J. McELLIOTT 



DOUGHERTY & McELLIOTT, j 

Funeral Directors and Embalmers. j 



ALL OCCASIONS $ 



All Calls Answsrsd Promptly. Day er Night. 



I 1231 WEST MARKET STREET. I 



HOME PHONE 88 



CUMBERLAND 123 



J. J. BARRETT'S SONS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
AND EMBALMERS. 



lZn^i rvifiiii 



treet. 



U 1 1 l » I l I I I i I i i I I l l I I l l l l l I l I l l l i l I H l i l l l I I l I I II I 1 1 1 



; J. B. TRACY 



L. H. STRAUB ■• 



BOTH PHONES 363. 



TRACY & STRAUB | 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
...AND EMBALMERS.. 

'•'"Z.VrtXV:?'* on 1531 W. MARKET STREET, j 



r»< I I I * I I H I M l-l I I I I I I I 1 I I H I 1 I I Mil M l l t l - l-l - l i l l I I I H i 




THOMAS KEENAN, 
Funeral Directorand Embalmer 

TELEPHONE 365. 

All rail* promptly attended to. day or night. 
Carriages luruiahed {or all occasiona. 

1225 W MARKET ST. 



Independent of All Undertaker*. 

KATIE AGNES SMITH, 
LADY EMBALMER. 

Washiug and Dreaaing Lndiea and 
Children a Specialty. 

Office- P?6 W. St. Catbarina) Bo*h '"v.n« 



C.B.THOMPSON 



ROSEBUDS A SPECIALTY 
FLORAL DESIGNS. 

632 FOURTH AVENUE. 

Both Telephones, IOSO. 

All orders receive prompt attention and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 



Carriages Furnished For All 

J. B. Ratterman 

Successor to Mrs. Geo. Ratterman 

Funeral Director 
and Embalmer 

Home Phone 1180 Cumb. P honeJ I*^. — 

1119 WEST MARKET ST. 




HkNRY fiUNOLD 

BKAI.BR IW 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 

A FIRST-CLASS SAMPLE ROOM 
IN CONNECTION. 

Old Whiskies a Specialty. 

h...pw.u». 540 W. WALWUT. 

HERRMANN BROS. 

IMPORTERS 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Distillers and Wholesale Deal- 
era in Finest Brands ef Ken- 
tucky Whiskies especially 

PEARL OF NELSON 

BOTTLED IN BOND. 
TelepboM INI. U4 Sixlfc Street 



You can "aland pat'* on quttlity and rest at 
lured thnt you are getting your money'a worth 
wheu you u«e our DiaMnoari Wall Planter. It la 
not affected by xero weather if kept from freeing 
two hours. 

Kentucky Wall Plaster Co., 

(INCORPORATED.) 
BOTH PHONES 2267 

Brook and River, - Louisville, Ky. 

Also operating the Hooaier Wall Plaa 
ter Plant, Jeffersonville, Ind. Phone 665 



REASONS 



Wit] sons <»f the Gael <;nth«T 

to C'el«'hrut«> St. Putritk'H 

Dsiy. 




All the new Spring and Summer 
8tylOB and Shapes can be found here 
at reasonable prices. 



CATHOLICS DEVOUT. 



lEiwOi Roman CatiioKe church in 
New York City averages twice as 
many uttewkuita in Sunday service* 
as the individual ahurvhes of any 
other denomination of Christiana. 



Prominent Pavdiienli i.a<i> Paya 
Tribute t<» the Irish 
Apostle. 



Home Phone SM7 



Csmb Main 484 > 



Exiles of Frlii >luk«> Loyal 
American iDlttseni ami 
Pond Friend*. 



IDEAS BEAUTIFULLY EXPRESSED 



In proportion to the size of the 
r-itv, Pndurali linn as many loyal 
Irlsh-Aniprlran sons and daughters 
as arc to be found In Kentucky. Mrs. 
Katie II. Dorian, the estimable wife 
of Col. John .1. Dorian. City Treas- 
urer of I'aducah. pays the following 
tribute to Erin's patron saint: 

The name of St. Patrick Is one of 
the Immortal names of Christianity. 
Almost everybody knows that If was 
this apostle who in the fifth century 
cenverted ancient Ireland from 
pagan worship to the standard cross 
When he landed on Erin's shore he 
found a rare of people deeply im- 
bued with religious zeal — sun wor- 
shippers — an enlightened order of 
ancient paganism. Their rulers and 
Druid priests were men of much 
culture. They debated every point at 
Issue with St. ^Patrick and it seems 
Indeed miraculous that even this 
most remarkable man should have 
lived to witness the conversion of 
that nation to the Christian faith 
without the sacrlfce of a life or the 
shedding of a drop of blood. 

Therefore the name of St. Patrick 
naturally above all else suggests 
thoughts of religion, and his anni- 
versary, which means so much to a 
very Important branch of the human 
family, carries the mind back for 
more than fourteen centuries of the 
most interesting period of the 
world's history. 

Put it Is not the religious or more 
serious phase of this anniversary, 
the observance of which encircles 
the globe, which is to be considered 
here, but the social features of the 
day. 

In dear old Ireland friendly social 
Intercourses is one of the great feat- 
ures of this anniversary; also In 
nearly every important . city of 
Europe, Irishmen and their de- 
scendants will meet in social reunion. 
In far off Australia and New Zea- 
land, of the Southern seas, thou- 
sands of the loyal sons of Saint Pat- 
rick will meet and with love and 
affection pledge their undying loyalty 
to their oppressed motherland. In 
the Western world, in the Dominion 
of Canada, from our Great Lakes to 
the frozen North, true and patriotic 
men will meet in social reunion and 
renew their devotion to the dear 
old land. 

Perhaps nowhere on earth does 
Irish spntlment find such beautiful 
and poetic, expressions as it does on 
St. Patrick's day In this glorious 
Republic of America. The sturdy 
sons of that dear ancient Isle have 
been prominent factors In the up- 
building of this great nation. Their 
sfrong arms have constructed most 
of our immense public Improve- 
ments. Their eloquence, statesman- 
ship and patriotism have Inspired, 
directed and elevated our political 
life at bench and bar, In the State 
Legislatures, in both houses of Con- 
gress, extending even to the White I 
House. Their sons have been among 
our greatest, best and most patriotic 
soldiers, In every struggle from 
Bunker HIM to Sanllago. 

No wonder than that when the 
"Exiles of Erin" meet around the 
banquet board as free and loyal 
American citizens, their celebration 
of this great holiday surpasses in 
grandeur and eloquence all other 
celebrations. 

The thrilling story is told once more, 

The Inspiring song Is heard, • 
And memory to that sacred shore 

Hrlngs back with magic word 
The scene of glorious victory won, 

The hope that can not die. 
That Ireland's flag and golden sun 

Will yet Illumine the sky— 
And symbolize men oppressed. 

Where'er their home may be. 
The help on which their hope may 
rest 

When Ireland shall be free. 



HENRY FUGHS 

FLORIST 

Fun.-ral Designs aid Flowen 
for all occasions. 

GREENHOUSES— Charles and Texas Sts. 
STORE— Hopkins Theatre Building. 



BEAUTIES 



nt County BHgo and llor LakcH 
Described it> Eastern 
JournaJbit. 



A. V. Schmitt, 

THE TAILOR 

S.W. Cor. Shelby & Market 



MIC AM vim ' INSTRUCTION. 



PrlvHte instruction in clorut Ion and 
dramatic ait. In all brain lies. Spi-ciul 
attention given, to Shukrspcurcuii 

character studies. A allele ace given 

li>i:u< - *. societies, etc.. in the presen- 
tation of amateur plays and enter- 
taiiinicnts. Terms reasonable. 

Address, JOSEPH E. HILL. 
UI25 Preston St., Louisville. Ky. 



It U refreshing to know that Louis- 
ville people can get one product that 
is absolutely free from gprms of any 
kind. 

The demand for this company's Ice 
Is increasing every day. because the 
purity of the product advertises 
Itself. 

FEW TOMBS 



Of the Many Popes Ce n Be 
Located By the 
Faithful. 



Only ninety of the 200 and more 
men who have succeeded St. Peter 
as Vicar of Christ on earth have 
marked graves. It is known that 
♦he bones of at least twenty are 
scattered over Italy; some He In 
Florence, others are interred In 
Perugia. Veterbo. Bologna. Naples 
and Milan. The six Avingon Popes 
are burled in France, while one of 
the Popes, who was a native of Ger- 
many, is burled in the Cathedral of 
Romberg. In early Christian days 
the Popes were buried close to the 
tomb of St. Peter In Rome, but from 
the beginning of the third until the 
middle of the fifth century successors 
of St. Peter were In the catacombs. 

The bones of these illustrious 
leaders of the church were usually 
placed In sarcophagi, or Roman 
bathing basins of rare marble, from 
the year 440. A. D.. until the middle 
of the ninth century. For this period 
of 450 years or more the Popes 
who died were placed side by side 
and the several sarcophagi were cov- 
ered by marble slabs. Each of these 
slabs originally contained an epitaph 
setting forth the principal facts In 
the dead man's life. Pilgrims from 
every quarter of the globe visited 
these tombs, and each succeeding 
year helped to wear out the letters 
on the stones, and there are many 
Popes burier" In Rome whose names 
can not even be traced on the burial 
stone. 

During the tenth, eleventh and 
twelfth centuries the Popes w»»re 
buried in the Lateran Rasillca. but 
jelghtytseven of these tombs were 
destroyed In the* sixteenth century 
when the ancient Basilica of St. 
Peter was replaced by the present 
structure. The remaining tombs, not 
now marked, perished in various 
ways and owing to different causes. 



Wooded Isle ( an He Made to 
. Teem With Plent) Bj 

ptllgenee. 



EUrera Are l ew and short in 

Course, Hut MoVC Very 

Rapidly. 



TELLS OF MOUNTAIN AND DALE 



BOSTON CAKE COMPANY, 



SHOWS KNTKHl'I.ISK. 



Plant of American |ce i 
Cold Storage Com- 
pany Enlarged. 



ind 





Prominent among the many cafes 
In Louisville may be mentioned "The 
Roston." located at ^."!7 West Market 
street, where can be found at all 
hours of the day and up to midnight 
one of the best lunches that ever 
tempted the appetite. Of course 
there Is an abundance of fine wines 
and superior liquors on hand all the 
time. The proprietors of The Roston 
have always shown themselves to be 
just In dealing with their patrons, 
and are men of ability. Their con- 
stantly increasing business goes to 
show that their fair dealings have 
told. • Those who desire prompt and 
efficient service would do well to 
patronize this cafe, and thus aid In 
making It a still greater success. .1. 
C. Boardman, who directs (he busi- 
ness, has a host of friends nil over 
this city and State. 



A recent writer In the New Eng- 
land journals gives an admirable 
description of the topogrsphy of 
County Sllgo and her lakes. In part 
he says: 

The surface of County Sllgo 1* 
much varied, having near the sea 
coast extensive plains backed by 
lofty mountains. The interior Is 
hilly, with several lakes interspersed 
with some rivers, which, though not 
of great lengtht or size, add much to 
me beauty of the scenery by theft 
romantic borders and precipitous cur- 
rents. 

There are three lakes In this coun- 
ty remarkable alike for their size and 
beauty. The most northern is Lough 
0111, near the town of Sllgo. on the 
east. It is about nine miles long and 
three broad, studded with islands, 
some of which are richlv wooded, and 
others nresent an expanse of verdant 
meadow. The two largest Islands are 
Innismore (also called Church Island, 
from the remains of an ancient mon- 
astic building, the cemetery of which 
Is still occasionally used as a place 
of interment and Cottage Island, so. 
called from a beautiful lodge erected 
on It. Besides these there are six- 
teen other islands, all more or less 
wooded. 

LoukIi Anow, nearly of the same 
size as the preceding .but more Ir- 
regular In Its outline and equnllv 
beautiful for (ho picturesque varletv 
of its scenery, contains the three 
Islands of Innismore. Innlsbeg nnd 
Annaghgowla. At the most southern 
extremity of the county, and forming 
part of Its boundary on the side of 
Roscommon, is Lough Cara, equally 
picturesque and Irregular and also 
studded with Islands, the chier of 
which are named Derrymore, Inse. 
Inchyniore, nnd Inehyheg, In the Ox 
mountains Is Ix»ugh Calf, or the High 
Lake, surrounded by din's that seem 
to have been thrown up by some ex- 
lake, which Is about a mile long in- 
half a mile In breadth, is well stork, d 
with fish. More northwards in the 
same range of mountains Is Lough 
Easkey. 

The rivers of the county are few, 
and short In their course, but gen- 
erally rapid: that whldi flows from 
Lough GUI is usually called the Sllgo 
river, from Its passing through the 
town, bu( Its proper name is (he 
Garvogue. The wnler of Ballysadarc 
river, also named from a town, but 
properly called the Awenshlen, Is 
formed by the River Arrow, which 
flows from the lake of that name and 
Joins the Owenmore and the Owenbeg 
near the town of Collooney; Un- 
united waters constitute the first 
named river, and. flowing northward 
to Rallysadare, over a succession of 
cascades, form (he greatest horn or 
Inlet of Sllgo bay. 

The River Moy rises In the Ox 
mountains, and tuns nearly south, 
through the barony of Leney, where 
It enters (he Coun(y of Mayo, flowing 
westward through the barony of 
Gallen, and shortly after turning due 
north and Joining (he wa(ers of 
Loughs Conn and Cullen: (hence it 
proceeds by Foxford to Ardmoi", 
where It becomes the boundary be- 
tween Sllgo and Mayo: and pass- 
ing by Ralllna. Rosserlek Abbey, and 
Moyne, to the sen. opens Into the sea- 
clous bay of KUlala. The Easkey 
rises In Lough Easkey, between the 
Ox mountains and KnoekBaree, Had 
flows due north to the sea parallel 
with the Moy. There are' many 
smaller st reams, particularly among 
the mountains, but all tributary to 
those lili-jve mentioned. 



FRANK FEHR BREWING CO. 



AZTEC CAPITAL 



LOSES RIGHT LEG. 



The American Ice and Cold Storage 
Company has made an enormous sue- i 
cess within two years. Its officers 
and stockholders are Irish-Americans. . 
With Charles J. O'Connor as Presl- ; 
dent; John T. Garagbty as Secretary, I 
and Patrick Regan as General Man- 1 
ager, almost any business would pros- 
per. At present the cempany is oper- 
ating fourteen large wagons, and this 
number will have to be Increased dur- 
ing the coming spring and summer. 

The plant at Floyd and Pearl street 
is mammoth in Its proportions, but 
It hag been found necessary to In- 
crease Its capacity. Work is in prog- 
ress right now that will enable the 
company to store 20,000 additional 
blocks of Ice to be used In case of 
emergency. New refrigerating ma- 
chines are also being Installed, and 
when the work is completed the j 
American Ice and Cold Storage Com- 
pany's plant will be second to none 
south of the Ohio river, and will have 
few equals within the boundaries of 
the Pnlted States. The present capac- 
ity of the plant Is 200 tons of Ice 
every twenty-four hours. The prices 
are reasonable and every block of 
lee is made from pure water. 

Every drop of water used In mak- j 
Ing the Ice at the American Ice and 
Cold Storage Company Is distilled be- 
fore It enters the refrigerating tanks 
and Is absolutely pure. In these days 
when adulteration of food products 
has grown so common that the Gov- 
ernment has to enact pure food laws, 



With profound Borrow the many 
friends of Capt. Harry Rundschu 
learned that he had to submit to the 
amputation of his right leg last Sat- 
urday. A little over two months ago 
he was Injured while fighting a fire 
at the Pllcher organ factory. Pieces 
of broken glass penetrated his knee 
and blood poisoning developed. It 
was found Impossible to save the 
limb and the amputation followed. 
For several years be was aide to 
Chief Tyson, and during the Ring- 
ham regime Capt. Bundschu was 
made head of the No. 2 Hook and 
Ladder Company. He Is also an old 
member of Trinity Council. 



Was Home of America's 
Plrst Printing P 
Says History. 



\ Al l i: OF LITTLE THIVMS. 



An excellent and graphic illustra- 
tion of the aggregate value of little 
things Is afforded by*the Bulletin of 
the Anti-Slavery Society of Belguim. 
What Is know as the "Work of Can- 
celled Postage Stamps." established 
sixteen years ago at the Seminary 
of Liege, was able to distribute last 
year among the missionary priests of 
the Congo nearly ten thousand 
francs, beside founding two chapels 
In the Liege diocese Itself. The can- 
celled stamps collected during the 
year reached the rather astonishing 
number of 50,000,000. 

ARCH DIOCESAN SYNOD. 
A synod of the archdiocese of 
Dubuque, Iowa, will be held In that 
city after Easter Matters of con- 
siderable -Interest are to be dls- 
cussed. and Archbishop Keane will 
preside. 



Descendants of the Pilgrim Fathers 
that landed at Plymouth Rock In 
1620 are wont to boast that the first 
printing press In America was In- 
stalled in New England In 1639. and 
that the first book printed on Ameri- 
can soil was the Almanac, owned, 
edited and published by William 
Pierce, a mariner and resident of 
Cambridge. Later the same press 
published a metrical version of the 
Rible, but from the 1908 Dominican 
Year Book we learn a different story. 
The Very Rev. Father V. F. O'Danlel. 
O. P., in a scholarly article, tells of 
his researches and proves that the 
first printing press on what is now 
United States territory was estab- 
lished by one Mr. Glover, at Cam- 
bridge, Mass.. In 1639, and the first 
work published was the "Freeman's 
Oath." The Almanac was the second 
work. Mr. Glover later gave hla 
printing press to the college at Cam- 
bridge, or what Is now Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

But even nefore this printing press 
arrived In New England there were 
other printing presses In Amerlra. As 
early as 1536 there was a printing 
press In the City of Mexico. Father 
O'Danlel writes: "There In the proud 
capital of the great empire of the 
Actors, whose powerful and hnughtv 
sovereigns had for centuries lorded 
It over the surrounding nations, and 
In their bloodv religious sacrifices had 
offered hecntomb upon hectstomb of 
human victims to their Idols, the 
white robed sons of St. Dominic pub- 
lished 'The Srtlrlfiinl Ladder of St. 
John.' In the veor of Our Lord I5SC, 
more than 100 vears before the Pil- 
grims published their first work at 




Brewers and Bottlers 



LOUIS \ II A.K. KV. 



Cumb. Phone Halo 1913 



-THE 



Home Phone 1913 



WIEDEMANN 

BREWING COMPANY'S 

Celebrated Draught and Bottled Beers. 

Sold at all leading Mrs ind cafes. Renowned tor purity, strength and excellent flavor 

Gruber Sl Deuser, Managers, Louisville, Ky. 



DRINK 



Kofbrau and Pilsener Beer 

BREWED BY 

SENN tSc ACKERMAN 

BREWING CO All 'ANY. 



TELEPHONE 452. 



L.OUIHVILLB! KY, 



FALLS CITY BEER 

ON SALE EVERYWHERE 



HOME PHONE 7569 



CUMB. PHONE WEST 



JOHN XL 



FRANK 



WALTERS' 

CIay=5treet Brewery, 



812 and 814 CLAY STREET. 



Telephone 209. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



JOHN F.OERTEL CO, 

INCORPORATED. 

BUTCHERTOWN BREWERY. 

CELEBRATED CREAM BEER, 



1400 to 1408 Story Avenue. 



BOTH PHONES 891. 



LOUISVILLE, KY 



CHOICE 

Gut Blooms, Plants 

and Designs at RIGHT PRICES 

JACOB SCHULZ, 

THE FLORIST 

b44 FOURTH AVENUE 

Hoth Phones 223. 



Office Hours 
9 to 4. 



Pho 

6127. 





PRIVATE HOSPITAL 

FOR THE CARE OF INSANE AND 
EPILEPTIC PATIENTS. 

The Sisters of Mercy, of Jtffersonvillc, 
(nd., own and manage a private hospital 
for the care and treatment of insane and 
epileptic patients. Both male and female 
patients are admitted. Rates very reas- 
onable. For further particulars apply 'o 

MOTHER MARY REGIN.^ 

flERCY HOSPITAL, 
Sparks Avenue. • ■ Jeflerionvllle. lad. 



opficb hoiks 

8 TO 6 



SUNDAYS 
9 TO 12 



DONT YOU WANT 

Good dental work dons for 
ths least money. 

Oar Dentistry Will Please Yen. 




We are responsible snd da just as we 
advertise. All work guaranteed. 

On, H. J. COUCHMAN, Dentist. 

OrriOBMfl FIFTH 8TKKET. 



Old and Rare Whiskies a Specialty. 




LOUIS WABNITZ & CO., 
Proprietors. 
339 FIFTH STREET. 

Cambridge, .Mass. The book was of 
a religious character, while that of 
the Puritans waa only an almanac." 



DENTIST 

73t» FOURTH AVI M E 



Ulvt your bo>« an education that » III prepare 

tbcai lor life. 

ST. XAVIER'S COLLEGE 

113 W. Broadway, LonWvilU, Ky. 

Coudui-ted by Ihr Xivriuu brother*. Claaalcal* 
j .-inn it c and Bunoea* Cour. :». i't?i>aialoiy Ue» 
partmrn*. Largr .swimmin" V ,ot • A'rll Kqutpped 
tvmnat'iiiri Term. Morirratr Hro lamca. l»tr. 




Carriage Repairing and Rubber Tires. 

205 AN0 207 WEST GREEN STREET. 



HENRY I J, PULS, 

DYER AND CLEANER 
Ladies' and Gents' Wearing Apparel 

WORK GUARANTEED. 

528 Fifth Street 



Itm LIQUORS. CI6ARS. 

VAL'S 
SALOON 

VAL LISTER. Pro*. 

Hot Lunch every morning from 

to 12:30 o'clock. 
Utl W. OFtKKCV I 




END OF SEASON SALE 



AT 



THE BIG STORE, 

Is rapidly drawing to a close. You have only a 
few more days to buy at the low prices we quote. 

MEN'S SUITS AND OVERCOATS 
$5.00, $7.7$, $9.75, $12.75, $15.75, $19.75. 



THE BIG STORE, 

MILTON M MARBLESTONE A CO. 



424 Weit Market St. 
Between 
Fosrth and Fifth. 



A Beautiful White Loaf of Bread, 



RESULT OF IB A KINO. 




WATCH FOR TUB PREMIUM TICKETS. 

EDINGER& CO., uib.ndM. g .zi„ e . 




..DURING LENT..! 

. You'll be sacrificing a great many of the pleas- 
ures of life, but there's no need of going with- 
out GOOD COFFEE. Mulloy's TEAS and 
COFFEES are the standard of excellence all 
the year through. 

SPECIAL. GRADE OF COFFEE 

3 LBS. FOR 50C. 

Green, Black or Mixed Teas, an 



excellent grade; 1 pound for 



MULLOY, ^ROASTER. 



' M.m. Phon. i J J i Bl« "W. 



[AHKBT aiTHKKT. 



»»♦ ♦♦♦♦» ♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ ► 



HOME PHONE 1942 



CUMB. SOUTH 628 



THOMAS J. KEANEY, | 

CUT RATE DRUGGIST. 

Prescriptions called for and delivered in anv part of the city without extra 
charges. Patent medicines at cut prices. 

GET A SHAMROCK AND ALSO SEE OUR NEW 
LINE OF POST CARDS FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY. 

SIXTH AND OAK STREETS. 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




"QUICK MEAL" 6AS RANGES. 

For many yeara the "Quick Meal" has 
been universally acknowledged as the 
best gas range in the market. They cook 
quickly, bake excellently and on account 
of their patent air burners consume less 
gas th in any other. They are more 
easily cleaned and are made to last. The 
new improvements this year will keep it 
in the front rank. Hiving made our 
1907 contract before the advance in price* 
of all iron goods we are able to sell at 
old prices. 

GEHER & SON, 

217 MARKET STREET. NEAR SECOND. 



Natural Gas For Cooking 

CONNECTIONS FREE. 

We have enlarged our Gas Works to meet the WINTER demand, and 
we MUST find a market for the gas in the SPRING, SUMMER and FALL. 
We are offering to make a limited number of gas connections without render- 
ing any bill for same until gas has been used for THREE FULL MONTHS. 
We will then credit the cost of gas used against the cost of connections, and 
gpllect only the small balance remaining, if there should be one. 

IF YOUR HOUSE IS ON A STREET REACHED BY OUR PIPES 
OR TELEPHONE FOR DETAILS. 



JTE 



KENTUCKY HEATING COMPANY. 



COK 



AND COAL TAH > W sai.I 



M. J. BANNON, 
Prat, k Mgr. 



ON, JR.. 
Vics-Prai. & Tr«a$ 



H. M. WOLTRING. 
Secretary. 



P. Bannon Sewer Pipe Co. 

Salt Glazed Sewer and Culvert Pipe, 

Bannon't Patent Lidded Pipe for Steam Conduits, 
Wall Copfad, 
Fire Proofing Fine Pipe, F 
Crate and Boili 
Chimney ' 




OFFICE, 1508-812 W. JEFFERSON, 

TBLEPHONB:S73. 

/ORKS— 13 th and 



and Magnolia Ave., Bet. oth 

TSLBPHOHB 3833. 



HIBERNIANS. 

What They Have Been Doing 
the Past W 



Last night Division 2 held a good 
meeting. 

Division 1 will meet in regular 
session next Friday night. 

Important business was transacted 
by Division 3 Thuisday night. 

Limerick Is expected to turn out 
iu great shape for Division 4's meet- 
ing Monday night. 

Every division in Louisville is 
working In the Interest of its section 
of th3 Marching Club. 

In Wfonsorket. R. L, t/he members 
are considering the advisability of 
purchasing a permanent home. 

County Chaplain Father McNamee 
and several of the State officers at- 
tended the union meeting at Sedalia, 
Mo., last week. 

The new Hibernian Rifles are 
causing great enthusiasm, and the 
chances are that the company will be 
swelled to 100. 

A class of thirty candidates re- 
ceived the first and second degrees 
from Division 7, of Syracuse, N. Y., 
Thursday night. 

Denver Hibernians are preparing 
for a grand street parade after hear- 
ing mass at Sacred Heart church on 
St. Patrick's day. 

ltnltimore members have begun a 
ca-mpnign to raise $50,000 for a new 
Jmilding. The order In tihait city num- 
bers 2.000 members. 

In Manchester. N. H., a town much 
smaller than Louisville, the four di- 
visions will attend the Catholle or- 
phans' concert In a body. 

At Yonkers, N. Y.. seven divisions 
of the order and three branches of 
the Ladies' Auxiliary will approacn 
holy communion Sunday. March 15. 

Illusions 10 nnd 20. of the Ladies' 
Auxiliary, Providence. R. I., have 
b eg an arrangements for a joint so- 
clal to be held immediately after 
Easter. . 

Wearing flielr badges and white 
gloves four divisions of the order in 
Manchester, N. H., will march to the 
Cathedral next Sunday to attend the 
high mass. 

Division 4 put through •thirty-two 
of the thirtyt-six candidates initiated 
at the joirtt "meeting lant week. Since 
t'hen fifteen new applications have 
been presented to the proper officials 
of that division. 

Syracuse Hibernians celebrated 
the anniversary of Robert Emmet 
this week under the auspices of the 
Onondaga County Board, and the 
proceeds were turned over to the 
House of Providence. 

The approaching celebrations of 
St. Patrick's Day, religiously and so- 
cially, will be monumental successes. 
The fact that the Ladies' Auxiliary 
Is to unite with the men has put the 
members on their mettle. 

Manchester, N. H., lias more than 
1,000 members In its four division.^, 
and they are now considering the 
erection of a Hibernian Hall that can 
be used for joint Initiations and as 
a club house by its members. 

The members of the order In Mil- 
waukee will inarch In a body to St. 
John's Cathedral on the morning of 
St. Patrick's day, where they will re- 
ceive holy communion. In the even- 
ing they will assemble at the Pabst 
Theater, where nddrosses will be 
made by men of national repute, rec- 
itations delivered and Irish balladB 
sung. 



NEW HELLS. 



Tower at St. Anthony's to 
Receive an Additional 
Adornment. 



The bells that are to swing in the 
tower of St. Anthony's church, 
Twenty-third and Market streets, 
have arrived in New York, nnd will 
lie forwnrded to Louisville during 
the coming wiiek. They will be 
blessed and hung in the belfry before 
Lent is over, but will not be sounded 
before Easter Sunday morning. 

Bells in Cnflholic churches are 
blessed with great solemnity. They 
toll slowly, sorrowfully for the dean. 
They ring regularly and steadily in 
call the faithful to mass on Sundays 
and holy days <of obligation. Three 
times e'aoh day they sound tli« 
Angelus. At weddings, on feasts like 
Kant»ir, CiirfMnias, tihe Assumption, 
they ring out in joyous tones. In 
every ape and land t'he hells have 
been told of in prose and poetry. The 
very word hell carries with it a 
vibrating thrill, and one can n.it 
wonder why Father Francis Mahonv 
was moved to write: 
"With deep nffecition and recollection 

1 often think of those Shnndon 
'bells, 

Whose music wild, would in days of 
ohikMiood, 
Fling 'round my cradle their magic 
sjiells." 

The new bells, of St. Anthony's 
church were made to order accord- 
ing to specifications, and are expect- 
ed to be t'he best ever heard in this 
city. 

CALLED HOME. 



Veteran Catholic Merchant 
Mas Gone to Mis Eter- 
nal Reward. 



22a 



Charles A. lingers, one of Louis- 
ville's oldest merchants, one of it« 
most devout QatUioHca, fine o' its 
moat affectionate men, one who 
scorned to take a business advantage 
of apotheT, died *t St. Joseph's In- 
firmary Monday morning. Grip, and 
laler pneumonia, -proved too much 
for bis advanced vears. His funeraj 
took place from St Louis 1 .1: rand's 
oKiirdh Wednesday morning. At the 
time of his death he was connected 
wit* the Ctiarlea A- Rogers Book 
Company, 434 West Jefferson street. 

Mr. Ropers was the descendant of 
an old IrHh Csvtholic family of Bait i- 
more. Almost 100 years «gw his 
father oame from Maryland to Ken- 
tucky to draw plans for the Cathe- 
dral at Bards town. Arehiteota were 
almost an unknown quality in Ken- 
tucky then, and the young architect 
found lot* of work. It was while 



Uha family was living at Bardstown, 
more than seventy-five years ago, 

that. Charles A. Ropers was born. The 
father ialer removed his family to 
Louisville and for years -was engaged 
in business as an architect. It was 
he who drew the plans for the pres- 
ent Cathedral. 

His son, Charles A. Rogers, at an 
early ape, bepan business for himself 
as a dealer in Catholic books anil re- 
ligious articles. He was for years 
on Jefferson street near Second, 
later on Second fctretft, and again at 
Third and Jefferson. Still later he 
removed to 4:14 We-st Jefferson. For 
years lie had practically no com- 
petitors in his line. He wns b"1ovcd 
by clergy and laity. Always kindly, 
yet sedate, he had a Cheering word 
for all. The deceased never married, 
but lavished his affections on nieces, 
neiphews nnd their children. Two 
nieces. Mrs. Peter J. Bowling, of this 
city, and Miss Emma Hurley, survive 
him. After death his <hody wns re- 
moved to the home of his grand- 
nephew. Herman O'Brecht. 327 East 
Breckenridpe street, where it reposed 
until time for the requiem mass 
Wednesday morning. 

AMI MM I NTS. 



Louis James and his excellent mm- 
]Kinv will present "The Merry Wives 
of Windsor" at Maenule.v's Theater 
during the latter half of next week. 

"The Man of The Hour." which 
made such a great hit here several 
weeks ago. will return to Mneaulcy's 
for the first half of next week. The 
drama deals wtth |x>litic*l bosslsm. 

Manager E- W. Dustin promises an- 
other good bill for Hopkins Theater 
nexlt week. All of his moving pic- 
ture shows have been clean and pure. 
He HKipect.s to have something of a 
religtou.s nature durinp Lent. The 
Crawford Film Company's pictures 
are far above the average, and every 
programme is carefully arranged. 

Frank Jones nnd Hilda Carle in the 
ttaekal comedy. "A Lucky Dog," with 
the Bed Raven Cadets and a strut' ir 
supporting company, will open Mon- 
day at the Masonic for a week's en- 
gagement. The music is catchy an 1 
a number of new novelty crentioiis 
lire presented with costuim." and ligiit 
effects calculated to dazzle and de- 
light even the most blase theater- 
goers. 

Manv people like to he mystified, 
even when tiny know they are hum- 
bugged. They like fents of legerde- 
main and the slight -of -hand per- 
formances of the prestidigitateur. 
Those who like that kind of thing 
will undoubtedly enjoy Prof, 
/.artoon's exhibition at Liederkrau/. 
Hall next week. His press agent 
savs: 

"Prof. Zantoon is touring this part 
of the country giving exhibition's of 
his wonderful' skill in legerdemain. 
He has met with success everywhere 
he has appear. id. and has never failed 
to please the large audiences that 
greeted him everywhere. He has a 
faculty for telling people things 
alioiit'thoinseilves that they had for- 
gotten. He does not try to explain 
his powers; he merely gives nn exhi- 
bition and get results. 

"His performances include the mys- 
terious cabinet, from which appear 
.spirit hands and facas. the ringing 
of bells and playing of musical in 
struments; although he Is within nnd 
securely bound. He has the ep- 
l chnnU>d (lw»ttle from which any and 
nil the delicious drinks are poured 
to meet the requests of his nudienc '. 
He rends messages from the names 
of the dead and the living, and tells 
much of what is in the mmds of th ■ 
writers. He locates lost articles, 
jewelry, papers and coins. He has a 
repertoire of hundreds of these mar- 
velous feats. All his work is done 
in the full glare of day or the brig it 
electric light. There arc no dark 
Msnces on his programme. 

"His success is not alone due to his 
profieiencv in handling the mys- 
terious. Prof. Zartoon is an affable 
and entertaining gentleman In 
private as well as on the stage, and 
it. is a plnasure to be in his company 
wherever it may lie. His entertain- 
ments are of refined character and 
specially to please the ladies. An 
opportunity to witmes these wonder- 
ful manifestations of bewildering 
mystification will soon lie offered the 
people and it will certainly be the 
part of wisdom <o improve the 
chance, as Prof. Zartoon may not 
pass this wnv again soon, nnd it will 
be a verv long lime before his equal 
is found." 

WELL WON TRIBUTE. 



Dr. C. F. Miedrton, editor of the 
Kentucky Red Man, a long time res- 
ident of Limerick, one who knew 
how to appreciate diamonds in the 
rough, had this to say of his old 
friend, neighbor and fellow Red 
Man: "I have Just learned that Rich- 
ard <)uiun is dead. Wh-n I started 
out to get up a charter list for Sioux 
Tribe, 'Rick • Qui nil's name was one 
of the first secured. He was th<5 
first Keeper of Wampum, conse- 
quently a I'nst Sachem. While he 
wiis not, strictly speaking, a good 
attending iivmiber, yet he wns a 
good one in many other respects, and 
di<l veoman servloe in laying the 
foundation of Sioux Tribe. Whatever 
the tribe undertook he helped to 
uuike a success, ami s|>cnt his wam- 
pum freely to* do this. In his large 
body he carried an equally large 
heart which prompted him to i> 
deeds of charity and kindness that 
were not blazoned to the world. He 
was reticent in regard to this and 
dhl not like to hear others speak of 
it. Ifci was ready at any and all 
times to go to the assistance of those 
who called upon him, and he not 
infrequently met with ingratitude 111 
return. But aside from an occasional 
comment he pursued the even tenor 
of his way and was rvady to try 
ngain. \Vith such a nature it often 
happens one. is his own worst enemy, 
and so it was with 'Rick-' In the 
silent home that now holds him is 
Feet, quiet rest. In the ethereal 
happy hunting grounds w e hope the 
Great Spirit has taken the immortal 
part of 'Rick' Quinn. Charity, we 
are told, covers a multitude of sins." 



JEWISH HOSPITAL CONCERT. 



The concert given at the Coliseum 
for the benefit at the Jewish Hos- 
pital was quite a financial as well 
as a musical success. Over 7,000 tick- 
ets were sold, and only standing 
room could be had by the time the 
opening number was played. It is 
understood thalt the debt on the 
hospital was cleared off and a nice 
balance left in the treasury- A num- 
ber at valuable, prizes were dis- 
tributed, and the distribution was so 
quickly and systematically made as 
to excite the admiration of men 
familiar with such work. 



IRELAND. 

Record of the Host Important of 
the Recent Events Culled 



The town of Shcrcock has installed 
an acetylene system for lighting its 
streets. 

The plowing season in the North U 
far advanced and the weather is sea- 
sonable. 

This year more farmers than for- 
merly are rnisuig wheat, and the 
prospM-t for ;i big yield is jjood. 

Thomas McCeough has been tried 
for lunacy and committed to the 
Bnsaiice. asylum ini County Monnghaii. 

Tenants, who believe they have u 
legal right to their llx>gs. threaten 
to duck surveyors or others who dis- 
pute their rights. 

Rev. Father P. J. Mulkern, of 
Loughrea, County Galway, has gone 
to .New York to raise funds for St. 
Brendan's Cathedral. 

Martin Leahy, a newspaper com- 
positor nnd a lubor m> mber of Lim- 
erick Corporation, litis been appoint- 
ed Magistrate in that city. 

Peter Coogan, an old and respected 
memlier of the parish of Clontibret, 
died at his home near Cornamuckli, 
and was buried in Ballintra. 

A plowing mutch was held on the 
farm of Miss Callan, Seatown, re- 
cently, and the neighboring farmers 
made great sport of hard work. 

The Capuchin friars conducted a 
mission ;it Ardee recently, and -for 
two weeks every service was well 
attended (with morning and evening. 

Curdinnl Logue is get it tig ready to 
depart for America, where he is t > 
preside over the centenary sol- 
enmities of the diocese of New York. 

The Right R. v. Bishop O Callaghan, 
of Cork, was recently the guest of 
the Irish Dominichms of the church 
of St. Clement during his visit to 
Rome- 
James O'Neill, for many years a 
memlier of the Koval Irish Con- 
stabulary, died suddenly at his home 
in Dundulk. He was seventy-five 

Men old. 

Mrs. Ellen Ihinne died at Cnrrick- 
011-Shannoni a few days ago ut the 
age of 110. She served as a nurse 
during the Crimean war, and was 
three times a widow. 

Sir Robert Anderson, Lord Mayor 
of Belfast, his wife ami sister-in-law, 
recently paid a visit to County Mon- 
aglio.ii, where Sir Robert has < pur- 
chased a country seat. 

Miss . Anna Knowison, of Ciren- 
cester, and Miss Bridget Donnelly, of 
Cooley, County Louth, have taken 
their first vows as Sisters of Charity 
in the mother house at Hereford^ 

C. J. Dolan, the Sinn Fein candidate 
for Parliament for North Leitrim, 
was defeat ed by Michael Mi" ban. the 
regular Irish 'Parliamentary party 
candidate, by a vote of 3,101 to l.lT'.i. 

John Humphreys, of Drumbrah, 
was awarded (lie champion's sil-'er 
Map in the recent plowing match in 
County (avail. All the plows that 
won prizes were of Irish manu- 
facture. 

The Right Rev. Bishop McCormack, 
of Oulwuy. sent $2."> to the Irish Par- 
liamentary fund, and with it sent 
these words of good cheer: "Our 
Parliamentary plialan\ having b en 
united, there is a chorus of joy from 
end to end of the country." 

At Boyle, County Roscommon, 
neary every able bnlied mini was 
pissed under arrest by a detail of 
more than 100 policemen. The men, 
who were churged with intimidating 
a post-office official, were taken 
from their beds at 4 o'clock in the 
morning. Only six were held to an- 
swer to the approaching ussizes. 

MADE MONET. 



Central Committee's Bent 
fit formed Nucleus Tor 
Big fund. 



The Entertainment Committee of 
Hm Central Committee of the C. K. 
of A. was txith surprised and delight- 
ed by the magnificent turnout of 
their friends ;it the "benefit" at Hop- 
kins Theater last Monday. From 
noon until nearly 10 o'clock the peo- 
ple came to the theater- Louisville, 
South Louisville, IVirtluud, Parkland, 
Limerick, the Highlands, Crescent 
Hill, Clifton, Pewee Valley, New Al- 
bany, Jeffersonyille, all were repre- 
sented. 

Munager E. W. Dustin gave them a 
good show, too. Each picture was 
wisely selected nnd excellently por- 
trayed. At no time was there a 
hitch. The musie was appropriate, 
and those who uttended .the enter- 
tainment were, well satisfied with 
what they saw 11 ml heard. 

As a result of the entertainment 
the Central Committee has n nucleus 
for a fund that will nid its members 
in entertaining its guests when the 
State convention is held here next 
fall. 



TIME TO REJOICE. 



Sliver Anniversaries For 
Many Priests During 
This Month. 



Quite a number of German-Ameri- 
can priests are to celebrate their 
silver jubilees during the present 
month. Today Rev. Father Joseph J* 
Haar, poster of St. Joseph's church, 
Martinsburg, Mo., celebrated the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of his or- 
dination, ami today, also. Rev. Father 
Anton Franz Die pen/brock celebrated 
his silver jubilee. 

Tuesday the Rev. Father Joseph 
Fischer wtill celebrate his anniversary 
after twenty-five years as a Levitt, 
at East Buffalo, and on Thursday 
Father Basil Oderntvtt, O. S. B.. wiil 
celebrate at the Benedictine Abbey. 
Conception, Mo. 

Father Joseph Soentgerath. D. D-. 
will celebrate his silver jubilee at St. 
Joseph's College, Columbus, Ohio, 
Mnreh 24, and a day later Father 
Carl Vincent Stetter, D. D., rector of 
St. Joseph's church, Kent land, In J., 
will celebrate. 

Each of theae willing workers In 
the vineyard of the Lord were born 
in Germany, but all received th- 
greater part of thel reducation in 
America. 



! JAMES GREENE! 

425, 427 AND 429 EAST MARKET STREET. 

Furniture, 
Carpets, Rugs, 
Stoves, Ranges 

LOWEST PRICES 
BEST TERMS 

That offer an opportunity to save 
aJlUVtS money and prepare for cold weather. 

Peninsular Smoke Consuming Direct Draft Heater 

Bums any kind of fuel; keeps fire all winter. Its one of the most 7A 
satisfactory and scientifically constructed heaters on market. Price i>«" 

THE OAK HOT BLAST 

Burns any kind of fuel, has large fire bowl. 13 inches in diam- (7 »A 
eter Large double fuel doors. Air tight ash pit. OUR PRICE J> I ,0\) 

PROGRESS OAK 

Large firm bowl, nickel foot rails, urn and keys and fl"C f*\ <C0 CA 
wood or coal; large fuel doors. Prices v*5 10 ^)Cr«0U 



top ring: burns 




$16 Per 100 Bushels. 

We have the most centrally located yards in the city, the best coal, tha best 
teams, the best drivers and can guarantee the most satisfaciory deliveries — 
what more could you ask? 

SCANLON COAL CO., 

Incorporated. 



laSAAAAAAAA ▲ ▲ d 



►♦♦♦♦♦»»»»♦»♦ 



LARGEST and BEST 

EN THE CITY. 

UNITED LAUNDRY CO.f 



INCOKPOKATRD 



HAND WORK A SPECIALTY.^^> 

Q00DS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

BOTH PHONES 1I88-493-732 

MAIN OFFICE— 504 SIXTH, NEAR GREEN. 



Shorthand and Typewriting 



btablishtd Reliable System. 




as taught at this institution is a valuable 
acquisition to any person. A stepping stone 
to success. Secures the bp*t employment. 
Spencerian graduates are always in demand 



COMMERCIAL SCHOOL, 

TOKATED, Cain National Bank Bids. 

to5lVvUlI S ' T K , I 




The cnas. ft. Rogers book go. 

PRAYER BOOKS AND ROSARIES 

TO SUIT EVERY TASTE 

Give us a cal and inspect our line of goods. They are the 
finest of their kind in the city. 

BOOKS, MAGAZINES AND RELIGIOUS ARTICLES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

W r - Jefferson Street. 



FALLS CITY MEAT MARKET 

353 SECOND STREET. I. F. SULLIVAN, Manager. 

HBAIiyi AK I KIitS l "< > IV 

Dressed Poultry and Game of All Kinds in Season 

You can alwaya find the beat the market affords in Choice Cuba of Beef, Spring 
Lamb, Pork and Cured Meats of all kinds. Also the Beat and Pulest Lard in the 
city. We also carry Early Fruits and Vegetables and all firat-clasa market products 



1 carry Early Fruits and Vegetables 
L0UISTILLE PACKING C0MPAMT S MEATS ONLY. 




Both Phons. 2399 



DR. J. T. CHAWK, 

Veterinary Infirmary and 
Horse Shoeing Forge. 

SCIENTIFIC AND PRACTICAL HORSE SHOEING 

Horses Called Por and Delivered. 
OFF U F .Ol F0RQE, 91 WIS SEVENTH ST. 



*>♦♦♦><♦♦♦♦♦>>♦♦>♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦!>♦» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



- rim win E8. 



345 West Green Street. 

- LIQUOR*. 




THE BIG STORE, 

ADVANCE SPRING STYLES. 

HIGH CLASS MEN'S SPRING SUITS 

$7.80, $10, $12, $15, $20, $25. 
KEN'S SPRING STYLE HATS 
9*c, $1.48, $1.98, $2 AS, $:*. 



THE BIG STORE, 



424 Weit Market St. 
Between 
Foarth and Filth, 



M I L 



TON M MARBLESTONE A CO. 



BOCK BEER 

OUT TODAY 



8 
H 

a 
B 



; - A'a\' A-AA A A. A. a\Aa\AAAAAa\AAA/i 

FOR YOUR SPRING NEEDS WE CALL TO YOU 



HUBBUCH BROS. For Rugs. 
HUBBUCH BROS. For Carpets. 
HUBBUCli BROS. For Wall Paper. 

An acquaintance with us in these 
lines will be of mutual good. 

Prices, Quality, Selection and Good Service 

Make trading here always satisfactory. 
Yours for an early call. 

HUBBUCH BROS. 

524*26-28 W. MARKET STREET. 



[ 



aimmrnmmmmmmmimn mmtmnmmmmmmmniK 
1 PROTECTION! 1 

HE AT THE LOWEST POSSIBLE COST. 



Ithe /ETNA LIFE 



=3 
=3 



insurance 

COMPANY 

OF HARTFORD, CONN. 



OVER 57 YEARS OLD. 




■fas » Rcctmt unxurjMW.ee! fur prompt payment ilnim. nml fair 
ilraliuRU willi its policy holder*. 



3 

0U1 NEW CONVBRTIBLF. POLICY RATES: ^ 

A.;. Annual Premium 3 

SO $10.'i:< =s 

35 12.11 S3 

40 ........ 13.67 ^ 

45 . Hi.SU 3 

50 22 An 23 

60 43.73 23 



Annual Premium 

$ !» 22 

!l.43 

9.53 

9.71 

9.86 

10.01 



E= 



WHY HRSlTATfi Whaa ««m caa get weta icllablt Boancial protection *n 

your fnmilv nt -', «m.ill i i<— I ' The Aetna 1.41c >.f llaniuril, Conn , i» n- -■■<<<. 
and sound a* the natloa'a credit. 

LOREN B. WILLIAMSON, Mgr. Ky. State Agency. 

= SECOND FLOOR TODD BLOG. FOURTH AND MARKET STREETS. 

..DURING LENT.. 

You'll be sacrificing a great many of the pleas- 
ures of life, but there's ii" need of lining with- 
out GOOD CO K FEE. Mulloy's TEAS and 
id. ml of excellence all 




COPPBB8 are the sti 
the year through. 

SPECIAL ORADB OF COI 



D D 

50C. 

(ireen, Black or Mixed Teas, an ACL-. 
excellent grade; 1 pound for x 

COFFEE 
ROASTER. 



3 LBS. FOR 



MULLOY, 




George J. and John M. Christ, Frank Fehr Brewing Co., 

Phoenix Brewing Co., Paul Reising Brewing Co., 

Schaefer-Meyer Brewing Co., Senn & Ackerman Brewing Co., 

George Wiedemann Brewing Co., 



Public Amazed! Crowdsl Pleased Crowds! 

ATTKNIMNK 1 

JAMES GREENE'S 

Manufacturers' Outlet Sale. 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, RUGS, ETC. 

The big crowds that are attending James Greene's 
Manufacturers Outlet Sale since the opening day 
of the sale has been something enormous. The 
people are snapping up the many grand bargains 
that are on sale. Vast crowds of eager buyers 
that are purchasing the entire stock rapidly. The 
sale will continue and last only 7 days longer. 
The prices on every piece of Furniture, every 
Rug, every yard of Carpet in the r.tore have been 
cut down to the very lowest in order to make quick 
selling of the entire stock. Those who need Fur- 
niture or Carpets will benefit greatly by this, the 
most stupendous sale of House Furnishings that 
was ever given on any stock of Furniture in any 
part of the United States. You ..an not afford to 
miss it — don't delay — hurry, in and secure your 
share of the many grand Furniture values being 
offered at JAMBS GREENE'S MANUFACTUR- 
ERS' OUTLET SALE now in progress. The stock 
consists of Furniture of every description, Carpets, 
Rugs and Household f>#ods, now being sold rap- 
idly at a fraction of their real value. Be careful 
and be sure you find the rjght place. 

Look for the big sign at 425-27-29 East Mar- 
ket St. This is a furniture sale where your 
dollars does double dutv. 



NEGATIVE VICTORY. 



H.O, I'll m i i j i 

joooooooooc. 



U14 VV. MAHKKT MTRBBT. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



HOME PHONE 1942 



CUMB. SOUTH 628 



THOMAS J. KEANEY, 

CUT RATE DRUGGIST. 

Prescriptions called fat and delivered in any part of the city without extra 
* charges. Patent medicines at cut prices. 

GET A SHAMROCK AND ALSO SEE OUR NEW 
LINE OF POST CARDS FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY. 

SIXTH AND OA K STREETS. 



JOS. SIBLER S SON j 

...CONTRACTORS... 



HOME PHONE 2354. CUM8. WEST 354. 

! S. W. Corner 26th and Green Sts. 



Judges in Mackln Debate 
Unanimous In Their 
Decision. 

Government ownership of rail- 
roads was the topic discussed by 
Mackln Council'* Debating Club last 
Sunday afternoon. Sherley O'tiniff 
and Thomas Hachman espoused the 
cause of the affirmative and were 
armed with statistics to show that 
the I'nited States ouf?ht to own its 
railroads. They took up the doctrine 
laid down by William Jennings 
Pryan two years ago, and argued 
that he was correct. 

The negative of the proposition 
was defended by John T. Kenney and 
Frank Morgan. The two latter con 
tended that government ownership 
would only place additional power in 
the hands of crafty, and sometimes 
dishonest politicians; that it would 
create more Federal Jobs and In- 
crease Federal bosslsm. They also 
asserted that government ownership 
of the railroads would be a bad busi- 
ness policy. The speakers for the 
affirmative side occupied forty-five 
minutes In presenting their cause, 
while . the negative contenders 
finished In ten minutes. The Judges 
of the debate were Samuel J. Rob- 
ertson, Leo Fischer and George 
Slmonls. They gave a unanimous 
deetttoa In favor of the negative con- 
tention. A large crowd applauded 
telling points made by the various 
speakers. 



on St. 1 'at rick's day. 
want these green earnat 
oilier green plants or 
appn tpriat e decora lions 
in their orders at once 
Million, one of the most 
signers in Louisville, will mo that 
you x-et what .noii want in honor of 
Erin's patron sairat. 



who 

ons or any 
lowers, for 
hould send 
Miss Lixsle 

'irtistic de- 



COCA-COLA 



RECENT DEATHS. 



Mr. and Mrs. L. I). Hax have the 
isyiii|Kitliy of many friend- ou r the 
loss of lheir infant son, John 
Francis, wtio died at the family res- 
idence, 719 East Chestnut street, last 
Sunday. The little one was nine 
in.. ill lis old and had been ill several 
weeks. 



One of the Most Refresh 
log Beverages of P 
ent Age. 



PURAK 

Phone 1281 and try a case of Purak 
Distilled Water 10 1-2 Gal. Bottles 

50c. DELIVERED. 

Merchants Ice & Cold Storage Co. 

618 SEVENTH STREET. 

PURAK 



won ntisn BRIDE. 




4. J. BANN0N, 
Pra». & Mgr. 



P. BANN0N. JR.. 
Vlca Prai. & Traai. 



{Kentucky Vitrified 



INCORPORAT 
M(ii KiKaotu 



IVITRIFIED PAVING 

FOR STREETS AND ROADWAYS, 

| Office, 508-512 W. Jefferson St. Works, Magnolia A» 

TELEPHONE 573. TELEPH 

Ii 




A recent article, now going the 
rounds in the dally papers, tells an 
meedote of Marquis Linlithgow, of 
Scotland. The Marquis says he went 
to Ireland when quite a young man 
to Inspect the horseflesh he had 
heard so much about. When he 
reached Dublin a well known horse 
dealer of that city told him he should 
look for a wife In Ireland Instead of 
a horse. The Scotch peer did as he 
was advised. He married the daugh- 
ter of Lord Ventry. an Irish peer. 
He closed his story by advising all 
Scotchmen to follow his example. 

MIGHT RE HUB. 

A man who died at the Salvation 
Army Hospital in Kansas City last 
week gave the name of Herbert 
Oomican. and said when admitted 
that he had a brother who was an 
Irish peer. H Is now believed that 
his right name was Francis Patrick 
Clements, and that he was the only 
brother and heir of the present Earl 
of Leitrlm. He was starving when 
admitted to the hospital. His photo- 
graph will be sent to Ireland for 
Identification. 



Louis Hoes, a well known resident 
of Clifton, who died at his home. 
1557 State street, Saturday, was 
burled from the Church of St. 
Fiances of Home Monday morning. 
The deceased was sixty-nine years 
old. and spent the greater part of 
his life In Louisville. 



The funeral of Mrs. Katherlne 
Smith, of New Albany, who died at 
her home, 715 Locust street, last 
Saturday, took place from Holy Trin- 
ity church on Monday. Her hus- 
band, Robert D. Smith, and several 
children survive her. The deceased 
was forty-four years old, and her 
death Is mourned by many. 

Olivpr Galvin, 1he fourteen-year-ohl 
son of Dr. nnd Mrs. R. E- Galvin, and 
one the brightest boys in the 
Sophomore class of the High School, 
died Monday morning after a week'.< 
illn ss. Mis death resulted from in- 
testinal trouble. His parenfU and 
one sister. Miss Myra. survive an.T 
have the sympathy of the entire com- 
iittmity in their bereavement. The 
funeral took place from St. Patrick V 
chur«"h Wednesday morning. 



PJie fun>ral of Miss 
respected young- lady 



PRESS AND CATHOLICS. 

Many people are not aware that 
a Catholic invented the first printing 
press and that all of the leading 
cities In Europe had printing presses 
before Martin Luther was born. 



GREEN CARNATIONS. 



Henry Fuchs, <he jropular Hopkins 
Theater florist, has arranged to 
furnish bis patrons and friend* with 
all t/he gTeen carnations they need ' 



Mamie Fay. r. 
speeli'4l young la<l.\ "f the \Ve«l 
End. took place from St. Patrick's 
dhmrctl Monday morning. She was 
the daugHuter of Mrs. Mary Fay. «v" 
islis West Market street, and a sisler 
of John Fay, the well known owner 
of race horses. Miss Fay had been 
an invalid several years and her 
death on SatunUiv was no<t unex- 
p-H'ted. She bore her lonir suffering 
putiently. and died a faithful Chris- 
tian girl. 

COMMITTEE'S AWARD. 

Representative Cooper, of Wiscon- 
sin. Chairman of the Committee on 
Insular Affairs, has made 'an elab- 
orate teport on the bill for the pay- 
ment of the claims of the Catholic 
church in the Philippine IslandB. 
After' many bearings the committee 
has recommended an allowance of 
$403,030 19. *No allowance has 
been made for Interest on the long 
standing claim. 



Occupying a prominent position 
KIBO.Bg the leading business establish 
merits of Louisville and the South is 
the Coca-Cola Hottllng Works, lo 
cated at 1008-1010 We3t Main street 
Coca-Cola, "the most refreshing 
drink In the world," is a beverage 
scientifically prepared. It contains 
the beneficial elements of the cocoa 
leaf and the cola nuts, combined with 
pure sugar, pleasant aromatlcs and 
absolutely pure water highly charged 
with carbonic gas. It Is delicious 
sparkling and refreshing. The manu 
facturers spare no expense In the 
preparation of Coca-Cola, and every 
bottle is guaranteed to contain abso- 
lutely pure Ingredients. 

The old adage that imitation is 
the slncerest flattery Is exemplified by 
the many imitations of this refresh- 
ing drink now on the market. If you 
call for Coca-Cola It Is because you 
are convinced that it Is what you 
want; therefore do not let an tin- 
scrupulous dealer palm some Inferior 
article r,n you for the real stuff. 

Bottled Coca-Cola Is supplied to 
the trade In cases containing from 
two to six dozen bottles, and retails 
for five cents a bottle. Families are 
supplied through merchant! and from 
the local bottling plant nt SI per 
case of two doyen bottles. Fred S 
Schmidt Is one of Ixiulsvjlle's great 
business hustlers, and under his ablr» 
management the saie of Coca-Cola la 
flourishing In this city. 



ANNE BOLEYN'g CLOCK. 



IN PAR EAST. 



The Japan Weelky Mail says that 
the Catholic paper, the Koe. Is the 
only religious paper In Japan which 
combats the attacks made on Chris- 
tianity by Buddhist and Shlntolst 
writers. 



GRAND COI' NCI 1< IX Al tit ST. 

The Grand Council. Kentucky juris- 
diotlon, Y. M. I*. will meet in Louis- 
rille August. 9, 10 and 11. All of the 
locul councils axe preparing' to re- 
ceive ojid entertain thedr Visitors in 
true Kentucky stylo. 



In the corridor of Windsor Castle 
is a el«K-k which is said to have bean 
presented to Anne Koleyn on her 
wtMMitijr morniii(g by Henry VII. 1 1 
is rather over four inches wpiare 
and ten inches High, Hunuouuted by 
a figure of a lion. It was purchased 
on helm If of Queeu Victoria for 11*1 
pounds five shillings when Horace 
WaliwWs collection ait Strawberry 
Hill wtas sold, and was then de 
scribed as "a ekx-k of silver gilt, 
richly cha.sed. engraved and orna- 
mented with 'fleur de-lya,' little 
ImnuIs, etc. On "he tmp sits a llo't 
holding the arms of Fnglnnd, which 
are also on the sides." The weights 
are of lead, cased In copper, gilt and 
enigrttved: on one arc the initial le'- 
ters of Henry and Anne and <rue 
lovers' knots;' on the other "H. A.*' 
alone; at the top of each is "Dieu et 
mon droit;" at Mie bottom, "the most 
haj/py!" 

VISITS FORMER FRIENDS. 



The Kev. Bather J- H. BUtfabraiul. 
who is now in charge of one of the 
most iuaportant parishes in Evnns- 
ville, spent several days in New Al- 
hany and vicinity this week. He was 
for several years pastor of the 
Church of St! Mary's of the Knpb*, 
in Lafayette township, and return* 
( i rationally to see his old friends. 

OLDEST UNIVERSITY. 

The Jesuit fathers claim to have 
established the first university in 
North America. It Is called Laval 
University, and is located at Quebec. 
This Institution of learning was 
founded 270 years ago. It is still 
Catholic and floi 



LARGEST and ]J]<:ST 

I N THE CITY. 

UNITED LAUNDRY CO. 

INCOKPOKATED 

HAND WORK A SPECIALTY. ^- aa ^> 

(JOOI)S CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

BOTH PHONES 1188-493-732 

MAIN OFFICE— 504 SIXTH, NEAR GREEN. 



FALLS CITY MEAT MARKET 

352 SECOND STREET. I. F. SULLIVAN, Managsr. 

iiic.vDoi vim'ickn i on- 
Dressed Poultry and Game of All Kinds in Season 



Cut* of Beef, Spring 

Pule- 



You can alwaya find the beat the market affords in Choice 

Lamb. Pork and Cured Meats of all kinda. Also the Best and Purest Lard in' tha 
City. We also carry Early Fruits and Vegetables and all first-class market producta 

L0UISTILLE PACKING COMPANY'S MEATS ONLY. 



me Ghas. fl. Rogers book go. 

PRAYER ROOKS AND ROSARIES 

TO SUIT EVERY TASTE 

They are the 



ot roo 

finest of their kiud iti the city. 

| BOOKS, MAGAZINES AND RELIGIOUS ARTICLES 

I OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

S -5:34L W\ J«3ff€?rs*on Street. 




Shorthand and Typewriting 

Beliable System. as taught at this institution is a valuable 

acquisition to any person. A stepping stone 
to success. Secures the best employment, 
Spencerian graduates are always in demand. 

r 




mi/ 



COMMERCIAL SCHOOL, 

TBD. la'-'i S.ll.nal «»p» MMa 

5? 



icrorvnitc DFPatTiuiEr ** T 

'. Harrln A SptiKtr. 



SU a and atjln SirrflV 
LOUISVILLE. 



THEO. WALLER 



MANUFACTURER OF 




GENTS' FINE SHOES. 

FINE REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 
502 Fifth Avenue, bet Green and Walnut Streets. 



f 



A 



"~ , v " 



- 



HOME PHONE 1805. 



Sam. L. Robertson, 



Granitoid and Cement 
^ Paving — ~ 

Concrete Constructing and Fireproofing. 

I 

Office and Residence 2312 Griffiths Ave., Louisville. 



GRATTAN 




RlOQtMttl Son of Krln Who Led 
Eight For < uthollo 
IJbprty. 



BOTH PHONES 1988. 

Wm. D. Fowler 



IWHITE HEART 



W W W W WW WW W W W ww + WW WWWW wwww 



= 



One Km Who Took Advantage 
of KiiKlainrH <ireat 

Peril. 



ECLIPSE 
STABLES 



Backed B) an Irish Army He 

Be car e d <Jr«>nt O o ae aia k i a i 

at < >••«-«'. 



NED FIGHTING FOR THE RIGHT 



PURE MILK THAT IS (iOOD 

GOOD MILK THAT IS PURE 

IS THE BEST PURE FOOD YOU CAN USE. 
BOTH PHONES 1028. 

Prompt and Regular Delivery. 

D. H. EWING'S SONS, 

M2 WEST BRECKINRIDGE STREET. 



i 



o 



HULSKAMP'S 



Livery, Boarding and Sales Stables 
220-228 WEST GREEN. 



Mm. I Black Skinned Woman Who O 
Was Many War* A 
Slave. 



C. J. Schneider 



Dealer in choice 



CUT-RATE 



DRUG STORE, 

WHISKIES. 

B0T>t PHONES 2238. 



N. W. COR. SIXTH AND KENTUCKY SIS | 




T. C. CAUMMISAR & SONS, 

Manulactunrt of and 0«alirs In 

BROOMS, BASKETS, BURLAPS, EXCELSIOR AND 
MANUFACTURERS SUPPLIES. 

DEALERS IN 

Hay, Corn, Oats and Mill Feed, 



PHONES: S»!S.3i& 



OHice: 123 Third St. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

JOHN HARDY 



■DKALKK IN- 



Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Canned Goods, Fruits, Vegetables, 
Teas, Coffees and Spices. 



BOTH PHONES. 



2001 BANK STREET. 



OOCH>CK>0!<Xh>CmXh>C«Xh>ChXm>>Xm:' Cm>XKmX^:<<mX>Ch>>00000«XmXhX' .j. 

Mil PMl 5367. FAMILY TRADE SOLICITED. 

CONCORDIA LIQUOR HOUSE, 

F. J. ECHSNER, Proprietor. 

FINE WINES AND WHISKEYS: 

, , 'i 

Telephone Orders Promptly Attended to. £ 
S. E. COR HANCOCK AND JEFFERSON STS. t 

^>0<XhXm>000<mXmX><m}00<^^ 




g(IH »«.».«) - 




, a> 



Send for sample LOUISVILLE PAPER CO. Louisville. Hy. 



£ CHARLES I. NADORFF. JOHN B. NADORFF 



NADORFF BROS. 

4TJIVIOJX BAK 

Merchants' Lunch from 9 till I. Lunch always ready, 
mm phone ^j. s ccon d $ t . Bet. Market and Jefferson 



One of the grandest figures In Irish 
modern history was Henry Grattan, 
a man of brilliant mind, strong 
willed, of gifted tongue and full of 
patriotism. Though not a Catholic, 
he waB ever battling for their rights 
and spent the best years of his life 
in their cause. He died while still 
espousing the cause of Ireland and 
Irish Catholics. 

Henry (irattan was born In Dublin, 
on July 3, 1746. His father was Re- 
corder of Dublin and member of the 
Irish l'arlianient. but a man of fiery 
temperament, and because his son 
dared to entertain an opinion of his 
nun (he father cut young Henry off 
without a shilling In his will. Fortu- 
nately for the youth, his mother was 
of different temperament, and set 
aside a portion of her estate in order 
that the boy might devote himself to 
the career he had marked out. 

From boyhood young Grattan was 
passionately devoted to literature 
and oratory. He made a shining rec- 
ord at Trinity College, and at twenty- 
one years of age he was called to the 
bar. Almost Immediately he went to 
London, but Instead of revelling with 
the youngsters of those days he spent 
all his lime in the courts or in the 
halls where he could hear the great- 
est orators of his time. At night 
i.nr young hero would walk the floor 
of his room and address Imaginary 
juries and assemblies. His hoarding 
house mistress feared that the young 
man was daft and appealed to his 
friends to do something for him. 
During the few years he spent In 
London he was fitting himself for 
work that was to follow. 

In 17fi8 he returned to Ireland and 
at once became a friend of the lead- 
ing Irish patriots of that time. One 
of his closest friends wns Harry 
Flood, the leader of the patriot! In 
the Irish Parliament In College 
Green. When Flood succumbed to 
Hrltish allurements and accepted of- 
fice from the Government his follow- 
ers dropped away, and the friendship 
that had existed for several years be- 
tween Grattan and Flood was se- 
vered. Grattan entered the Irish 
Parliament in 177!». He was quick 
to realize that England's peril was 
Ireland's opportunity, and at the age 
of twenty-nine years found himself 
the Irish leader. Tie wanted to se- 
cure Independence for his country 
and set about his task with great 
skill and cunning. The American 
colonies were In revolt; such terrible 
fellows ns "Saucy .lack Parry" and 
Paul Jones were scouring the seas. 
Some of the pro-English Irish were 
afraid, of an attack on their towns. 
France sympathized with the Ameri- 
cans and might make a descent upon 
Ireland at any time. Kngland had 
all her available soldiers on the 
other side of the Atlantic ocean, and 
when the alarmed Mayor of Belfast 
appealed to the Prltlsh Government 
for military aid he was informed (hat 
Ireland would have to look to Itself. 
This was just what Grattan wanted, 
and on his advice Ireland did look to 
Itself. A fever of military en- 
thusiasm swept over the country and 
In each of the four Provinces thou- 
sands of men armed themselves, and 
drilled regularly, nominally to resist 
France. In reality It was the greatest 
constitutional revolution In history. 
Before Kngland knew what was hap- 
pening there were 60.000 Irishmen 
under arms. For the first time since 
the surrender of Limerick there was 
a force of armed men able and will- 
ing to support a national cause. 
Grattan In the twinkling of an eye 
silenced all talk of resisting foreign 
Invasion. The voice of the Nation 
was calling loudly for redress of Its 
domestic grievances. Ixird Charle- 
mont was the leader of the Irish Vol- 
unteers, Henry Grnttan and Harry 
Flood were their principal Colonels. 
The Volunteers formed themselves 
Into an organized convention for the 
purpose of agitating the national 
wrongs. With an army «t his back 
Grattan was confident. The Govern- 
ment had Washington and the Ameri- 
can rebels to contend with and had 
to give way to the young Irish lead- 
er's demands. Everything Grattan 
asked for was granted: the hateful 
sixth act of George I. was repealed, 
the members of Parliament addressed 
a free people. The horrors ot the 
penal code were no longer enforced 
and Grattan began at once to work 
for Catholic emancipation. In 177R, 
1 7 R 2 and 1792 he caused relief bills 
to be passed, but the right of Cath- 
olics to enter Parliament was still 
denied. Thanks to Grattan's elo- 
quence, the Catholics were enabled 
In 1793 to vote for members of Par- 
liament, but he was never able to 
secure them a right to a seat In Par- 
liament. That failure precipitated 
the rebellion of 1798, and Grattan 
retired to private life. After the re. 
belllon had been put down he was 
elected to the Prltlsh Parliament 
from Dublin In 1805. and soon after 
died whllo flehting the battles of the 
Irish Catholics. 



Hams, Bacon, 
Pork, Lard, 
Sausages, Etc. 



STALL No. 2, KENTUCKY MARKET. 
Fifth and Green Streets. 



Agent for the American, Cunard and 
White Star Passenger Steamships. 
Drafts on Great Britain 
and Ireland. 

M.Sheehan 

Staple and 
Fancy Grocer. 

Dealer la Foreign and Domestic Cigars 
and Tobacco. 

I854-I856 PORl LAND AVENUE. 



Wns Took and Housekeeper For 
the Flrwt lx>ulsvllle 
Bishop. 



Prominent local Catholics Were 
Her Pnll-Bcjirer* 
Sunday. 



WAS ALMOST A CENTENARIAN 



HICKEY & DONNELLY! 

J. CAFE s 

w. Ol*i£i£]V STREET: 

TWV OUR 

j WINES. LIQUORS AND CIGARS 

Our stock includes all the leading brands of straight 
goods. No blends, compounds or imitations. Cool 
and Fresh Beer always on tap. During the season 
we will serve the 

BEST FRIED OYSTER 

To be found in the city. After the theater call and try one. 



JAMES A. WELSH, 

PLUMBING AND 
GAS FITTING. 

Repair Work Promptly Attended To. 
HOME PHONE 6382. 

615 W. OAK STREET. 



HOLDS FRIENDS. 



Meyer tillpp Is One Man 
Who Appreciates Kind 
Treatment. 



Meyer H. Ililpp. the v-teran whole- 
sale dealer In old Iron and metal. Is 
Increasing his large business, at 513 
East Market street, year by year. Of 
the many clever merchants in Louis- 
ville none are more kindly disposed 
than Meyer Hllpp. He has more 
friends among Irish-Americans and 
Catholics than any other Hebrew in 
this city. No man ever asked Meyer 
Hllpp lor a favor and was refused. 
When the orphans' bazar was held 
at Llederkranz Hall seven years ago 
Meyer Hllpp was there every night 
and did as much to make that char- 
itable affair a success as any other 
one man In Louisville. 

He knows Kentucky from one end 
to the other; is a friend of the Trap- 
plsl monks at Cethsemane. nnd is 
acquainted with practically every 
priest in the diocese. If he ever 
made an enemy none know It, but 
he can count his friends by the thou, 
sands. In his business Mr. Hllpp op- 
erates on a larger scale than any 
similar house in the South, having 
had many contracts of mammoth pro- 
portions. Honorable In all his deal- 
ings, he deserves the success that ha* 
come to him. 



QUEEB HI It ASKS. 



English Expressions Are of 
Ancient and Strange 
Origin. 



That some of our every day words 
and phrases have a very ancient 
origin Is shown by a student of folk- 
lore. 

"Take," he says, "the phrase 
helterskelter.' This dates back to 
the defeat of the Spanish Armada, 
some of the vessels of which, driven 
by stress of weather, took refuge 
north to the River Helder and south 
to the River Skelder (or Scheldt). 

" 'Where the shoe pinches' Is one 
of the oldest phrases. In Its Latin 
form the old Romans used It. the 
story being that a Roman who had 
divorced his wife was* taken to task 
by his friends, who protested that 
they could see no fault in the woman. 
The object of their criticism .re- 
sponded by taking off his shoe. "It 
seems « good shoe,' said he. 'You 
will see no fault In It — but none of 
you can Jell where It pinches me.' 

"To 'dun' a man for debt arose 
from the name of a bailiff of Lin- 
coln. Joseph Bun. a champion debt 
eojlector; while 'hurrah" or 'hur- 
ray!' Is a corruption of 'tur aie!' 
the war cry of the old Norse sea 
rovers." 



BOSTON'S DOUBLE EVENT. 



CUMB. MAIN 



ANCIENT EDIFICE CONDEMNED. 

The Santa Vera Crnz. or Holy 
Cross church. In the City of Mexico, 
has been condemned by that city's 
Building Inspector and will have to 
be torn down and rebuilt, at least In 
part. It Is one of the oldest Catholic 
houses of worship on this continent. 
Its erection began in ir>20, and was 
completed In 1520. Even today It 
la considered to be one of the most 
artistic bits of architecture In the 
world. 



The people of Boston have a 
double celebration every St. Pat- 
rick's day. History shows us that 
the British soldiers began the siege 
of that city on March 2, 1776. Seven 
days later Washington and his raw 
troops succeeded In erecting several 
fortifications from which they poured 
a hot fire Into Lord Howe and his 
red coats. 8uch a terrific cannonad- 
ing was kept up that on March 17 
the Britons marched away and left 
the American soldiers in possession. 
Boston people who are not even o? 
Irish blood celebrate Evacuation day. 



Few people who passed the home 
for the aged and Infirm, conducted 
by the Little Sisters of the Poor, last 
Sunday morning gave heed to the 
line of carrtages that followed a 
hearse on Its way to St. Ix>ul8 ceme- 
tery, and yet there was the founda- 
tion for a human-Interest siory that 
city editors ddte when they do not 
anecdote upon. 

The hearse contained all that was 
mortal of Mnry Narcissa Frederick, 
a negro woman, and the mourners 
and pall-bearers were white people. 
She had been a slave, but did not 
desert her former masters after the 
act of emancipation, and for ninetv- 
nlne years she had lived a faithful 
Catholic and died in that faith. The 
mourners and pall-bearers were 
members of the oldest Catholic fam- 
ilies In Virginia and Kentucky, but 
not one was ashamed to shed tears 
when "Mammy" Frederick, as they 
called her, was laid away. North of 
the Ohio river newspapers are wont 
to criticise the people of the South 
for their treatment of the negroes, 
but the Incident that occurred last 
Sunday ought to put a curtailment, if 
not nn entire stoppage, to these ad- 
verse criticisms. 8urely no Northern 
city can show spell royal devotion to 
a colored servant as in Louisville. 

Mnry Narcissa Frederick was born 
In Virginia ninety-nine years ago. 
She was a slave and belonged at that 
time to a planter of French nativity. 
When she arrived in Kentucky, 
years after, she was a grown woman, 
hut was not acquainted with the 
Anglo-Saxon tongue. She knew 
French and that language alone, but 
she could read and write nnd sing 
French songs. On her arrival In 
Kentucky she was owned by a 
planter whose name was Lee. This 
man owed a debt of $10,000 to 
James Uudd. father of our present 
well beloved cltlze i John Rudd and 
of the late and honored Charles P. 
Etafld, Mr. Lee lost all his money, 
and In return for his debt of $m.ftnO 
had nothing to give James Rudd ex- 
cept the negro slave. Mary Narcissa. 
That transfer was made more than 
seventy-five years ago. In speaking 
of the matter to a representative of 
the Kentucky Irish American John 
Rudd said last Saturday: "She was 
worth every cent, and more, too. of 
that J10.000." 

When the seat of the diocese of 
Louisville was removed Irom Bards- 
town, and Bishop Flaget took up bis 
quarters here, she was one of the 
very few negroes in Kentucky who 
could speak French. James Rudd 
sent her to Bishop Flaget to be his 
cook, housekeeper and tnaid-of-all- 
work. Still she remained a slave. 
Later she returned to the Rudd fam- 
ily as housekeeper, nurse and confi- 
dent ial servant. She was the old 
black mammy of nntl-clvil war days, 
but she was dear to the Rudds, the 
Alexanders and the Fetters. She 
lived to see more than thirty of them 
grow to manhood and womanhood, 
hut with her own hands she pre- 
pared many others of those old fam- 
ilies for the grave. 

For years past John Rudd. fierald 
Alexander and his brother, the late 
Senator Alexander, and James M. 
Fetter, one of Louisville's leading 
financiers, took care of Mammy 
Frederick. She had her own home 
In her own nnme, and left it only 
because she was so feeble that she 
could not make her way to mass 
every morning. Her old friends and 
devoted former masters sent her to 
the Little Sisters of the Poor at her 
own request. There she remained 
until her death last Friday. 

This remarkable old colored 
woman was one of the first members 
of St. Augustine's church and could 
tell many Interesting stories of 
early dayB in Louisville. She had 
remlnescenses of Bishop Flaget. 
Archbishop Martin John Spalding. 
Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, of 
Peoria, and other priests and pre- 
lates. The boys whom she had 
cared for In their Infancy, and whose 
children she had cared for. wanted 
to be her pall-bearers, but only 
James M. Fetter and John Rudd 
were In the city when she died. Re- 
quiem mass for the repose of her 
soul was celebrated at. the Little 
Sisters of the Poor last Saturday, 
and on the following morning the 
ladles and gentlemen of the Alex- 
ander. Rudd and Fetter families ac- 
companied her remains to St. brail 
cemetery, and saw Mary Narcissa's 
body Interred In the family lot Ht 
the feet of her "old Master and 
Missus." and beside the graves of 
eight little ones that «die had pre- 
pared for burial. 

This woman was very tall and very- 
corpulent. For an ex-slave she was 
remarkably well read, and some of 
those who knew her well declare 
"Her skin was black, but her heart 
and soul were white." 



HARRY BURTON. Prest 



TREVOR H. WHAYNE VICE PREST. <► 



BURTON-WHAYNE COMPANY, 

INCORPORATED 

REAL ESTATE, HOUSE AGENTS, 



AUCTIONEERS AND APPRAISERS. 

Special attention given to auction sales, loans and real estate, 
paper negotiated, rents collected, repairs made, taxes paid, 
interests of clients watt lied. 

both phones loio 237-239 FIFTH STREET. 




JACOB KRAUSS. 

The Storm Buggy 

...AND... 

Park Wagon Maker 

206 FIRST ST. 



FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 



CIGARS AND T0PACC0S 



< > 

Louis B. Dugan's jj 

HOT SOUP AND LUNCH. 
home phone U24 S ] E.. COR. 7th AND ZANE. : : 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



1ELEPHONE 1050. 



DECKEL'S GROCERY 



Shelby and Jefferson. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ; * 

JOHN J. BARRY, 

...SALOON^. 



I FINE WINES AND LIQIORS, 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS, i 



HOME PHONE 3099 



153* J®. MARKET. !! 



•:»:~:~:~x~: 



ELECTED HUSH MAYOR. 



Mil. MOB! DOOM. 

St. Joseph's Hospital. Chicago. III., 
is to be enlarged by the addition of 
two extra stories and a six-story 
wing. The top floor will be used as 
a solarium. 



Qulney. Mass., one of the oldest 
and formerly one of the most ex- 
clusive towns in New England, now 
has a Mayor of Irish blood. His 
name Is William F. Shea. He was 
born in that city and of Irish par- 
ents In 1877. His campaign was 
conducted on absolutely clean lines. 
He has held many offices In the gift 
of Qulncy's people. 

ACCIDENTS FKI'.QI' ENT. 



There is an overage of one lejr^ or 
arm njnipnitaAed in New York CLty 
each day in consequence of accidents 
caused by f'jrface. efwated or sub 
way cars, 



i>y f 

7 



YOU CANT ADVERTISE 1 

WITHOUT A PRINTER 

And the better your printing the better you advertise. Vour 
catalogue must tell your storv completely and clearly. Your 
booklet or folder must state vour argument clearly and 
artistically. Your stationery and follow-up lettere must be 
worthy of you. It will cost no more than others. 

SMITH & DUGAN, I 



Phone 2940. 



:i:{4 WEST ma IX ST. 



FINE WINES AND LIQUORS. HOME PHONE 2821 j 

< 

GARVEYS' CAFE, j 



HOT LUNCH. 
FIFTH STREET BET. JEFFERSON AND GREEN. 





ECONOMY SALE 



-IN- 



FULL SWING. 

Great Values In All Departments. 

Don't fail to attend this sale as it means a 
| saving on every dollar you spend with us. 

QATHOF'S at 



'•THE BUSY CORNER 



Seventh and Oak Market 
and Family Grocery 

OUR MEATS ARE THE FINEST 

Mackin & Glynn 

THE RELIABLE OROCERYMEN. 

# 

Call up 1513 and have our solicitors call on you. 
Trading Stamps With All Purchases. 




m 

INCORPORATED 



<►.► 

on 
no 

<►<► 
<lo 

<>.► 

<>,► 
<><► 

IN) 
<>,, 
<H> 
oo 
no 



!::: 50c Worth of Tea, Coffee, A. & P. Spices, Baking Powder or Extracts, ijjj 



<►<> 
I Ml 
■ Ml 
OO 
oo 
<>« . 
<>< I 
<><> 
<>o 
OO 
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<><> 
oo 

<><► 

<>«> 
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oo 

. >< 1 

< X > 

- >< 1 

oo 
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ENAMELED SAUCE PANS GIVEN AWAY.fi 

The Tea and Coffee Store at 



FOURTH AND JEFFERSON STS. 
431 EAST MARKET STREET. 
226 PEARL ST., NEW ALBANY. 



Wi I Qive an ADAMONT SAUCE PAN FREE to Purchasers of 



OR 4<> GREEN TRADING STAMPS. 



1() 

STAMPS 
With 5 Bars Our 
White Floating 
Soap at 



•••COUPON... 

Thi. coupon when hroiiKhl to the Mm will »*• (rmxl for 10 
nililittonnl stamp* extra to purchases of 50c worth. 

NOT GOOD AFTER MARCH 21»T. 


10 


to 


STAMPS with 1 bottle A. & 


STAMPS with 1 bottle C.ul- 


P. Ammonia. 


(kn it Kssfcrfd, 


lOo 


lOo 



to 

STAMPS 
With 2 Cartons A. 
&. P. Washing 
Powder at 

lOo 



HO. -XI 
BOTH PHONES 687 



OK PURI VOOU i • l* « > OUOTsl • 

BRANCH STORE, HOME PHONE 3H. 



jj The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., EEflS^FS 1 

!!t INCOHl'OHATBI). 



<><> 

'! :♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»< 



PASLICK, 



HIBERNIAiNS. 

What They Have Keen Doing 
the Past Week— General 



t-n k«'cj> their friends, mk! 
I the bock will find many \\1 
' gind t<> weloomn it for the i 
I litis nada, 

TO ST. I'M HICK. 



just no\> 

o will be 
neniie* It 



regular 



HlllC. \ 

parades 
qaets nt 

t sllll- 

s <l m 

rin i is- 



Chas. J. Cronan 



REAL ESTATE. 



HOME PHONE I6I4. 

313 LOUISVILLE TRUST BLDG. 



Red I'ridny will lie the 
meeting night for Divlaioa 

Moth in Trenton and Bajf 
J., than will be big at reel 
Tuesday aft moor and bah 
night. 

officer-* of Dtrfarion 3 expt 

jeots of interest will lie disei 
tin meeting to iie held next 

day night. 

The regular meeting of .leffersoa* 
\! lie's division will give way to the 
St. 1'atriekV <lay eeleliration next 
Tuesday evening. 

Division 1 heM ■ rousing meeting 
last night, anil nil the members were 
eiiMuisiiiMl k 1 over the eoming celebra- 
tion of St. Patrick'* <lay. 
.lames Treston, a new manlier of 
red up 

s initiation with the 

anplloatlan <if a candidate. 

ThOtnae Kinney Miys he has sev- 
eral new members in prospect for 
Division :t, and expects to present 
their applications before Easter. 

The divisions and Lndies' Aux- 
iliary of Sioux City. Iowa, will unite 
in a' special literary prograiuine and 
banquet in honor of St. Patrick next 
Tuesday night. 

.lust watch Division 4. A few 
weeks ago thirty-two of the thirty- 
six candidates initiated bclongo! to 
that branch, and now she has twenty* 
five more ready for initiation. 

When ■the four local divisions nn I 
the Indies' Auxiliary approiich holy 
communion at St. Patrick'! church 
•tomorrow morning the edifice will be 
crowded to witness the <«lifying 

■tght 



Division :t. Hhowed up at the firvt 
meeting afler hi 



Hall! Holy Apostle, from ocenn to 
ocean 

The sons of old Erin, in brilliant 
array. 

Ar». tweeting t't shrines, full of heart- 
felt devotion, 
To greet you on this, your St. 
Patrick's day. 

Though our country Is drear. 
Your memory's held dear. 
And faith's shining lamp still Illum- 
ines the way. 
We're still true to our sirelnnd 
And the shnmrock of Ireland. 
Altho' exiles we be on St. Patrick's 
day. 

Now pray that we may ever keep 
the straight way 
As through life's journey we con- 
tinue to roll. 
And we pray that you'll meet us 
And In Paradise greet us 

When we will arrive nt our heav- 
enly goal. — B. P. J. K. 



IRELAND. 



Kecord of the riost Important nt 
the Recent Event.* Culled 
From Exchange*. 



has been up 
in Conn, s 



im- 

tlie 



of 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS. 

Late News That Will Interest 
Members Here and Else- 
where. 



FA I R MEN 



Differ In Faith But R< 
Attack on Catholic 
Cardinal. 



EDWARD H. MARCUS 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass 
*j* and Brushes. «# 

4 i 

AGENTS FOR THE 

LUCAS TINTED GLOSS PAINT 

IT WON T COME OFF. 

i*:«>~ 1 :t iv. MARKET ST. 



Hegardless of creed, the ministers 
of Milwaukee have denounced the 
attacks made by angry Prohi- 
bitionists against Cardjnnl Gibbons. 

"The attacks are all rot." said the 
Rev. Kdwards. of St. .lames' Episco- 
pal, "and are not worthy of consider- 
ation. They are absurd to any one 
who knows Cardinal Gibbons and for 
thnt reason I must confess that I 
have paid little attention to them." 

"The attack !s unwarranted, with- 
out foundation and absurd In every 
particular," said .the Rev. Judson 
Titsworth, of Plymouth Congrega- 
tional church. Rev. Thomas Barnev. 
of the same church, said he consid- 
ered the attack on Curdtnal Gibbons 
"as one of the most dastardly at- 
tempts at besmirching the good name 
of a good man that has ever come to 
my attention." 

. "1 do not think that any one who 
is acquainted with Cardinal Gib- 
bons, either through his public life 
or personally, will attribute his stand 
on the prohibition 'question to any- 
thing but an honest expression of 
his own personal opinion," said Will- 
iam Austin Smith, of St. Paul's 
Episcopal church. 

"I think that the recent attacks 
made by the press of the prohibition 
party on Cardinal Gibbons nre un- 
founded and made without a thor- 
ough understanding of what Cardinal 
Gibbons advocates or opposes," was 
the view of Rev. Henry Cilman. of 
Simpson Methodist Episcopal church. 



HOME PHONE 1475 



CUMB. Main 3999.* 



NUGENT SAND CO. 

RIVER SAND AND GRAVEL 
LIME AND CEMENT. 

Docks, 5th and River. Office, 243 Fifth St. 



Albert T. Schranz & Co., 

REAL ESTATE 



CUMB. PHONE MAIN 27-y 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
MONEY TO LOAN. 

Room I, Law Bldg., Center and Green, 



A new council is to be organized 
nt East Dubuque, Iowa. 

Lexington Council is organizing a 
class for Initiation after Easter. 

Providence Knights have arranged 
to establish a permanent down town 
headquartets in that city. 

No less than 150 couples attended 
the last of Milwaukee Council's pre- 
l.enteii nve.pt ioru* and dances on the 
night of March 3. 

Assemblyman A. K. Smith, of th.- 
New York Legislature, i.s iiruMng llie 
iMssnge of a bill to make bending 
day a legal holiday in that Mate. 

If the bill introduced in tbo New 
,1'Tsey Legislature by Assemblyman 
Hrauu becomes a law Lauding day. 
October 12. will he henceforth a holi- 
day in that State. 

At Pulton, N. V., the "Forty-five" 
tournnmK«vt resulted os follows: 
Knights of Columbus. 1S2: GfcVtholit! 
Mutual Benevolent Association, lsii; 
Bed Men, 178. 

The John RoyV O'Reilly Club. at. 
ndjunot of Denver Council, held it . 
own celebration of Robert Emmet'.- 
birthilay. The programme was re- 
plete with vocal nnd inut rumenta! 
music nnd excellent addresses. 

The latest available statistics of 
the membership of the order show 
a total of 194.972. but of these only 
63. IRQ are Insurance members. Therf 
are 1.253 separate councils In the 
Cnited States, Canada, the Philippine 
Islands and Mexico. There is 
$2,250,000 in the national treasury 



NEW HOME. 



The city of Limerick expect* t 

apead glSa/MO on itrera paving th 
year. 

ixniis a. Crawford 
pointed notary pnbli 
Donegal. 

Hev. Father Maurice Day. of C 

met, has been elected >raotor of 

Cathedral at Oushcl. 

The annual Point-to-Point riu 
will be held at Broooi field instead 
art Killahrick this year. 

The untenanted hinds on Miss 
Rise's cstaitc. County Louth, are 
about to be distributed. 

John Hums, a resident of Bnni*> 
keen, Bear Kingsciiun. was found 
dead In bed. Death was due to heart 
failure. 

Mrs. Catherine ("ampeon. wife oi 

.the sta.1ionma.ster at l.istowel, and 
a leading spirit in church anil ehar- 
itahlc work, died rcc/.ntly. 

A branch of the Catholic Young 
Men's Society bas Ik en founded at 
Middle town. The aim is to tivicli 
temperance nnd self respect. 

Mrs. Margaret Ilrennan. mother o f 
the ltev. Father Patrick Itreiiuan, of 
Cooiest ISW B| died at lu r home. Dub- 
lin Lit.tl i. County Louth, at an ad- 
vanced nge. 

Paul Dunne, son of William Dunne, 
of Dapdalk. died at file home in 
Ckmakeagh eftef n long and patient 
suffering. He was n young man of 
brilliant parts. 

Magistrate Jamee Keeleghan, of 
Cast leblaney. is dead after a pro- 
t racted illness. He was well and 
favorably known in his own and ud- 
jacent counties. 

Children of the late Mrs. Ifary 
Johnaoa, of Prampleatuwn. have pre- 
sented a pulpit, prayer book and sent 
to K-t. .Tomes' ,-hurch, Castledermot. 
in m<«nory of their mother. 

The clothing of n man ha.s been 
found on the «idc of the Clover 
quarry, County Monnghan, and it is 
feared some insane person has com- 
mitted suicide in the quarry pool. 

Francis Joseph Rigger, M. 1(. I. A 
delivered n sphmdid Illustrated lec- 
ture at. Clones and took his audience 
all over the "Holy Hills'' of Ireland. 
He is being importuned to repeal his 
lecture in various parts of the coun- 

try.- 

The falling off in the subscriptions 

to the Irish Parliamentary fund i« 

•lausing alarm. Ihiring I!i07 th" 
subscript ions amounted to 137,000 as 
against $70,000 for the previous ye n\ 
It is hoped that Mm union of all the 
elements in the, party will cause the 
subscriptions to Increase this yea 

Nicholas Morrissy, a (small farmer 
near New Ross, County Waterford. 
is WsUting trial <m the eharg 
n«unler. He is accused of having 
killed Steph'Tt Wnlsli, a neighbor 
The evidence against him is purely 
eirenfnfetantiaL 



REAL ESTATE AND LOANS 

REFERENCES: German Bank, Ger- 
man Insurance Bank, Fidelity Trust 
Co., Louisville Trust Co., and others. 

Room 302 Louisville Trust Co. 

S. W. Corner 5th and Market Sts. 



R L NUGENT & CO,, 

• REAL ESTATE BROKERS 

Money Loaned on City Real Estate First 
Mortgage Real Estate Bonds for Sale. 

a 

243 FIFTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



** FCI.L LINK OF HOUSE FURNISHING <;()()I)S. 



GEO. DEHLER, JR., 
Hardware and Cutlery 

IRON, NAILS, WAU0N MATERIAL, 
I'LOWS. FARMERS' TOOLS, ETC. 

Agfnlr. Nortliwcstirn Horse Nails. ASstriCM Horse Shoes nnd Hrydrn rails. 
ORDER BY PHONE 832. 

404, 406, 408, 410. 412 E. Market St., ^^ew^ar me rs'Iiomk 



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HOME PHONE 7569 



CUflB. WEST 09 



BOCK BEER 

Falls Gity Brewery Product. 



IS OUT TODAY. 

On Sale Everywhere and Can be Secured 
in Cases for the home. 



TRY A CASE. 



•x-m~:-:-x-m~:-k-:-x-:~:-:~:" 



Sisters of Providence De- 
sire Building; Completed 
in Haste. 



HOCK HKEK. 



Sons of the Emerald Isle draw no 
race distinctions when it comes tT 
the beck beer Ren son. They have 
loomed to love beer almost as well 
as their Oirman n°ighborw. The 
lager beer brewers ami agencies in 
the Falls Cities announce that bock 
will be on tap today, and the news 
will be accepted es n harbinger of 
spring, with a reservation in favor 
of a Tittle nVdayed winter that is gen- 
erally <tue about the seventeenth. But 
the practical fienmans, mindful of 
the eccentric character of the early 
spring in 'these northern lartiitAides. 
have wisefly put a little more 
wtremgth In the bock than in the 
ordinary lager, and this will serve 
to make it quite safe for even a 
Hibernian th join in celebrating the 
coming of spring with lager of the 
bock brand. The cnei>if« of the 
liquor traffic have made a warfare 
on the beer industry as well as en 
wines ami liquors, but the/ continue 



The plans for the new House of 
Providence at Syracuse, N. Y., have 
been accepted and the work of re- 
building will begin as soon as the 
weather will permit. The former 
structure was burned a few months 
ago, but the Sisters and their youth- 
ful charges escaped without injury. 

The new structure will be erected 
of brick and stone and will be four 
and one-half stories tall. The main 
building will have a depth of slxty- 
eeven feet and will be 225 feet long. 
The chapel and bakery will be sep- 
arate buildings, but will be joined 
to the main edifice. A cold storage 
plant will be annexed to the kitchen. 
On the main floor there will be a 
study hall thirty-two feet wide and 
fifty-nine feet long and will be fitted 
with modern desks and a stage for 
entertainments. Each of the six 
rooms on the main floor will be 
twenty-seven feet aquare. The main 
floors will be used for refectories, 
dormitories and Infirmaries. 

The exterior of the building will 
be very plain, yet will be of Imposing 
proportions. It is expected that the 
new home will be completed within 
a year. The Sisters of Providence 
have Instructed the architect to fin- 
ish the work with all possible 
celerity. 



Mi STKIUOUB I K.I BBS. 



I 



speech, 
etlty." 



DKES8 ANI> AGE. 



If woman's tnatin 
style and material, 
to age, then there 
women In Ixmisvillf 



of dre«a, in 
an indication 
e more young 
than in an . 



other city in the Untited States. 



The F»mo U$ old Mcheinia Whiskey 

Is conceded by medical authorities to be a tonic 
of the highest value. If you feel weak and "all 
rundown," give it a trial. There's none better, 
and what's better it costs no more than other 
brands. Persons ourside of the city are requested 
• to write for our 1908 Price List. 

{ HENRY BOSQUET'S OLD BLUE HOUSE, | 

I 215 FOURTH AVE., LOUISVILLE, KY. £ 

•j. <• 

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1 GEORGE J. BUTLER 



FANCY GROCERIES AND PRODUCE, FRESH 
MEATS AND VEGETABLES, CIGARS 
AND TOBACCO. 



Put. down the number of your liv 
ing brothers. 
DauMkl the number. 
Add three. 

Multiply result by five. 
Add number of living sisters. 
Multiply result by ten. . 

Add number of dead brothers and I DEALER IN- 

s inters. 

Substract 150 from the result. 
, The right hand figure will be the 
luwiibcr of deaths. 

The middle figure will be the nuir 
ber of living sisters. 

The left hand figure will be th 
number of living brothers. . 
Strange freak of figures, isn't it? A 

WOMAN'S SEVEN GIFTS. I 

— — ^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 

The Eastern press has it that a 
member of the Gaelic League, now 
lecturing in Dublin, is describing la 
detail the lire* of the Irish p ople 
al the dawn of the Christian era. 
It hi said that then, as now, the Irish 
man and woman oared for the orphan 
boy and girl; that even in thoie re- 
mote days the Irifh woman consid- 
ered It her duty to Instruct her 
daughters In tbe "seven gifts of 
perfect womanhood— beauty, music, 
voice, sweet speech, needlework, 
wisdom and 



HOME PHONE 33S9 



1983 PORTLAND AVE. 



NOTHING SURPRISING! 

WE SELL THE BEST 

5 AND io CENT 

WAIoJ^ PAPER 

IN THE C1TV. No moth eaten patterns. Why not 
buy new goods at game price? 

MONT AN US, 1 18 W. Market St. 



OPTO8ITE HOPKINS THKATBR. 



KENTUCKY IRISH AMERICAN. 



SAVEandHAVE 

WASTE AND WANT. 

You may open a savings account here with as 
little as ONE DOLLAR, or as much as you 
please, and recieve interest COMPOUNDED, 
twice a year on all you put into it. DO IT NOW. 

Ky. Title Savings Bank, | 

FIFTH AND COURT PLACE. 
Open Daily Until 3 p. m. Saturdays Until 7 p. m. 



SAMPLES 



Of 



lUrh lrlKh Wit 
IVn. 



and Humor 
Facile 



ltrlan Horn 
l*lnster 



and the 

Hud 
Tilt. 



King of 



Story of Sultan Who Needed 
the Shirt of a Hnppy 
^ Man. 



JUST A FEW OLD IRISH YARNS 



CUSCADEN'S 

BRICK ICE CREAM 

For Anniversaries or Birthdays. 




Our Vanilla, I'each, Chocolate, Strawberry and Sherbets are as line as silk . Spec- 
ial rates to Picnics, Churches, Lodges, Etc. 

Both Phones 518 and 584. 415-417 SECOND ST. 




Jacob Hoertz, 



Contracting 

I 

Builder and Bricklayer. | 



HOME PHONE 5703. 



1316 FLOYD STREET 



COAL! COAL! 

We have recently established yards in New Albany, Jeffer- 
sonville and South Louisville and solicit orders for all 
kinds of coal from our friends in these cities. 

We handle the best Pittsburgh, Jellico, Moss' Straight 
Creek, St. Bernard, etc. We have yards in all parts of 
Louisville and can therefore gi\t prompt delivery. 

BOTH TELEPHONES 932. 

St. Bernard Mining Co. 



INCOWItlHATKD. 



|| Smith's Crony, ] 

SMITH DISTILLING 
...COMPANY... 



Being the Distiller I Can Give You 
Pure Whiskey at Low Prices. 

Year Old at $2.25 per gallon ! I 

6 " " " 2.50 " 

8 " " " 3.00 " 

10 4.00 " 

14 5.00 " 



INCORPORATED. 



CHICAGO, - - KY 



W. L. SMITH. |j 

327 W. Market St.. Louisville, Ky. 

If good ft not as reprr*cntr<l. return and 
intm y will l»e refunded. 



I Eggers 



TAILOR. 



i! 1 34 W. Market 



WH AKK now in- 
stalled in our new 
quarters. Our spring 
and summer fabrics 
are ready for your 
inspection. You will 
be cordially receiv- 
ed. A suggestion: 
Come soon, before 
things are picked 
over. 



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JOHN SEXTON,!! 



Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

BEST LUNCH IN THE CITY. 

Ho^PHOMj ngr S . W. COR. SEVEN I H AND OAK. j ; 



Jnmes Jeffrey Roche, the brilliant 
lrlsh-Amerlcan, who succeeded John 
Boyle O'Keilly as editor of the 
Boston Pilot, has written an epitome 
of Irish humor, and all his stories 
arp Rood. He says In part: 

American humor differs from that 
of every other nation, and its In- 
gredients defy analysis: but I think 
that It owes a Rreat deal to the llb- 
ernl infusion of Irish blood during 
the last century or more. At least 
there Is nothing at all resembling 
If in the literature or tradition of 
th« early days before and Imme- 
diately after the Revolution. 

The whimsical extravagance of 
statement, the sudden Inversion of 
ideas, and the graw reduction of a 
serious proposition to a delicious 
absurdity — all these traits of what 
we call American humor are dis- 
tinctively Irish also, but Irish quali- 
fied by I certain mock gravity that 
Is partly native to the American soil 
An Irishman from the old country 
notices at once the great difference 
In speech and mnnner between his 
people at home and those trans- 
planted to the United States, espe- 
cially the children of the Immigrants. 
The humor of the American side is 
more tinged with satire It has less 
of cheerful, irresponsible grotesque- 
ness. It provokes a smile where the 
original raises a laugh. 

There Is no history written of 
Irish hjimor. Similarly. although 
very funny things have been said 
ar.d done In prison, there Is no vol- 
ume of Jail Jocosities. The people 
most concerned have had other 
things of a more serious nature to 
occupy their minds. But even the 
grave narratives of early days occa- 
sionally contain a few bright pas- 
sages, lighting up the pages of grim 
tragedy. The first on record Is that 
of the short and spicy correspondence 
Which passed between Brian 
Borohma fBoru). the Ardrlgh or 
High King of nil Ireland, and his 
refractory vassal, the King of 
Lelnstsr. Here It is In full: 

King Brian wrote. "Pay me my 
tribute or If you don't — " 

The King of Lelnster answered. 
"I owe vou no tribute. and if I 
did 

The cleverness of the Irish has 
been proverbial throughout their 
history. The Roman writer who re- 
ferred to the "Perfervldum Ingeniuni 
BOO to ram," meant the brilliance of 
the Irish, and not. as Oliver Wendell 
Holmes supposed, of the Scots. The 
Irish were the Scotl of classic times. 

Nobody at any period ever said 
of the Irish, as the onrly French 
writer did of the Kngllsh. that "they 
take their pleasure sadly." There Is 
an old story- so old that It may 
have been founded on fact — Illustrat- 
ing the proverblnl happiness of the 
Irllh people. Samuel Lover made 
a farce out of It. Sir Walter Scott 
put it Into verse. Both called It 
"The Happv Man." It was about a 
certain Sultan of Serendlh. In the 
Fnr East, who was troubled with 
chronic Insomnia, and was told by 
a wise man that he could be cured 
In only one way. namely by sleeping 
In the shirt of a happv man. The 
Sultan forthwith advertised for a 
happy man with a shirt to sell, or 
to let, hut. strange to say, he could 
not find one In his whole dominion. 
Thereupon he went abroad to look 
for one. He callecr to the Kast. the 
West, the North, and South: hut all 
In vain, until at last he came to the 
shores of Ireland on the edge of the 
Atlantic: and lo! the first thing that 
he saw on landing wns one not onlv 
happv but willing and ready to admit 
(Mil he was happy. Then the Sultan 
signified his desire to get possession 
of that man's Inmost garment. 

But the happy man being happy, 
declined to consider the proposition 
on any terms. Whereupon ensued 
what did not In the least diminish 
the gentleman's cheerfulness, a fight. 
T( was a good fight while It lasted, 
hut the power of numbers triumphed, 
and the victors proceeded benevo- 
lently to assimilate the spoil. But 
alas for the Sultan and the theory 
of mental healing! When they 
stripped the beaten but still un- 
daunted Irishman thev found that 
he did not have a shirt to his hack. 
And In the words of the poet — 
The heartbroken Sultan. In sorrow 

and shame. 
Went back to Serendlb as sad as he 
came. 

Irish wit and humor found their 
best exemplers among the great 
writers, orators and poets, many of 
whom are calmlv classified among 
"English Men of Oenlus." such as 
Swift. Ooldsnilth. Sheridan. Steele. 
Sterne and a score of others. Leigh 
Hunt, no mean judge, said of one 
of them. "For the qualities of sheer 
wit and humor Swift had no su- 
perior, ancient or modern." Oreat 
ns he was. however. Swift lived to 
prove the truth of Dryden's lines: 
Oreat wits are sure to madness near 
allied. 

And thin partitions do their bounds 
divide 

But even In his old age and In- 
sanity his quick Trlsh wit was alive 
and awake. The last thing he ever 
wrote was an Impromptu on the con- 
struction of a magazine for military 
stores, which an attendant pointed 
out to him as they were driving by. 
Ireland had lost her liberties, and 
the Incongrultv of thus elaborately 
locking the stable doors after the 
horses were stolen Inspired the sav- 
age epigram. 

Behold a proof of Irish sense! 
Here Irish wit Is seen; 



SOCIETY DIRECTORY. 



A. O. II. 

DIVISION L 
Meets on the Second and Fourth Fri- 
day Evening's of Each Month. 
President — John M. Mulloy. 
Vice President — Thomas Lawler. 
Recording Secretary — Th.anos 

K wi i . Jr. 

Recording 6ec.— Ttios. Keeuan, Jr. 
Financial Secretary — I'. J. Cnsick. 
Treasurer—Charles J. Finnegan. 

DIVISION 2. 
Meets on the First and Third Fridav 
Evenings of Each- Month. 
President— Con J. Ford. 
Vice President— Dan McKdnna. 
Treasurer— Owen Keiran. 
Recording Secretary — Joseph T. 
Lynch. 

Financial Secretary— J; T. Keaney. 
Sergeant i' \i n, — James Sayers, 
Sentinel — William Nash. 

DIVISION 3. 
Meets First and Third Thursday 
Kvenings Euch Month, Seventeenth 
and Main Streets. 

President — Patrick T. Sullivan. 
Vice President — Martin Shcehan. 
Recording Secretary— L J. Mackey. 
Financial Secretary— J. (i. llcg-ion. 
Treasurer — Daniel J. Dougherty. 
Sentinel — Thomas Noon. 
Sergea nt-at-A rm s — 1 'at r iek Begley. 

DIVISION 4. 
Meets Second and Fourth Mondays. 
Kertrand Hall, Sixth Street. 
President —John II. Ilenm-asy. 
Vice President — Thomas Lynch. 
Fimincial Secretary — William J. 
OonaeUy. 

Recording Secretary — Frank P. 
Burke. 

Treasurer — Harry Brady. 
Sentinel— Michael McDcrmott. ' 
Sergean t -a t-A rm -.1 oh n Doolan. 



STRUCK FLINT. 



Leading Rebre* Babbl 01 tin' 
Hull fold Plain Pacta 

That Hurt. 



DIVISION L JEFI KKSONVII.I.E. 
MeetsVni the First and Third Tues- 
days Each Month at Plait's Hall. 
President — John Kinney. 
Vice President — John b. Cole. 
Treasurer — Bernard A. Coll. 
Recording Secretary — T. O'Hern. 
Financial Secretary — ( has. Roberts. 
Sentinel -Timothy' I). Kenney. 
Ktrahal— William Dorsey, Jr. 
Sonreaiit-at-Arnis- Bernard Coyle. 

■V. JM. I. 

MACKIN COUNCIL, 205. 
Meets Tuesday Kveninps at Club 
House, HQ Twenty -sixth Street. 
President — Robert T. Burke. 
First Vice President — Frank Luna- 
linn. 

Second Vice President — Samuel 
Robertson. 

Recording Secretary— Austin E. 
Walsh. 

Corresponding 1 Secretary— Thomas 
Rachmnn. 

Financial Secretary— Frank 0. 
Adams. 
Treasurer — Dan Weber. 
Marshal— A. And riot t. 
Inside Sentinel— Patrick Duddy. 



FRANK 
MUTH 

STILL IN 

Fifth Street 
Market. 

BOTH PHONES. 



When nothing's left that's worth de- 
fense, 

They build a magazine! 

PURE PRODUCT 



Is That of the Paul Reislnx 
Brewing Company in 
New Albany. 



Hid you ever see a nervous beer 
drinker? Nervousness comes from 
two causes, one Is half-fed nerves. 
The remedy for these is beer. The 
malt In beer is foqd for this class 
of nervous people, while the hops 
act as a tonic. The slight percent- 
age of alcohol Is an aid to digestion, 
and that means more food for the 
entire human system. 

Another cause of nervousness Is 
waste that clogs nerve centers. That 
waste is caused by drinking too little 
to flush the system. The habit of 
Imbibing beer gives the body the 
needed fluid that Is necessary to 
cleanse the organs from Impurities. 
For this reason beer ts prescribed by 
physicians for nervous people and 
Invalids. But to get the best results, 
one must buy fine beer. A poor ar- 
ticle may be worse than the lack of 
any. The Paul Relslng Brewing 
Company, of New Albany, makes an 
nrticle of beer that Is as fine as Is 
Isold anywhere, and every ingredient 
is selected by the best brewmaster 
to be had. nnd its reputation ranks 
I among the best In the country. Every 
j man employed In the brewery is 
skilled nnd experienced. 

The product of this brewery Is as 
popular In Louisville as It Is across 
the river, not only on account of Its 
pleasant taste, but because its purity- 
Is so well krtown. Those who use It 
have found It without a peer, and 
especially Is this true of the two 
famous brands, the "Kaiser" and 
the "Culmbacher. " The principal 
officers of the company are H. L. 
Melnhardt, President, and Rudolph 
Haug, Superintendent. 



mi Anglo-Saxons In ThHr Prl«|fl 
and Was Twtced Called 
to Answer. 



Jewlen Doctor Knew Hi* Ground 
and Made ill* Points 

Count. 



BRITISH SOCIETY DEMORALIZED 



BRIGHT KYF.s IN OOnTCim. 

Among the many local celebra- 
tions of St. Patrick's day none will 
be more quaint 'han that of the 
| "Bright Eyes." a club of young men 
| well and favorably known In the 
I West End. ' The affair will be In the 
' nature of a costume dance, and will 
be held at Nadorff's Hall. Eighteenth 
and Kentucky streets, and the com- 
mittee In charge of affairs promise 
clean fun and lots of It. 



The British ChnrltaJjJe Society of 
Boston celebrated its twenty-flftlit *n- 
nlversary on the night of March 
and one of Its invited guests wns Mr. 
Moses Fleischer, a Hebrew RsbbL 
He told them a few plnln truths that 
almost broke up the meeting. A!l the 
New England papers hnd something 
to say about it. but the Anghi-S.ixon 
dallies of Louisville overlooked the 
matter entirely. 

Thomas J. Bowlker. President of 
the Victoria Club of Boston and 
Vice President of the British Charit- 
able Society, was t:ie p lncipal speak- 
er of the evening nnd his talk for 
the most part concerned the tttpirlor* 
Ity of die British, Bimost every sen- 
tence referring in tribute to ilrail 
Britain cr.d the British. He said in 
part : 

"The period for the conquest of 
new territory has passed for the 
British empire and in the future she 
must conquer the forces of nature 
nnd develop the resources of her great 
possessions. The patient common- 
sense of the English, the firm tenac- 
ity of the Scotch and the dashing 
bravery of the Irish, these are the 
qualities which have OSSSSd us to 
win and to make the British empire 
the foremost power In the world. 

"All the British possess that rov- 
ing spirit, all love enterprise, and this 
pioneer spirit of -bravery and readi- 
ness to sacrifice their blood for their 
country are marked characteristics 
In the Britisher's make-up. The 
magnificent work by the Britishers 
in every corner of the empire has 
established a proud record. We 
must carry with renewed vigor the 
conquest of extending commercial 
enterprise. Fnrest and rebellion 
among those who have not yet 
b inned the principles of self-govern- 
ment must be dealt with according- 
ly. I .efer especially to the condi- 
tions that may exist among the em- 
pire's Indian possessions. 

"What the empire's relations will 
be with the Japanese nnd Chinese is 
a great problem which Is dlstrublng 
the minds of England's leading 
statesmen. The conditions In Can- 
ada and our African possessions *ire 
assuming acute stages and I do not 
believe that the wholesnle Introduc- 
tion of the cheap labor from these 
countries is for the best welfare of 
the British empire." 

Rabbi Flelschser was the next 
speaker: There were no Irish there 
to resent Bowlker's Insinuation, but 
the Jewish Rabbi was equal to the 
occasion. He was to respond to a 
toast selected by a line from Kipling 
— "O! East is East and West Is 
West." Instead he began: 

"1 believe the sentiment of one of 
the speakers of the evening was a 
horrible example of British bump- 
tiousness. I sympathized with the 
Revolutionists of America against 
the mother country and was on the 
side of the Boers in their brave strug- 
gle against the British. In Russia, 
also. I favor the poor unfortunate 
downtrodden, whose economic and 
political conditions are deplorable. I 
believe the British attitude of so- 
called superiority is at the base of 
this evil talk of war with Japan. It 
Is un-American, Indecent and undem- 
ocratic, nnd an evidence of contempt 
for the people of other Bkins and 
other races." 

"Mr. Fleischer." shouted one of 
the members, rising and interrupt- 
ing the speaker, I will frame a re- 
ply to this speech of yours and de- 
liver it in the near future." 

Rabbi Fleischer bowed smilingly 
to the man who interrupted him and 
continued: "Kipling's 'White Man's 
Burden' is sung the world over as 
an example of how the Englishman 
looks out on the world as If he had 
made It Godlike in his own Image — " 

"I cannot stand such talk as this." 
another member of the society ex- 
claimed, somewhat excitedly. Inter- 
rupting the speaker a second time. 
"How about the Philippines?" 

"That," responded Rabbi Fleischer 
in an Instant, "Is something America 
owes to British example. I am an 
antl-imperlallst from the beginning 
to the end, and I shall be until Amer- 
ica stands for democracy the world 
over. I am democratic, and believe 
that society should respect the Indi- 
vidual as well aB the Institution. 

"I believe the British attitude of 
so-called superiority is at the base 
of all this evil talk of war with 
Japan. It is un-American, indecent 
and undemocratic." declared Rabhl 
Charles Fleischer before the members 
of the British Charltahle Society at 
the Twentieth Century Club upon the 
occasion of the society's ninety-sec- 
ond anniversary and banquet. 

Such sentiment as this from a man 
of Rabbi Fleischer's standing, ex- 
pressed in the midst of a gathering 
of native Britons, was like a spark 
of gunpowder, and twice was the 
noted rabbi Interrupted In his speech, 
for. although he was an honored 
guest of the occasion, his words so 
shocked many of his hearers that 
they could not restrain themselves 
from Interrupting. 



SOMETHING UNIQUE. 



The ladles of the Sacred Heart 
parish have arranged to give a candy 
pulling and country store entertain- 
ment in the school hall. Seventeenth 
and Broadway, next Tuesday after- 
noon and evening. It will be their 
way of celebrating St. Patrick's day. 
Each year these same loyal ladles 
entertain the children with a tand.v 
pulling, but this time new features 
will be added. 




VICTOR SPRING BEDS 



ASSURE COMFORTABLE, QUIET REST. 

GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS. 

McELROY-SHANNON SPRING BED MFC, CO-, 



LOUISVILLE. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



DECIDEDLY OF THE FINEST QUALITY. 



OLD 

FORTUNA 

WHISKEY 

BOTTLED IN BOND 

THE PHIL HOLLENBACH GO. 

(Incorporated) DISTILLERS. 



CHARLES BOESWALD, 



-DEALER IN - 



Groceries, Meats and vegetables 

Butter, Eggs and Poultry. 
Home Phone 3266, S. E. Cor. 16th and Walnut 




ocM3C9»o8oettaoecec8ceoec^^ i 

H. A. KRAFT, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



Fresh Beef, Veal, Mutton, 

DRIED TONGUE, CORN, DRIED AND SP.CED BEEF. 

BOTH PHONES 794. 

Stall No. 1, Kentucky NarHet, Fifth and Green Sts. :j: 



I THOMAS E. GrtMHELD. 

CORNIA SALOON 

■ 

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]! Only the Best of Wines, Liquors and Cigars, f 

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.KENTUCKY jRISH AMERICAN. 

Oevotcd to the M .ral a d Social *dvattcemont nf all Irish Americana 
KENTUCKY IRISH AMERICAN PRINTING CO., Incorporated, Publisher. 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICK. MNE HOLLAR I'f-K VP.AR >IN(1LE COM* 5 c 
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Ztr»* a" Commaaicatlani It the KENTUCKY IRISH AMERICAN. 335 17 Wt.t (Ire.-. Si 



Dm 



SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908. 



oi i: BIG NUMBKR. 

Another St. Patrick s day Ik upon 
us. and on«e more the Kentucky 
Irish American ureetj Its friends and 
p:itn.rs In a dress of green. It Is 
t,< t an ensv matter in times of great • 
flnancial depression to get out a 
foiirt.-iMi-i. ip- i«H>er. but we have been 
favored by many rrlends this year, 
nnd an- duly grateful for their gen- 
erous patronage. It has also been 
Hip aim of the editor to give a varied 
sele lion of reading matter In th'<* 
bin edition. How fBr he has been 
successful the readers may judge for 
themselves. Rach year there are new 
readers Tor the Kentucky Irish Amer- 
ican, and the story of Irelnnd. St. 
Patrick and his followers has to be 
repeated. If our efforts please you 
show the paper to some other person 
and commend It for Its news value. 
Thanking our subscribers and- our 
advertisers for their kind patronage, 
we hope that all will live to wear tho 
green on many more St. Patrick's 
days. 

' EDITOR O'MAM.KVS CHANGE. 



Our old friend and contemporary. 
Charles J. O'Malley. who has for 
several years edited the Catholic 
Sun. at Syracuse, N. Y.. is to return 
to Chicago to resume his post pi 
editor-in-chief of the nVw World. It 
may be several weeks before Mr. 
O'Malley returns to the I.akesid'' 
City, but he will leave Syracuse with 
the good will of the Catholic clergy 
and laity of Syracuse. His return to 
Chicago Is not on account of an In- 
crease of salary, but because, like 
every true Catholic husband and 
father, he wants to be at home with 
his Wife and children. Mr. O'Malley 
apent the best years of his life in 
Kentucky, and every Irish-American 
In this city and State extends his 
best wishes to him and his. His loss 
to the Catholic Sun will be great, 
but his place will be filled In time. 
God helping. 



CON FIDBNTIAL LETT EC I is 



keen T,ord Tweedmouth and 
Emperor William a terrible row has 
been stirred up across the water. 
Men who write confidential letter! 
can always expect trouble. If you 
■kk have a secret to tell, don't mark 

your letters confidential, because 
your correspondent Is sure to have 
a friend, nnd that friend will have 
another friend. Hefore you know it 
an endless chain of people will know 
all about your confidential letter. 
Germany's Emperor, It seems, want- 
ed to make suggestions concerning 
fctbe English naval estimates, and tho 
"■English nation resents his alleged In- 
terference. Perhaps It was not such 
a bad letter after all. but It was the 
pledge to secrecy broken by Emporer 
William's correspondent that caused 
s the trouble. Englishmen are In the 
habit of breaking all sorts of 
V.'j pledges. Irishmen remember the 
broken treaty of Limerick' Cntl! 
the correspondence in full Is made 
public there will he Ill-feeling Ve- 
tween England nnd Cermany. 



JOl.T FOB SINN FEIN. 



The defeat of Charles J. Dolan by 
Fnincls M,. Meehan as a candidate 
for Parliament in North I.eitrlm Is 
..» terrible jolt for the Sinn Fein 
movement In Ireland. We shall heat- 
less and less of the defenders of that 
movement for some time to come. 
All of us want Ireland a free and 
Independent nation, and we want to 
see It brought about as«soon as pos- 
sible, and by as peaceable a means 
as possible, but the Sinn Felners 
have never accomplished anything. 
They have a right to hold their own 
opinions in the matter, but they 
ought now let Hon. John Redmond 
and his party pursue the plans they 
have outlined. It Is hard to ask 
Irishmen to wait! It has been wait, 
wait, wait, for years, but at each 
aucceeding session of Parliament the 
rish party has advanced a little 
This year the leaders have hope for 
more relief, but Just now tho Gov- 
ernment seems to have sidetracked 
Irish affairs and some of our friends, 
both In this and the old country, 
believe that Ireland, like man, never 
is, but always to be blessed. 

Once more we advise that Red- 
mond and his followers be given a 
cbance. Let the leaders In that 
party unite in the House of Com- 
mons and for awhile, at least, keep 
their quarrels locked In their family 
closets. Get home rule Prst. After 
that we can wait for Sinn Fein to , 
work out Us own cause. 



THE l>.\Y WE C'EI.EIIK.VI'K. 

Why do the Irish celebrate St. Pat- 
rick's day? Many non-Catholics aslt 
thlB question, not from levity, but 
because they really want to know. 
They say Kngla nd's sons do not cele- 
brate St. George'B day, neither do 
you see Frenchmen wearing the 
"Flour de lys" on any day devoted 
to a saint of France, nor do the peo- 
ple of any other nation honor their 
saints as St. Patrick is honored. 

The reason is that always, and 
often under very adverse circum- 
stances, the people of Ireland have 
kept alive the faith planted there by 
St. Patrick many centuries ago. 
Strongbow. Norman invaders, Crom- 
well, William Prince of Orange and 
other persecutors tried in vain to* 
uproot that faith. War, famine, 
pestilence, religious Intolerance' and 
persecution were all withstood. The 
faith planted by St. Patrick flour- 
ished under persecution and always 
shone brighter than before. Irish 
missionaries visited the continent of 
Europo and carried the faith to Ger- 
many and the Netherlands. Collegea 
and monasteries were established in 
Ireland nnd for centuries every man 
of letters went to that sainted land 
to complete his education. It wai 
there that the youth who afterward 
became Edward the Great was edu- 
cated. It was from the Irish schol- 
ars that King Alfred learned to keep 
track of his days. In those days 
there were neither watches nor 
docks, and the English method of 
reckonlug time was by looking at 
the sun. moon or stars. The Irish 
monks taught Alfred to divide his 
time by means of candles that would 
hum so many hours each. They also 
taught him to divide his day Into so 
many parts, eight hours for labor, 
eight for rest and recreation and 
eight for prayer. It was from the 
Irish monks also that King Alfred 
learned to care for the various 
artisans In his realm. Thero were 
stonemasons' guilds. shoemakers' 
guilds, tailors' guilds and guilds of 
all the trades. They were not only 
labor unions, but religious bodies, 
like the Catholic sodalities. It la 
to the followers of St. Patrick, then, 
that the present labor unions owe 
their origin, and to them can he 
traced the original udvocacy or the 
eight hour system. 

Exiles of Erin have carried the 
faith of St. Patrick to every quarter 
of the globe. The priests and nuns 
of Ireland have erected churches, 
colleges, convents, hospitals and 
asylums In every known land. There 
is hardly a town in the t'nlted 
States that has not least one St. 
Patrick's church, and St. Patrick's 
Cathedral In New York City is the 
largest and handsomest edifice de- 
voted to divine worship in America. 
All theae things have their effect on 
the minds and hearts of the Irish peo- 
ple. Warm hearted, impulsive, 
charitable, hospitable and kind, per- 
secution has only made the Trlsh 
stick closer to their religion. It la 
a part of their life. Without It they 
are nothing, but fortunately v«ry 
few Irish men or women lose Hit'lr 
faith. 8ome grow careless at times, 
but nearly all return to their old 
allegiance before death overtakes 
them. 

St. Patrick found Ireland a nation 
of sun worshipers. That great ball 
of fire that warmed them, that gave 
them light, that made trees lenv«> 
and flowers bloom and fruits to 
grow, was their God. Unlike other 
nations the nnclent Irish had no 
other Idol. The sun alone was their 
God until Patrick came to teach 
them of the Saviour of mankind and 
of the Blessed Trinity. Taking a 
shamrock from the soli he explained 
to the Arch-King and his people the 
mystery of the Triune God. Th<i 
King and hlg wise men listened to 
Patrick and were convinced of the 
truths that he taught. All over the 
Island went this apostle of the true 
faith and In a short time the entire 
nation had become Christianized a) d 
civilized. Not one drop of blood was 
shed while this remarkable work of 
conversion was going on. St. Pat- 
rick lived among his chosen people 
fifty-nine years and left Ireland h 
land full of churches and collegea 
and saints. 

No wonder it Is, then, that Irish- 
men everywhere honor St. Patrick 
by wearing the green shamrock of 
their native land on March 17; that 
they attend mass and listen to 
panegyrlos; that they gather to bear 
tales of love and glory from the old 
land; that sometimes thoy even havo 



dancing at their celebrations in 

honor of St. Pntrlck. 

TIME OF IM.VWCE. 

Services at the various Catholic 
churches In LodUvlle are being gen- 
erally well attended during this holy | 
senson of Lent. It Is a time for fast- 
lag, prayer and penance. For forty 
days devout Catholics prepare for 
tbfl glorious feast of the resurrec- 
tion. It Is the busiest season of the 
year, too, for pastors. Not only do 
tbev have their regular services, sick 
calls and other duties to attend, but 
two' or three evenings each week 
they have to give Instructions, recite 
the Stations of the Way of the 
Cross, celebrate benediction and hear 
many more confessions than ordl- 
nurily. 

Each day in Lent the church 
teaches us a new lesson in the life 
of our Divine Saviour. Beginning 
with the gospel of last Sunday, when 
we were told how Satan tempted 
Him. we are led gradually to that 
last great week In this holy season. 
Palm Sunday we will bp told of the 
hosannas sung before Him and of 
the palms strewn In his way as He 
entered Jerusalem. That is the be- 
ginning of Holy Week. A few days 
later we have tho Tenebrae. when the 
church shows us the darkness that 
had overspread the world prior to 
the coming of our Lord and Saviour. 
On Thursday of Holy Week we are 
reminded of the Institution of the 
divine sacrament of the Holy 
Euchnrlst on the eve of his passion 
and death. On Good Friday we re- 
call again that great tragedy of 
Calvary; the Insults offered the 
Divine Master by the Jews; his 
crucifixion and death. We are also 
taught that our misdeeds are added 
Insults and that we must curb our 
evil passions If we hope to be saved. 
Holy Saturday the church prepares 
us for Easter Sunday, the resurrect 
tlon of Jesus Christ, the crowning 
event In the redemption of mankind. 

As good Catholics let us attend 
as many of these solemn services ns 
possible. When it Is possible 
rnthers. mothers and their entire 
families should go together to mass, 
to the Instructions nnd other devo- 
tions practiced during this holy sea- 
son. For these forty days let us 
nvold Idle amusements, and if we 
are exempt from strict fasting we 
might practice some other act of 
abstinence. It Is a good Idea, also, 
for the whole family to Join In say- 
ing the rosary every night In the 
home when It is not convenient to 
attend services nt a church. Any 
little act of devotion done now will 
be rewarded by the Divine Redeemer. 



you Protestants, but Is it not a fact 

that the Catholic, church holds Its 
children I loser than any other?" 

Aye! There Is the rub! It is the 
Catholic schools in every city thi>t 
are civilizing, educating and teaching 
the children the difference between 
right and wrong. Take cities like 
New York. Chicago. Boston, St. 
Lotlla, Philadelphia and Baltimore. 
In those schools are to be found 
children who speak Polish. Bo- 
hemian, Lithuanian. Croatian. 
Slovak, Italian, German, French. | 
Spanish, Portuguese. Syrian, Belgian 
Ruthenlan. Greek. Norwegian and 
Danish. These children. If they at- 
tend Catholic schools, find tea(hcrs 
who can understand their language 
They not only learn to talk English, 
but they are taught to be good Cath 
ollcs and good American citizens. If 
they are Bent to the public schools 
they find teachers who do not under- 
stand them and they are lost to faith 
and country. 

CBthollcs have noted this assimila- 
tion that Bishop Walden spoke about 
for years past. Men like the grMi 
and lamented Archbishops Ftttgbes, 
of New York, and Martin John 
Spalding, of Louisville nnd lt:ilti 
more, saw this same problem mere 
than fifty years ago. Long even be- 
fore that the" Catholic church in 
other lands was fighting against a 
godless system of education. It is 
education without religious training 
for the children that makes free 
thinkers, that makes them believe I 
will reason for myself: that makes 
them defy authority; that Is respon- 
sible for waves of socialism and 
anarchy. It Is a gool sign to note 
thnt men like this Methodist Bishop 
of the West Is really studying the 
race nnd educational problems In- 
stead of spending his time finding 
fault with the Cnthollc church and 
berating its ministers. 

Our Catholic schools, colleges and 
universities nre not all the church 
hopes to make them, but they are 
Infinitely superior to any other edu- 
cational Institutions In the United 
States. Less than a generation henco 
the Catholic I'nlverslty at Washing- 
ton will be the most renowned, 
though it may be the youngest, of 
the world's great seats of learning 



OCR GREATEST PROBLEM 

As education becomes more gen- 
eral In the United States we find that 
our separated brethren are becoming 
more tolerant of Catholicity, more 
kindly disposed toward Catholics, 
and every day one finds new 
evidences that Pope Plus' desire to 
"unite all things in Christ" Is being 
steadily advanced. A few weeks ago 
an Interdenominational missionary 
conference was held by the vnrlous 
Protestant denominations in the 
States bordering on the Pacific coast 
The conference was held In the Cal 
vary Presbyterian church at Oak 
land, Cal. The ablest speaker that 
attended, and there were many 
students, scholars and orators pros 
ent, was Bishop John M. Walden. of 
the Methodist church. He told the 
assemblage In very plain lnnguage 
that the Catholic church was the 
greatest police power on earth. His 
language was startling to some, but 
he presented facts and figures In 
such an array that his address was 
neither censured nor criticised 

Bishop Walden has been assigned 
to discuss "The Problem of the City 
and from the start he made his fel- 
low-ministers sit up and take notice. 
Some of the things he told them 
were these: 

"One-third of the population of 
the United States live in cities", and 
they are the nation's best citizens, 
hut the modern cities with their con- 
flicting problems is the field in which 
the snlvatlon of the race will have 
to be worked out. The people of the 
cities are better fitted to guide the 
destinies of the nation than any 
others. and I would feel safe with its 
fate In their hands alone. Theirs 
Is the opportunity and they make 
good use of It. In the larger cities 
the population Is in a process of as- 
similation. The chief problem thnt 
confronts us Is immigration. And 
here I would say a word for the 
Catholic church. The great body of 
Immigrants are Catholics. They are 
scattered, liable at all times to 
temptation, but they are held by the 
ties that bind them strongly. They 
are Catholics and are csred for as 
Catholics. What could we of other 
denominations do with this great im- 
migrant horde if it were not for the 
Catholic church? It is the greatest 
police powei that could be exerted 
over these new millions, and It holds 
them securely in .Its conservative 
grasp. How could we take care of 
our foreign born population, how 
could our police forces handle and 
control them If It were not for the 
conservative influence of the Catholic 
church? I don't want to challenge 



BELIEF FOB IDLE MEN, 



The dull times that followed the 
panic of last October have not 
passed away, although signs of busi- 
ness activity are apparent in sovie 
quarters. Those who can afford It 
should do what they can to help the 
Idle nnd unemployed, and there are 
lots of Idle men nnd women in all 
of our large cltleB. Wage workers 
have created the preperty and the 
wealth of the United States, and 
they should have a right to enjoy a 
great part of Its benefits. Men and 
their fnmllles should not he allowed 
to starve In any community, and 
wherever possible some work should 
be found for them at good wages 
Idleness begets mischief. It Is the 
Idle men who hatch anarchist plots 
and who seek to destroy all forms 
of government nnd to defy all forms 
of authority. 

Some people suggest that the over- 
plus of Idle workers be transferred 
to the country. Men used to work 
Ing In railroad shops and factories 
do not often prosper In the rural 
districts. They have no desire to 
farm and they know absolutely noth- 
ing of raising crops, nnd there ar» 
millions of men who could not tell 
a field of potatoes from a field of 
wheat. For such men life In a farm- 
house Is nothing but punishment. It 
might be profitable for our National 
or State Governments to try a 
scheme of colonization — to establish 
little towns where the working man 
could have his ljttle plot of ground, 
and that while he worked in the fac- 
tory his children could learn farm- 
ing. This would bring about a race 
of thrifty mil' and fnrm workers; 
It would lessen the evils to bo feared 
from Idleness. Austria has tried 
this scheme with marked success. 



Former Mayor Dunne, of Chicago, 
advises his fellow-Cathollca In the 
Lakeside City: "If you must vote for 
either of two rogues, vote for the 
non-Catholic. In that case the Cath- 
olic will not get a chance to bring 
disgrace upon yourselves and your 
religion." This same advice seems 
sound for Louisville and every other 
city in the country. We have had 
bad Catholics in office In Louisville, 
but their number has been exceed- 
ingly small. 



That story in the Cincinnati En- 
quirer to the effect that. former Gov. 
Beckham would like to get control 
of the Democratic organization in 
this State, so he would be second 
man on the national ticket, sounds 
like a Joke. Gov. Beckham had 
control of the 8tate machine once 
and he might have retained that con- 
trol had he not undertaken to Inter- 
fere with Louisville unnecessarily. 



STEWART DRY GOODS CO. 

(RusinrM Betahliahed Sixty Years.) 

JteW)*>RKS To R* 




The New Furniture Department. 

Inspection is invited to the new Furniture Department, occupying the^en- 
tire fifth floor, and containing handsome specimens of skilled workman- 
ship in the most varied assortment of sets for the parlor, library, 
dining-room, bedroom, den and summer home; representative of all 
periods, woods, finishings, etc., and economically priced. 

The New Household Club Plan 

In conjunction with the Furniture Department is the new feature in 
modern retailing and the most convenient for buying 

Furniture, Carpets and Upholstery. 

A small payment at the regular low prices entitles members of the House- 
hold Club to buy everything that goes to furnish tho home, and on 
terms so easy to arrange that the payment is a continuous pleasure, 
appealing particularly to those who are on a weekly allowance 

Inquire of the salesmen in the Furniture, Carpet or Upholslery Depart 
ments, or at the credit office, where full particulars will be given. 



The New flode!s for Spring In 
Women's Tailored Suits 
Included In 
This List of Specially Low Prices f 

Spring's most attractive styles in Tailored garments, exclusively designed 
by the best Parisian and American modistes, and made of the season's 
most fashionable materials, will be offered for this week's selling at 
remarkably low prices. 

Women's Tailored Suits, made of striped suiting material; extra good 
quality; 34-inch coat styles; taffeta lined; plaited skirt, with fold trim- 
ming—Special for this week at $25.00 

Women's Plain Tailored Suits, made of English serge; Prince Chap cutaway 
coat, taffeta lined; plaited skirt, fold trimmed; colors navy, Copenhagen, 
blondine, brown and black — Special for this week $20.00 

Women's Tailored Suits, in shadow stripe worsted; all colors; newest c«at 
model; satin trimmed striped taffeta lining; skirt trimmed; exceptionally 
good $30.00 value Special this week $27.50 

Women's Tailored Suits, in shadow stripe worsted materials; Prince Chap 
coat style; taffeta lined; plaited skirt, fold trimmed; colors black and 
blue — Specially priced at $15.00 

Women's White Serge Suits, strictly tailored; made of extra quality 
Engiish serge; 34-inch coat style; taffeta lined; plaited skirt; fold 
trimmed Specially priced at $32.50 



STEVWiJ DRY GOODS CO. 

tlaaafaaraaaf) 

IN CONNLCTIUM WITH lAMU MuCntUY 4 VaV. HEW ViXUL 




PIANOS 



New Uprights; celebrated make; 
fully warranted; equal to the 
best $250 pianos now being of- 
fered. For a few days only, price 



$150 



F. M. TILLER, 

NEW LOCATION. 

Cor. 5th and Walnut Sts 



A Beautiful White Loaf of Bread, 



RESULT OF BAKING. 




WATCH TOK THE l'KEMIUM TICKETS, 

EDINGER & CO., im«-«ui«i«- 



FLOWERS 



FOR 



Unless signs fall the spring will 
he early this year. As early as last 
week the graBS took on an emerald 
hue and many trees put forth their 
buds. It makes everybody feel re- 
juvenated to notloe Nature's new 
mantle of green. 



Easter and Confirmation 




Should be ordered early; Let 
me fill your wants from my 

COMPLETE STOCK 

Aug. R. Baumer, 

j» FLORIST J* 

MASONIC TEMPLE, 4tb and Chestnut 

BOTH PHONES 

Special attention to out of town orders. 




fox Ridge 
(sal 





$16 Per 100 Bushels. 

We have the most centrally located yards in the city, the best coal, the best 
teams, the best drivers and can guarantee the most satisfaciory deliveries - 
what more could you ask? 



SCANLON COAL CO., 



I ncorpom ted . 



SECOND 
SECTION 



Kentucky Irish American. 



SBCOND| 
SECTION 



VOLUME XX.-NO 11. 




LE, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 



MAGNIFICENT 



Are to Bo the S06AM During 
\«'\v York's Solemn 

Centeiuurjr. 



St. Patrick's tiitliodrnl Will Ki- 

Ttaronired with Church 

Dignitaries. 



Grand Structure la Monument 

U) So 1 1 - 1 >o 1 1 in I ot Working 

People. 



CARDINAL LOGUE TO PRESIDE 



6t. Patrick's Cathedral, New York 
City, is the largest and roost mag- 
nificent house of worship in the. 
I nitod Slates. In this edifice the 
solemn celebration of the TPiMttlHiry 
of New York as u diocese oil) be ob- 
served during the week beginning 
A pr i 1 24, and the entire Catholic 
world is interested in the approach- 
ing event. The Catholic church wi'.l 
lend her Princes and dignitaries to 
odd .-.oleum splendor to the event, 
and each special service will be at- 
tended by a gorgeous pageant. Each 
function will have some symbolical 
meaning. Kvery Catholic in the 
United States will join with those 
in Now York in a prayer that the 
centenary celebration will not only 
bring additional blessings to the 
great archdiocese, hut that it will 
lend toward extending Catholicity 
in the United States. 

St. Patrick's Cathedral is an im- 
mense structure, but it will not be 
art, all adequate to admit the vast 
throng that will seek to enter and 
witness the ceremonies. The clergy 
alone would make a large sized con- 
gregation, and thro will scarcely be 
room for all the Bishops and Arch- 
bishops in the sanctuary. In the 
first place three Princes of the 
church will be present — our own 
Cardinal (iibl>ons, of ltaltiiuore; Car- 
dinal Logue, of Ireland, and Car- 
dinal Mom ti. <'f Australia. Archbishop 
Parley, head of ihe New York arch- 
diocese, expects all of the fourteen 
Archbishojxs in the United State! t 
be present and a majority of the 
ninety Hi-shops scattered throughout 
the country. Add to ihese the 
mitred abbots, the heads of various 
Catholic orders, the l'apal Delegate, 
Monsignor Paloonio, and his train, 
the attendants mi the various pre- 
lates und more than 1,900 visiting 
priests, and you will find quite an 
aggregation of clergymen. 

Not only will the centenary have 
its religious meaning, but it will give 
to the world an ocular demonstra- 
tion of the enormous growth of the 
Catholic efauufa not only in New York 
but in the whole United States. In 
1808 the United States had one 
Archbishop, now it lias fourteen. 
Then there were only four dioceses-- 
I.ouisville. Boston. New York and 
Philadelphia. The number of 
churches has grown from seventy to 
12,513, and the number of priests 
from sixty to l.",C.">r>. 

The first Bishop of New York was 
the Wight Itev. Luke Concannen, an 
. Irish Dominican who had been for 
several years previous to his conse- 
cration • resident of Kome. Many 
years before the Irish Dominicans 
hod been missionaries to the new 
world nnd had previously established 
a station in Kentucky. It -was on 
the idea that they "were so we'l 
fitted for missionary work in a new 
and growing country that a Domini- 
can was made first Bishop of New 
York. Ho 'was consecrated in Home 
on April 24, 1808. At that time Eng- 
land and France were at war, and 
the new IHshop was um.ble oft-r 
repeated trials to reach his diocese. 
He died at Naples on June 10, 1810, 
without ever having seen the diocese 
over which he was to preside. It 
was not. until November 6, 1814. that 
a second Bishop was consecrated. He 
was the Kight Rev. .lohn Connelly, 
another IrlHh Dominican, who died 
in 1825. 

Only a few years before the Declar- 
ation of Independence Catholics were 
barred from entering or teslding in 
New York. The War of the Revolu- 
tion served to sweep away many 
barriers and at the opening of the 
nineteenth century there were sev- 
eral thousand Catholics on the IslunJ 
of Manhattan. These, were of the 
Irish, English, French, Scottish nnd 
Mexican races. The Irish were I ho 
most active in church work. The 
troubles of '98 in Ireland helped to 
swell the number of immigrants, so 
that there were no less than 15,000 
CoJthoHcs in New York diocese when 
it was erected in 1808. Even before 
a Bishop arrived they had projected 
a Cathedral on Mott street. The Irish 
predominated then as now and St. 
Patrick was the putron of the new 
edifice. The corner stone was laid 
in 1809, nnd the structure was com- 
pleted in 1815. It was to this edifice 
tfliat Bishorp Connelly come and there 
he and his six eessors reigned until 
the present Cathedral was completed 
in 1870. 

It was Archbishop John Hughes, of 
illustrious memory, who projected 
the new and present St. Patrick's 
Cathedral. He began without a cent 
but trusted to Ood to provide, in 
1858 he sent letters to many of the 
members of his flock whom he knew 
were wealthy, asking for contrlbu 
tk>ns of (1,000 each. In res|>onse he 
received contributions of $1,000 each 
from 103 persons, including several 
Protestants. With $103,000 as a 
nucleus he laid the cornerstone 
the new Cathedral in 1859. He was 
created first Archbishop of New York 
in 1850, and died January 3, 1864. Tho 
Cathedral was not completed for 
fifteen years after his death, at 
which Cardinal MeCloskey was Arch- 
bishop of New Ytirk. 

The edifice it a fine example of the 
ithirtecnruh century Gothic, and under 
the direction of the architect, James 



Renwick, an Irishmnn, its building 
was carried on with the greatest 
care. The contract price of the 
structure was $870,000, but the total 
amount expended on it was more 
like $3,000,000. If the plat, on which 
the Cathedral now stands, which ex- 
tends from Fifth to Madison avenue, 
and from Fiftieth to Fifty-first 
street, were acquired nt present real 
estate values and the Cathedral had 
to be built now It is believed that 
the total value of the property would 
not be less than $20,000,000. While 
many wealthy men contributed tc 
the ' building of tibia magnificent 
structure, the greater part of the 
money was furnished by Irish serv- 
ant girls and Irish laborers. 

It is particularly appropriate that 
Cardinal Michael Logue, Primate of 
Ireland and Arehbialrop of Armagh, 
the See over which St. Patrick him- 
self presided, should preside at the 
grand Pontifical mass of thanksgiv- 
ing which will open the celebration. 
Armagh is also the native diocese of 
Archbishop Farley. A few dayH be- 
fore the centenary a meeting of all 
the Archbishops nnd Bishops in the 
United States is to be held nt Wash- 
ington, and these noted dignitaries 
are expected to go to New York in 
a body. 

uitowiNu SOME. 



New York Publicist Si 
People Seek Subur- 
ban Homes. 



John D. Crimmins. of New York, 
eminent n.s an Irish-American, a 
Oatholic, a publicist, and as an ob- 
server, said recently: "New York'j 
tunnels ami bridges will make it i>os- 
iiblc for every family to live in their 
own castle; the castle may contain 
only three rooms, but it will be a 
Imiiie, and there is suoredness at- 
tached to that. Old New York Is 
being depopulated as a residential 
center, but. the great city grows with 
the country's growth, and will al- 
ways maintain its supremacy." 

Mr, Criminins adds: "The old city 
of New York comprised within its 
limits and waters that surround 
Manhattan Island approximately 
14,000 acres, not as large as 
Home farm areas. The harbor of 
New York affords unmsuol facilities 
for commerce, for communication 
not alone with every part of this 
country, but with ev, ry part of the 
world outside that may be reached 
by the ocean ways. 

"The suburbs are making steady 
growth, fully equal to the destruc- 
tion of the genteel tenements and 
homes in S'vtions where they have 
Imm-ii removed. This movement will 
increase on the completion of the 
various tunnels, some completed and 
otlu-rs projected." 

<j KHALI) <;im FIN. 



Brief Sketch of Brilliant 
Young Irlsb Writer 
Tor Press. 



SIGNERS 



Of the Declaration of Independence 
Who Were Horn in 



At Least Four Were Natives of 
the Old Sod Says 
History. 



Son . thing About The Dorry Man 
Who Was Prominent in 



WAS A FRIEND OF BEN FRANKLIN 



Ciernld (iriffin, the author of many 
poems, sketches, arm I at least one 
novel that has been dramatized, was 
born in the County Limerick, Irelanl, 
in 1803, and died in the City of Cork 
in 1840. His poem, "The Sister of 
Charity," is not only an English 
lassie, but has been used in many 
atholic school readers in Ireland, 
England and the I'niled States. 

At the age of twenty he left Irc- 
and for. England and obtained em- 
loyni' nt on the daily papers in hon- 
on, where his sketches and Irish 
folk-lore tales soon won him steady 
and lucrative employment. After his 
return to Ireland he wrote "The Col- 
eginns," his moat pretentious work, 
which was later dramatized, and still 
lolds the boards under the name of 
'The ("olleen Dawn." 

Herald Q fiffin was always of a re 
Itgious turn of mind, and in 183S he 
joined the order of Christian llrot It- 
ers in the City of Cork. While teach- 
ing at tiheir college there in 1840 he 
ontruotcd a fever and died within 
a few days. 

Di ll PITll.lC DDI IT. 

The pubflc debt of the United 
States In 1792 was $77,217,924.66, 
but by the year 1835 it had been re- 
duced to $37,513.05. an Inconsid- 
erable sum. In 1863, the war was 
on, and the debt had grown to more 
than one billion of dollars. By De- 
cember 1, 1906, when the last statis- 
tics were given out. It had 
grown to the enormous proportion of 
$2,429,370,043.54. 



WHKRE IRMH WIN. 

Many Irish students have been suc- 
chHful in the recent examination 
held under the auspices of the Royal 
College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. In 
the examinations held in Glasgow 
by the faculty of physicians several 
Catholics June achieved successes. Ah 
an indication of the irtterest Catholics 
are taking 1n professional life it i« 
interesting to note that there are 
now close on 150 students — male and 
female — at Glasgow University. Ten 
years ago Oatlholic students were for 
from numerous at (iilmorebill, and 
twenty years ago there were scarcely 
a dozen. 



A Boston exchange says it lg a 

fact worth remembering tltat of the 
fifty-six signers to the Declaration of 
Independents four were born in lre- 
lond, aid of these four three are 
accredited to Pennsylvania. Charles 
Thomson ut the age of eleven years 
was en rout* to 'this country with 
his father and three brothers. His 
father died after they were in sight 
of 'and, und thus the boy wus thrown 
ii|M>n his own resources immediately 
ujMin landing at .New Castle, Del. 

An older brother hail preceded hint 
to America and was enabled to give 
the young immigrant the benefit Of 
watchful care, but its was necessary 
for him to assume grave, resixmaiMU* 
ties at a very early age. The older 
brother prevailed upon n fellow 
countryman. Dr. Francis Allison, to 
admit Charles to his seminary in New 
I.ondon, Point. 

The little immigrant boy was pre- 
cocious und proved to be a very ap: 
scholar. Such was his advancement in 
studies that while ye* a boy he was 
chosen to conduct a Friends' acad- 
emy at New Castle, Del. He formed 
the acquaintance and won the friend- 
ship of Franklin through articles 
ootitr Pinned to Franklin's paper. 
These artieUs were mostly on the 
subject of the Indians. The interest 
he took in their welfare and the fa.r- 
ness with which he dealt with the.n 
led the Dclawares to adopt him in 
17'iti. His intimate acquaintance with 
them and their very high esteem ftr 
him brought nbout his appointment 
as commissioner among them. 

The Dclawares named bint "Man of 
Truth" and .lohn Adams referred to 
him as "the Sam Adams of Philadel- 
phia; the life of the cause of lib- 
erty," for he was among the first to 
take his stand with the colonists, 
exercising am immense influence 
owing to his reputation for ability 
ami integrity. 

In September, 1774, he arrived at 
Philadelphia with his bride, a daugh- 
ter of Richard Harrison, of Pennsyl- 
vania, when lie was informed thut Ah 
had been chosen Secretary of the 
first Continental Congress. "He was 
the soul of that political body," 
wrote Abbe Robin, the chaplain of 
Kochiimbcnu. 

He declined pay for his first year's 
services, but held to his duties 
through each succeeding Congress 
unrtil 17S9, when he returned to 
private life. The careful notes !•» 
had taken as Secretary of Congress 
formed the groundwork of his his- 
tory of the Revolution, but so consid- 
erate was he of other's feelings that 
he destroyed his manuscript notes 
lest his record of the unpatriotic 
course of sour of the colonists might 
work injury and embarrassment to 
their descendants. 

After his retirement from public 
ltfe he wrote and published several 
works of merit which won approval 
at home and abroad. For the most 
|Mirt his writings were confined to 
Scripture subjects. His translation 
of the New Testament from the 
(ircek cost him much time nnd labor 
and his translation of the Old Testa- 
ment from the Senile rogint was the 
first English version of that early 
translation. 

Charles Thomson was ltorn in May- 
hern, CouiVty Perry, Ireland, Novem- 
ber 29, 1729. He died in Lower 
Morion. Penn., August 10, 1H24. 



FLAG OF IRELAND. 



Green is universally regarded a* 
the Irish color, but antiquarians say- 
green as the notional flag of Ireland 
is of comparative modern date. Tin- 
latest authority to ♦•pepress an opin- 
ion on the subject is Canon 
French, a learned member of the 
Royal Irish Academy. He does not 
accept the explanation that the green 
fktg was adopted by the i'nitcd Irish- 
men at the close of the eighteenth 
century by blending the orange and 
the blue, the latter being then re- 
garded by some as the Irish flag. He 
asserts the. emerald green standard 
was used in Ireland in the sixteenth 
century, but it was not till the eigh- 
teenth' century that it became the 
national color. 



who carried specimens of these 
flowers from Ja|Htn to France. 

The magnolia was named in honir 
of Magnoi de Montpelier. Other flow- 
ers' names are descriptive. Lady*>: 
sli|»per resembles a tiny slipper. Tic 
blossoms of lady's "tresses are twisted 
like a braid of hair. The flowers of 
the foxglove arc like the fingers of 
a glove. 

The name foxglove is said to he i 
corruption of folks' glove or fairly 's 

frlove. Aster means star nnd received 
ts name from the starlike ravs of 
this flower. Daisy is really day's 
eye. Dandelion means lion's tooth. 
Do you think the name is appropriate 
for this notched, rather jogged 
f lower? ' 

Anemone means wind flower. The 
anemone is so delicately poised that 
it tro-nnMes in the slightest breeze. 
Dutchman's breeches resembles nolli- 
.ng so much as a baggy- pair of trous- 
ers. Morning glories, bloom only In 
the morning and four oVIocks'not 
until that hour in the afternoon. 

NNERTY 



PALACE 



To lie Raised in the Center 
Boroughs of Manhattan ami 
Bronx. 



Tak.H Stand For tlio Irish Who 

Came Here Mans Warn 
A go. 



Little Attention Paid to Brln'a 

Sons of Pre-ICrv oliilion- 
ary Times. 



Thousands ot the Irish Sought 

lionics in America in 
nt4«.». 



Present Value of Property Is In 
Excess of llundnd Thou- 
Dollars. 



in 



Kerry Peopta Come to Front 
Largo Numbers For 
Fair. 



PROMINENT MEN INTERESTED 



LOVED BOTH GOD AND LIBERTY 



1KRM UTS ECONOMIC STRENGTH 

Baron Speck von Stembung, the 
Oerman Ambassador to Washingto/i. 
and who married a niece of Arthur 
I-unghaan, of Louisville, r<rently de- 
livered an address before the Cham- 
ber of Commerce at Tamps. Fla. He 
spoke <on "Germany** EcoihmiiIc 
Strength." Avoiding to the Boron, 
until tlho sixtijes of the nineteenth 
century, and it some instances even 
later, Germany's economic strength 
was regarded as poor. Today the 
same territory supporta 62,000,000 
people, or more than an increase of 
30 per cent, '/he Ambassador also 
mode a detailed statement of Ger- 
many's .financial strength, taxation 
and insurancr ' statistics. 



ADVICF. ON HF.A1MNO. 



The great Roi?or Bacon, known to 
the world as "The Admirable Doc- 
tor," and who flourished in England 
In the thirteenth century, wrote: 
"Read not to contradict nor to be- 
lieve, but to weigh and consider. 
Some books are to be tasted, others 
to be swallowed, and some few to be 
chewed and digested: that is. some 
are to be read only In parts, others to 
be read but curiously, and some few 
to be read wholly with diligence and 
attention." 



FLOWF.P. NAMES. 



It is interesting 'to know how cer- 
tain flowers received their names. 
Many were named after people. F:>r 
instance, the fuchais were so called 
because they were discovered by 
Leonard Fiichs. 

Dahlias were n-vm.-d for Andre 
Dahl, who first brought them from 
Peru. The camellia received Its name 
from a missionary named Kamel, 



Don. John Finorty, of Chicago, 
soldier, politician, statesman an J 
journalist, is himself again after u 
long illness. In one of his latest 
articles he Kays: 

American iiiiniJgraition in large 
numbers is of a more recent date, 
an outgrowth of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. In earlier periods immigrants 
found their way to other European 

possessions in the New World. Im' 
their number wias comparatively 
small. Ccrtnini A nlOM "histor- 
ians'' have paid little attention to the 
Iri^h clement of pro-Revolutionan 
times. This is mainly due to the 
anti-Irish and anti-Catholic prejudice 
Of New Kngland "historians." Yet the 
Irish element has l>cen here from 
(tie begimuiig and has been among 
the most, important in establishing, 
defending and perpetual itur the re- 
public. "There were Irish at Ply- 
mouth with the Pilgrims," says John 
I). Crimmins in his Irish-Amcrifm 
M isce41atiy, "at Salem and Post m 
with the Puritans, nt New York with 
the Dutch colonists, and so on down 
into Pennsylvania, Maryland, Yir- 
ginia, the Carol inas nnd other parts." 
Yet owing to the prejudices above 
moretioimd is due the obscurity thnt 
now envelopes the history of the 
Irish settlers here in cui'-lv times. 
Many of these Irish had in their 
veins some of the best and most 
ancient blood of Ireland. But better 
still, istrly Irish coiners wore strong 
of lintb, stout of heart and cheerf.il 
in spirit. They loved Cod and liltertv, 
loved virtue and freedom. Since 
their day millions of their race, pos- 
sessing tlie same admirable traits, 
have come to the 1'nit-d States and 
contributed to it* upbuilding. 

In 1049 some 4.'i.0U0 Irisb came to 
the colonies, driven out of Ireland 
by the Cromwellian persecutors. In 
His'J an Irish colony came to Mary- 
land, and during the. same \ear they 
colonized North Carolina. In ltiU9 a 
large Irish emigration came to Pon.i- 
syS.inia, which gave to America 
many of the leaders in the movement 
of independence. In 1710 witnessed 
the beginning of a Large Irish immi- 
gration in Virginia. The new comers 
tulttlcd princ.i|*illy along the Blue 
Itidge, where are now the counties of 
Itockbridigo and Patrick. In 1729 the 
records e4hi»\\' that ."i.tiuo Iri.-h arrived 
at the port of Philadelphia, as 
agaSnst 2H7 F.nglish and forty-three 
Scotch. In 1787 the Irish colonized 
South Carolina. One of the histor- 
ians of Sooth Carolina *nkl: "Of all 
other countries none has furnish' d 
the province with so many inhaV 
itiants as Ireland." In 1 745 the Iri !i 
went in great, numbers to Kentucky. 

From the earliest days the Dish 
liud been settling in nil the other 
SUirtes. Victims of English injustice 
they were foremost and loudest in 
the' call for American independene". 
It is admitted that John Rut ledge 
"was the first man whose eloquence 
roused South Carolina to the level 
of resistance." When the stamp net 
was |>assisl Heiijamin Franklin, writ- 
ing from I^tndion to Charles Thomp- 
son, one of the Irish settlers of Penn- 
sylvania, afterward Secretary of the 
Continental Congress, said: "The sun 
of liberty is se*t. The Americans 
must light ww the lamps of industry 
and economy." Rut Thompson, like 
a genuine Celt, sent back t he ringing 
answer: "Be assured we shall light 
tbrdhes of quite a different sort." 

AN AGED CLASS. 

Ke"<k>m If ever has Cardinal Gib 
bins been called upon to confirm 
such an aged class as confronted him 
In Washington, D. C„ a short time 
ago. Twenty-four adults were 
brought before him at the buikling of 
the I.itSle Sisters of the Poor in 
Washingtdh and many tottered from 
the burdens of life that had piled 
upon their shoulders for fourscore 
years and more. In the class there 
were men and women whose ages 
were right on the border of the oen 
tury mark. Others were somewhat 
younger, but, taken as a whole, It 
was an exceedingly old class. The 
average age was reckoned at seventv- 
five years. Although advancing In 
year* himself, the Cardinal found 
none so active as himself. 



The Irish Palaeo Building Associa- 
tion of New York has sent out its 
report, which contains all its receipts 
and expenditures from May 8, 1897, 
to June 30, 1907. From this report one 
learns that preparations for the erec- 
tion of a building that will be a home 
and a headquarters for the Irish 
societies of New York and a credit to 
the Irish people, are now in a fan- 
way of completion, and a fino sit : 
has been secured at the southwest 
corner of Lexington avenue and One 
Hundred ami Fifteenth street. This 
is the chief feature of a voluminous 
report issued to the Irish people in 
pumphlet form by the Irish Palace 
Ituilding Association, giving tho re- 
sult of ten years of work. 

The location is practically in the 
center of the Boroughs of Manhattan 
uid the Bronx and easily reached 
b\- all the chief transit routes. It i« 
it prttient occupied by eleven rent 
bearing houses, nine fronting oa On* 
Hundred ami Fifteenth street and 
two on Lexington avenue. The prop- 
rty was purchased on June 1, 19(10, 
for $05,000, of which $2">,000 has been 
paid, and there is a mortgage for 
the remaining $10,000. It has a front- 
e of 12,'» foot on the .south side of 
One Hundred und Fifteenth street 
and of Sj feet 11 inches on the west 
ido of Lexington avenue, but 7."i feet 
west of the avenue the lot widens 
to loo foot ami continues at tint 
width for the remaining 50 feet. The 
present, valun of the property is 
$110,000. The rental derived from' the 
leven houses pays the interest on 
the mortgage, the city taxes, the run- 
ning exjx'iis>is of Mia property and 
adds something every year to tho 
principal. 

The funds with which this property 
was bought were realized by a fair 
bald at the Grand Central Palace lit 
1.SU7 under Um auapiccu of an Incen- 
tive Committee appointed by the 
First Kogiment. Irish Volunteers, the 
booths being managed by committees 
from twenty-nine Irish county organ- 
izations conij>oscd mainly of ladies, 
whose devotod work wus the chief 
factor in the. success of the enter- 
prise. The not proceeds of the fair 
amounted to ttttWMSi but tho prop- 
erty ami funds now oonitrolhd by the 
Irish Palace Building Association 
make a total of $l.'l3.:t:i».59. Deducting 
th« mortgage of $40,000 •from this 
leaves $'.»:(, :t.t!». 59 as the amount real- 
ized from the original investment. Of 
this sum $2:i,:;:i9..V.i is a cash balance 
to the credit of the association and 
$09,600.41 its equity in the. property- 
after deducting the mortgage. This 
shows a remarkably profitable lnvost- 
ment. 

The accounts of the association 
have been audited at various times 
by a certified public accountant, Mr. 
Bdward Owen, formerly one of the 
city's Commissioners of Account s, 
and the report gives n detail «1 and 
itemized statement of receipts and 
expenditures from the foumikitioii of 
the enterprise. May s, is;i7, to June 
30, 1907. With the' historical and fi- 
nancial report is given a supplement 
containing fac-slmiles of all the !m- 
itortant, documents connected With it. 
These are the original charter of the 
association, the certificates of incor- 
poration, the deed of conveyance of 
the property, the policy of title in- 
irunce issued by the Title Guaran- 
tee and Trust Company, anil the cer- 
tificates of the public accountant. It 
is a coincidence that the Secretary 
of Saute who signed the certificate of 
incorporation was John T. Mclton- 
ough, an Irish-Am* irkran. 

Ih ing incorporated under tho laws 
of New York, the financial reports 
are filed with the County Clerk and 
the association is under tho jurisdic- 
tion of the Supreme Court, so that 
It enn not be diverted from the 
original object of Us charter, and its 
accounts are open to the inspection 
of all citizens having an interest 
therein. This object, as stated in the 
charter, is "the construction of a 
building in Ihe City of New York f Ji- 
nn armory for the Irish Volunteers" 
and "for meetings and as»'imbkiges 
of the Irish race in this city." 

The proposed building is to be Irish 
in every particular, ot She best style 
of architecture and with, an imposing 
round tower ait its northeast comer- 
Besides having all the features of 
an urmory. it will hove a library weil 
stocked with the best Irish Itooks 
and meeting rooms for the accommo- 
dation of the societies. The report 
concludes as .follows: 

"The members of thei association 
have endeavored to give a complete 
exhaustive and authentic report of 
tlneir administration of its affairs, to 
the end that all who have an Interest 
in the subject may become thor-, 
oughly Informed of the exact condi 
tion of the asoooiation and may see 
their way to aid in raising the neces, 
narv fund." to complete ithe good 
work by the construction of a build 
ing upon, the land owned by the asso 
elation, which will be a lasting monn 
ment to the glory of 'the Irish race." 

The re<port is signed by the follow- 
ing memibers of the association: 
James R. O'Beirne. Roderick J. Ken 
nedy, John B. Kelly. Edward C 
Sheehy, Edward Browne. Stephen 
MicFarhtml. William II. Walker. Ed- 
ward Cossln, John J. Joyce, Charles 



Many Americans sympathize with 
the people of Ireland because tsey 
have heard thnt they were oppressed 
and downtrodden. Others scorn Ire- 
land nnd everything Irish. Not ono 
out of every 1,000 Anvericans knows 
anything of the way the people of 
Ireland are overtaxed. 
The population of Ireland is about 
,500,000. For the year 1908 Great 
Britain has taxed the Irish people 
$47.4.'i0,000, or $21!"»,000 more than 
last year. The tax on tea will he 
$2,700,000, tobacco $0,455,000. wine 
$460,000, foreign spirits $l,740,ono. 
whisky, beer, etc.. Including licenses, 

$17,240,000. In nil nearly *:in,nno, 

Every time an Irish woman buys n 
pound of ten she pays the Fnglis.i 
Government a tribute of five peiUM', 
Tho actual profit, made out of Ireland 
last year by the Knjrlish Government 
was $9,055,000. If the people would 
diminish the purchase of excisable 
articles by one-half l-'ngland woulo 
lose from' $2,000,000 to $2,500,000 a 
year on the government of Ireland. 

KM II AIM) L. SIIIKL. 



J. Crowley, John Devoy, Daniel F 
Cohalnn. 

The late Col. William L. Brown was 
Treasurer of the association, and 
Mr. Fdward S. Sheehy, former Com- 
missioner of Taxes, has been admin- 
istering the funds since his death. 

Th«i report also shows that of the 
thirty-two counties in Ireland the 
Kerry men nre $000 ahead of any 
other county. Kerry stands at the 
head of the list with $2,000, while 
the next in line, is Clare with $1,400. 
Tyrone is third with $1,300, and so 
on down until Wioklow comes in with 
$124.82. 



LOVE Of GOD 



TAXATION. 



Ireland Impoverished That 
England May Grow 
Rich. 



Native of Ireland Who Rose 
to Eminence as Eng- 
lish Statesman. 



l!i<1inrd Lalor Rheil, one of the 
world's most, famous orators, was 
ltorn near the City of Dublin in 1791. 
His parents were wealthy and he 
received many educational advan- 
tages. After receiving his primaiy 
oours.i at Trinity College, Dublin, he 
went to the. famous Jesuit College 
it. st on_\ hurst, Kngland. At the age 
>f twenty he was called to the ba-. 
Not, long after he was elected to the 
British Parliament, from Milhourne 
Port) and at once command' <l the 
respect, of his fellows by the vigor, 
earnestness anil cloipicnoe of his 
speech. lie was ever in the fore- 
front of battle for Ireland and the 
Irish. Tie was a friend to liberty an 1 
a foe to tyranny. 

I hiring his i-areer in Parliament 
Mr. Shlel attached himself to the 
Whigs. and successively l>ecaiiie 
Queen's Conned, Privy council lo-. 

Commissioner of Greenwich Hospital, 
Vice President of the London Board 
of Trade. Judge Advocate. General, 
Master of the Mint, and died nt 
Florence in 1881, while serving as 

Knifland's Minist<*r Plenipotentiary 
to Italy. His orations in Parliament 
are regnnded as Knglish cla.ssics. 



RASTER FM>\VKHS. 

Louisville florists are now busy 
furnishing bulbs to girls and matrons 
who like to milk'.-, presents of flow- 
ers at Faster. Hyacinths, tuli.ts and 
jonrpi'ils are the mos-t popul-.r bulbs 
nt this season of the year, '."hey are 
the easiest to raise and are mint 
emblematic of spring. These bulbs 
an be plnntnl in this climate two 
weeks from the present, and will 
bloom in Knster. 



MRS. PHARAOH'S (,KMS. 



The Jewels of the wife of Setl II., 
ono of the Pharaohs, have been found 
in Thebes and have bpen sent to the 
British Museum In London. Setl II. 
Is believed to have been the Pharaoh 
the Book of Exodus. Little Is 
known about Mrs. Setl, or whether 
she had any rivals in hor royal hus- 
band's affection. These Jewels were 
probably gazed upon by Joseph or 
Moses. 



HtlSH CASTLES. 



An exchange says: Athlone is one 
f the few places in Ireland where 
we am told a castle (eoislen or cais- 
tel) yvas erected in pre-Norman times. 
The Four Masters. In the year 1120. 
say: "Tho Castle of Athlone and the 
bridge were erected by Turlougli 
O'Conor In the summer of this ypar, 
I. e„ the summer of tho drought." 
The other pre-N r orman rnstles, so far 
as known, were nt Ballinasloe, Gal- 
way and Colktoney, all erected ii 
1124: Cuileanntrnch (unidentif led I, 
demolished in 1155; Tuam. envied in 
1104; and Ferns demolished in 1100 
What sort of structures these pre- 
Noronnn castles were we are nowhere 
directly told, but we may. perhaps 
Infer that tho one at Athlone. nt anv 
rate, was of wxxxl. as it was "burned 
by a thunderbolt" two years later. 

ARISTOCRACY. 



While Americans deny that there 
are any aristocrats in the country, 
and decry aristocracy generally, there 
Is nevertheless the aristocracy of the 
rich and of the trust magnates in 
America. Edward Everett, one of 
America's earliest philosophers and 
writers, said concerning aristocracy: 
What subsists today by violence, con- 
tinues tomorrow by acqulesence and 
Is perpetuated by tradition till at 
last the hoary abuse shakes the gray 
hairs of antiquity at us and gives It- 
self out as the wisdom of the ages. 
Thus the clearest dictates of reason 
are made to yield to a long succession 
of follies. And this Is the founda- 
tion of the present day aristocratic 
system. Its stronghold, with all 
those not Immediately interested In 
it, la the reverenceWttf antiquity 



Is the Only Motive That Actuate* 
Little Sisters of tho 
Poor. 



Home in Louisville Is One of 
Many Scattered Over 
World. 



Care For Aged and Inllrni and 
Reap No Reward on 

Earth. 



WHAT ONE MAY SEE THERE 



Of the 2r»0,000 people thnt live iu 
Louisville how few there arc who 
know the cares, anxieties, industries 
and good accomplished by that order 
known as tho Iyittle Sisters of tho 
Poor. The sist, rhood was founded in 
Prance nearly a century ago. One 
of its first branches in the United 
States was that established in Louis- 
ville something more than thirty-fivo 
years ago. One of the first citizens 
of lyouisville to no ot the original 
Little Sist.-rs. to aid ami advise them, 
was Col. Mike Muhloon. Now, a* 
thirty-five years ago. he is their 
friend. He is a daily observer of tno 
good they accomplish. 

The Little Sisters of the Toor is 
a r-ligious organization founded in 
Prance. In lyouisville nearly all its 
members are French, though there 
have been Irish women among them 
here, notably Sister Laurentine, of 
blessed m- inorv. whose nnma in tha 
world was Miss Mary Mi-Connack. 
these o-.xsl women care for the aged 
und infirm of all races and creeds. 
Negroes are admitted as freely as 
whites if there is room for them, 
but whites and blacks, men nn 1 
women, have separate quarters. 
There is no greater charity In tho 
world than that performed by the 
Little Sisters of the Poor. Slate!* of 
Charity, Mercy, Loretto, St. Dominic, 
care for the orphans, educate the 
children, look after the si,-k. It Is 
not hard for the human heart to 
go out. in love and sympathy to 
babies ami children. When it comes 
to i-a ring for old people it is alto- 
gether different. It is the most 
thankless task on earth, and those 
who undertake it will receive their 
reward* only in the next, world. 

The cluster of buildings at Tenth 
nnd Magazine streets represent the 
work of years of toll for the Llttl 
Sisters of Louisville. There botWj 
400 and .'>oo aged and infirm people 
are oared for. They have no homes. 
Many of them have seen hotter days, 
but now nre dependent upon the 
bounty of the Little Sisters. 

Those Sisters are gentle of voice 
and of modest mien. They l>eg con- 
tinuously from store to store, from 
door to >]'»eX Often they get alms; 
occasionally they nre. insulted. They 
give thanks for the alms; they bear 
the insults meekly. From restaurants 
they get bread and other food for 
their poor. In other places they 
receive clothes, scraps of cloth, 
yarn, tobacco, old newspapers and 
other odds and ends of refflse stuff 
The Sisters are utilitarians; they 
make use of everything. Nothing is 
thrown away. The work they have 
lone in ibis city has been appre- 
lated many residents of Ixtulsvllle, 
but they are unknown t« a great 
many residents of the city. 

It is rare that a person under the 
ago of sixty is admitted to th"ir 
home. Often they are seventy, eighty 
and ninety years old. At present 
there nre some inmates of the home 
that have pass.nl the century mark. 
They have their dining rooms, re- 
fectories, dormitories, lounging 
rooms, work rooms and chapel. 

The chapel is so arrnnged that the 
very old and Infirm can hear mass 
r assist at any other religious serv- 
ice without having to ascend or de- 
scend a flight of stairs. The devotion 
f old people at these services is 
angelic. All have become little chi'- 
dren nnd assist n't. the various sol- 
emnities with childlike devotion. 

When one enters the hall or recep- 
tion room ho mav be. greeted by an 
aged woman with a dozen or more 
lolls. She is polite; she will call 
'Mother," but hor mind is gone back 
to her childhood days when she 
played with dolls, or mayhap to her 
young wifehood when she was sur- 
rounded by happy children. Yon 
smile with her. but not at her, and 
accompany the Mother Superior to 
other quarters. Perhaps you will he 
taken into the men's quarters first. 
Some in arm chairs, others walking 
up and down, many smoking rttubby 
pipes, Others are reading newspapers 
and magazines: still others are te'l- 
irUT their Iteads. 

In another room you may encoun- 
ter a denth-b<d *c"ne. It may be thnt 
the dying ono is a>..'ored person. At 
tihe bedkdde is a nun. (Tiyuped around 
the room are nged men N »iid women 
reciting prayers for the dyn\- 

When the weatheir permits t*», nj 1 
men engage in ganlening nnd trim*"* - 
mlng the vines in the grape arbor, 
while (those of the old women who 
are able to vcork take their knitting 
or sewing and sit in the sun, or If 
the day is too warm seek shelter in 
the shade. None will regret a visit 
to the Little Sisters of the Poor. 



COSTLY CHALICE STOLEN. 




ately In 

I 



■Anofther theft of nn historic church 
treasure is reported from Oenzano, 
where a splendid chalice, valued at 
$40,000, has been stolen from the 
parish church. The chalice was one 
presented bv the King of France to 
Cardinal Ocllngcnza, afterward Pone 
L,-o XIII It was superbly desigmd 
and inevnsted with dJnmonds. rubies 
nnd topnzos. Along with the e.hall- 
aererol other precious articles, he 
looms of Cardinal Dellagenzs, ha 
disappeared.